How to Set Up Production for Your Film or Series

Taught by Carol Kravetz

$199

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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Class hosted by: Carol Kravetz

Production Coordinator for shows such as Breaking Bad and It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia as well as various features for MGM, Warner Brothers, HBO and USA Network!

Carol has been a Production Coordinator in Film & Television for over 30 years, in entertainment for over 60. Some of her film and television credits include features for MGM, Embassy, AIP, Filmways & TNT, two mini-series for Warner Brothers, Queen; Roots III and Heaven & Hell; North & South III, and movies of the week for HBO & USA Network. Her series television credits include Showtime Red Shoes Diaries, Nickelodeon Brothers Garcia, 20th/Sony Party Of Five, FX’s It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia, Showtime/Sony Huff and her last show that she retired on was AMC/Sony Breaking Bad. Carol is now involved in a current collaboration with Kenny Chaplin and Film Industry Training Seminars, LLC, in which she is excited to give back to the film & entertainment community that gave her so much over the years. She has written a manual this year as well as created and launched a 2-day LIVE workshop on being an experienced veteran Production Coordinator. She hopes to give students, career transitioning adults and Veterans of the Armed Forces a good sense of the business end of making movies. You can read more about Carol on her IMDb page as well as her Stage 32 Profile. Full Bio »

Summary

It’s hard to fully appreciate just how much work goes into getting a film or TV production going. The volume of moving parts and number of i’s to dot and t’s to cross can feel staggering. It takes someone with wicked organizational skills, resourcefulness and the ability to work long hours and handle a multitude of tasks simultaneously under high-pressure situations. Whether you are a director, producer, production assistant or production coordinator, knowing how to discover your crew members’ skill sets, delegate effectively and execute tasks with extreme precision is a must for cultivating a successful career.

While organizational skills and drive are certainly important in coordinating a production, it takes more than this to be a successful production coordinator or producer; it also takes a good amount of knowledge and wherewithal that doesn’t simply come naturally. Navigating union rules, building time sheets, filling out permits, working with stunt performers, building your electrical and grip departments, the list goes on. These aspects are all crucial, but if you’ve never carried out these tasks before, you’ll need guidance and education to make sure you’re doing it right and not missing any important steps.

Well we have you covered!

Carol Kravetz is a veteran and highly sought-after production coordinator who has worked on projects for over 30 years and set up productions for notable series like BREAKING BAD and IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA, as well as various features for MGM, Warner Brothers, HBO and USA Network. Very few people know more about production coordination that Carol, and she has built a passion of giving back by teaching others her trade and giving students, career-transitioning adults and veterans of the Armed Forces a good sense of the business end of making movies.

In this 4-part previously recorded class, Carol provides a fully comprehensive guide on how to be prepared to prepare, prepared to shoot and prepared to wrap. You will learn Carol’s personal list of Production Coordinator best practices, from the various tasks you will be expected to perform and how to execute them with precision, to how to recognize each document you will need in a mound of paperwork, to how to transition the office from pre-production to shoot to wrap. You’ll learn how everything is paid for, how to facilitate rentals and purchases for on-set departments, and the common pitfalls and traps that happen during production so you can avoid them. Carol then teaches you her networking, resume and follow up tips to help you find work and keep working past the wrap party.

With interactive lectures and homework assignments directly geared toward making you a stronger and more competent Production Coordinator, you will leave this class with a comprehensive understanding of how to be an effective Production Coordinator and be a valuable asset to any set you work on!

 

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class. Although Carol is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate.

 

 

Praise for Carol’s Stage 32 Class

 

"Taking Carol's Production Coordinator Class was full of detailed information to get someone up and running in the position of Production Coordinator. Carol also has some great tales from the entertainment industry to make it entertaining along the way. If you want to know the ins and outs of the production office and how it relates to the production overall, this is a great class to take."

- Laura D.

 

"Carol is a wonderful source of information. Perhaps best at her department. I'd like to thank Carol for her fantastic contribution to my professional career and private learning. You have been unique and very resourceful!"

- Willem V.

What You'll Learn

Part 1: Who’s Who, Who Does What And Where Do We Start?

  • Who Are You?
    • The Production Office personnel.
      • Production Assistant role (PA).
      • Production Coordinator role (POC).
      • Assistant Production Coordinator role (APOC).
      • Travel Coordinator.
    • Time Delineations.
      • Prep, Shoot, Wrap.
  • Attitudes, priorities, and promptness.
    • Share constructive criticism with POC.
    • Gossip on set is toxic.
    • How to not let anything fall through the cracks.
    • Why early means on time.
  • Are You Ready To Be A POC?
    • How to find work.
    • The resume.
    • Your elevator speech.
    • The interview.
  • You Got Hired!
    • Get the details.
      • How many prep, shoot, wrap days?
      • How many people can POC hire?
      • Salaries, box rental, mileage.
    • How many offices are required?
    • Finding an office.
      • Where to start, how to weed out choices.
      • Get contract to legal.
      • Approvals and move in.
    • Furniture and phones.
      • How many phone lines, how many phones?
      • Telephone Company and phone vendor.
      • Furniture vendor.
        • Furniture list.
      • Get quotes – telephone, furniture, equipment.
      • What to do if the project is a studio show.
    • Be A Good Example.
      • Do your start paperwork.
      • Order petty cash.
      • Use military time with film minutes.
    • Why Accounting Is So Important!
      • Procedures to pay.
        • 3 ways to pay.
      • Policies and procedures – forms, forms, forms!

Part 2: How To Get Set Up And Ready To Run:

  • Production Office Set Up.
    • What to do while you wait for the Production Office Contract from Legal.
      • Read Production Manuals (including Producer, Accounting, and Insurance.
      • Interview crew.
      • Green light to move in/ order furniture and phones.
    • Physical set-up of the production office.
    • Office supplies/order the basics.
    • Get approvals and distribution.
      • Purchase orders, Check requests, Petty cash.
      • How to get approvals from UPM.
      • Copying and filing.
    • Equipment and Technology Needs.
    • Bulletin boards and office identification documents.
    • The kitchen.
    • Additional maintenance.
    • Production files.
    • Travel Coordinator duties.
      • Travel Memo/Movement List.
      • Per Diem.
      • Ground transportation.
      • Upon arrival.
    • Office parking.
  • The Clock Is Ticking.
    • Pre-Production Markers.
      • Who starts work when?
      • Department heads and crew starts.
      • Becoming Signatory.
    • Union Rules.
      • DGA data report.
      • SAG contract reporting.
      • IATSE members in good standing.
    • Answering The Phone.
      • Take concise messages: date, time, who, what, where, priority.
    • Lists and Forms.
      • Crew List.
        • Alphabetical or Hierarchical.
      • Office Extension List.
      • Vendor Contact List.
      • Paperwork and Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.
      • Look ahead – availability lists to hire personnel.
      • Cast and Crew Packets.
        • Additional documents for certain packets.
        • Making the employment packets.
      • Daily Time Sheets.
      • Distribution Lists.
        • The HEART of production.
        • Accumulated forms and information.
        • Match people with documents.
      • Prep Schedule.
      • Insurance certificates.
      • Accident reports.
      • Independent production insurance.
  • Casting – Part 1.
    • Do they need an Office?
    • Get quotes, make a budget and get approvals.
      • Send contract to legal.
      • Write purchase orders.
      • Check requests.
    • Communication with Production Office.
    • Casting sessions.
    • Cast deal memo.
    • Station 12 – SAG clearance.

Part 3: Pre-Production Continues – Key Events:

  • Casting Part 2 – Back at the Production Office.
    • Cast physicals.
    • Cast headshots.
    • Travel preferences.
    • Cast fittings.
    • Cast list.
    • Days out of Days.
    • SAG Contracts.
    • Exhibit Gs.
    • Stunt players.
    • Taft Hartleys.
    • Minor permits/rules.
  • Day-to-Day Activities.
    • Facilitate rentals and purchases.
    • Camera Department.
      • Camera crew and equipment.
      • Digital or film.
      • Expendables and specialties.
      • Video village.
    • Electric and Grip departments.
      • Electrical crew.
      • Grip department.
      • Lighting and grip equipment.
    • Sound department.
    • Get approvals before Equipment is ordered and delivered!
  • Office Prep For Shoot.
    • Set box.
    • Daily action board.
    • Sides.
  • Schedule of Pertinent Pre-Production Events.
    • Meetings, scouts.
    • Office Personnel.
      • APOC assignments.
      • PA assignments.

Part 4: Looking Ahead To The Finish Line:

  • The Set Is A Big Black Hole.
    • All other departments.
      • Script Supervisor.
  • Paperwork the POC needs close and handy.
    • Call sheets.
    • Production reports.
      • Cast, Crew & Vendor lists.
      • Cast deal memos.
      • Schedules.
      • Day-out-of-Days (DOOD).
  • The Office Settles Into Shoot Mode.
    • Daily progress report.
    • Maps and call sheets.
    • Runs – to set and other places.
    • The football – morning paperwork.
    • Daily prep schedule.
    • Dailies; film to the lab and returned to view a days work.
  • Wrap party/Wrap gifts - Be Prepared!
    • Wrap supplies.
    • Create the wrap book.
      • Assets memo and form.
      • Storage and/or ship.
    • It’s a wrap! The end of principal photography.
      • Department wrap reports.
      • Loss and damage (L&D) reports.
      • Last days.
        • Confirm plans.
        • Additional help.
        • Pack.
        • Ship or storage.
      • Office OUT.

About Your Instructor

Carol has been a Production Coordinator in Film & Television for over 30 years, in entertainment for over 60. Some of her film and television credits include features for MGM, Embassy, AIP, Filmways & TNT, two mini-series for Warner Brothers, Queen; Roots III and Heaven & Hell; North & South III, and movies of the week for HBO & USA Network.

Her series television credits include Showtime Red Shoes Diaries, Nickelodeon Brothers Garcia, 20th/Sony Party Of Five, FX’s It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia, Showtime/Sony Huff and her last show that she retired on was AMC/Sony Breaking Bad.

Carol is now involved in a current collaboration with Kenny Chaplin and Film Industry Training Seminars, LLC, in which she is excited to give back to the film & entertainment community that gave her so much over the years. She has written a manual this year as well as created and launched a 2-day LIVE workshop on being an experienced veteran Production Coordinator. She hopes to give students, career transitioning adults and Veterans of the Armed Forces a good sense of the business end of making movies.

You can read more about Carol on her IMDb page as well as her Stage 32 Profile.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

  • This course was a terrific opportunity to learn about the Production Office from a knowledgeable and experienced professional. It was an enjoyable and worthwhile experience.
  • The class was fine - just a lot of money for what it was though.
  • This was an excellent refresher course for me. Carol covered so many important details that go into coordinating a film and television production and the material was very well organized. I loved Carol's enthusiasm and sense of humor and feel her presentation was as entertaining as it was informative.

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