How to Keep the Stakes High in Your Script

The Tools to Keeping An Executive and Audience Engaged
Taught by Nate Matteson

$249

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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This Next Level Education class has a 93% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Nate Matteson

Producer/Manager at Gotham Group

About Your Instructor, Nate Matteson: In his seventh year working in representation, Nate Matteson manages the careers of some of the most exciting emerging filmmakers and television creators at The Gotham Group, one of the top management and production firms in Los Angeles. Named by Variety Magazine as a “New Leaders of Hollywood” in 2011, Nate found his calling discovering and cultivating talent. Most recently, Nate will be overseeing production on the feature film, Stephanie, with Academy Award winner Akiva Goldsman attached to direct and Bryan Bertino (The Strangers) and Jason Blum (Paranormal Activity, Insidious) attached to co-produce. Nate's clients have won Academy Awards, written for directors both home and abroad (Stoker) and are creators of TV series such as Sleepy Hollow. Last year alone Matteson has sold projects to Paramount, Lionsgate, Disney, Netflix, Sony TV, Europacorp, FOX TV Studios, ABC Family, Relativity, CW, and Cartoon Network. After getting his professional start working for renowned television director David Nutter and creator Josh Friedman, Matteson cut his teeth in representation as an agent-trainee at Paradigm. He is a graduate of the University Of Wisconsin. Full Bio »

Summary

To see a video sample of the class, see below!

4 part class taught by Nate Matteson, literary manager named one of “Hollywood's New Leaders” by Variety Magazine. No matter if you write comedy, drama, horror or sci fi, every page has to count. It's easy for an executive to get distracted or lose focus if a script doesn't have high enough stakes for the protagonist, and/or the antagonist and secondary characters. One of the biggest reasons for passing we hear from executives are lack of clear or tangible stakes. Learn what it takes to keep the stakes high and keep the executive reading!

Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 4 part class:How to Keep the Stakes High in Your Script - Keeping An Executive and Audience Engaged taught by Nate Matteson, literary manager at Gotham Group. Learn straight from the source on what he teaches his clients to keep them working!

Here's a sample of what to expect in this exciting Next Level Class: 

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Nate is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate!

What You'll Learn

Part 1 - Introduction: Macro vs Micro-view Stakes

Nate discusses what defines "stakes" and why they are important. He follows with a thurough examination of macro-view stakes versus micro-view. Nate also delves into common traps writers fall into and how to avoid them.

Part 2 - Finding the Balance: Internal vs External Stakes

Nate explores script structure and where the stakes should start and end. He continues with a discussion about how antagonists should create stakes, and how to find the balance between internal and external stakes. He also explains stakes on an episode vs. season vs. overall series level, using Breaking Bad as an example.

Part 3 - Stakes and a Character's Arc

Nate goes over a "hypothetical sequel" scenario with the previously-recorded live class. He further explains the importance of stakes and how they should directly affect a character's arc. He answers the question, "can you ever have too many stakes?" He also gives pitching advice on how to properly present the stakes in a writer's story.

Part 4 - How to Add Stakes Without a Rewrite

Nate gives advice on how a writer could check their work to make sure the stakes are escalating the story. If a script is done and the writer has to incorporate more stakes, how can they do so and avoid having to rewrite their entire script? Nate goes over a series of scripts he has come across in his own career that he has altered to inject more stakes. Lastly, he will also discuss what supporting characters could be used to raise the stakes.

About Your Instructor

About Your Instructor, Nate Matteson:

In his seventh year working in representation, Nate Matteson manages the careers of some of the most exciting emerging filmmakers and television creators at The Gotham Group, one of the top management and production firms in Los Angeles.

Named by Variety Magazine as a “New Leaders of Hollywood” in 2011, Nate found his calling discovering and cultivating talent. Most recently, Nate will be overseeing production on the feature film, Stephanie, with Academy Award winner Akiva Goldsman attached to direct and Bryan Bertino (The Strangers) and Jason Blum (Paranormal Activity, Insidious) attached to co-produce. Nate's clients have won Academy Awards, written for directors both home and abroad (Stoker) and are creators of TV series such as Sleepy Hollow.

Last year alone Matteson has sold projects to Paramount, Lionsgate, Disney, Netflix, Sony TV, Europacorp, FOX TV Studios, ABC Family, Relativity, CW, and Cartoon Network. After getting his professional start working for renowned television director David Nutter and creator Josh Friedman, Matteson cut his teeth in representation as an agent-trainee at Paradigm. He is a graduate of the University Of Wisconsin.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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