Master Screenwriting Basics Certification

16 Total Weeks + Payment plans available - contact edu@stage32.com for details
Taught by AZ Yeamen

$1,599

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

Sorry. This lab is fully sold out.

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Projects:

Class hosted by: AZ Yeamen

Story Editor, Covenant on AMC's ALLBLK, Executive Director & Founder Bridge 17

AZ Yeaman has sold nearly every script she's ever written. She has become the go-to for revisions, doctoring, whipping stories into shape, and pitch packages for Netflix, TVOne, Aspire TV, UMC Streaming, Bounce TV, and independent production companies. Most recently, she served as a Story Editor on Covenant on AMC's ALLBLK. AZ is passionate and focused, with a granite-hard work ethic. She focuses not only on pursuing and developing her career in script/story development but also on fostering exciting, new talent. Every day is an opportunity to do more, learn more. She's an admitted lifelong student, an absorber of sights, sounds, and sensations that make her a natural-born writer. AZ brings heart, energy, and clarity of vision to story development and screenwriting projects. Her students have created concepts in class, outlined, drafted, written, rewritten, and sold projects to networks. Full Bio »

Summary

"Great screenwriting is never heard, never read, it's felt."

- AZ Yeamen

 

Get Your Master Screenwriting Basics Certification Exclusively Through Stage 32

Keeping you on the cutting-edge of the entertainment industry, because we are the global online resource for creative professionals.

Spots Filled, if you would like to join in 2022 please contact edu@stage32.com!

 

Ready to master your craft?

Learn elite screenwriting fundamentals, in-depth story analysis strategies, writing techniques and more.

Stage 32’s online Master Screenwriting Basics Certification was designed for creative professionals looking to expand their knowledge to expert level by studying screenwriting course materials and taking our certification online. When earning a Master Screenwriting Basics Certification and becoming a certified screenwriter, choosing the right training is essential.

You've found the right place.

 

A Master Screenwriting Basics Certification from Stage 32 can help you expand your screenwriting career.

In 16 weeks over this 14-session course with 2 creative weeks for your own writing, you will be using a proven technique designed for emerging writers to rise above the pack. This certification contains functional skills to develop your craft with pacing, authentic storytelling, building your writing muscle, and basics of screenwriting. You will learn not only the techniques to step ahead of the pack with your writing, but you will also be working on perfecting your own writing technique.

Stage 32 is the worldwide leader in entertainment industry education and is a marketplace that connects creators with content producers. After you finish your certification you will earn an exclusive Stage 32 Certificate and Stage 32 will provide you resources to help take your new skills into the professional marketplace, including a career development meeting with an industry professional.

 

Get certified from a leading industry expert.

AZ Yeaman has sold nearly every script she's ever written. She has become the go-to for revisions, doctoring, whipping stories into shape, and pitch packages for Netflix, TVOne, Aspire TV, UMC Streaming, Bounce TV, and independent production companies. Most recently, she served as a Story Editor on Covenant on AMC's ALLBLK.

AZ is passionate and focused, with a granite-hard work ethic. She focuses not only on pursuing and developing her career in script/story development but also on fostering exciting, new talent. Every day is an opportunity to do more, learn more. She's an admitted lifelong student, an absorber of sights, sounds, and sensations that make her a natural-born writer. AZ brings heart, energy, and clarity of vision to story development and screenwriting projects. Her students have created concepts in class, outlined, drafted, written, rewritten, and sold projects to networks.

 

Ready to take the next step?

Our master screenwriting certification was designed by entertainment industry professionals for entertainment industry professionals to help you succeed. For less than $100 a week you will become a certified screenwriter and be given the tools you need to enter the professional market exlusively through Stage 32. 

 

PLEASE NOTE: This exclusive Stage 32 certification course is limited to 10 people and will be booked on a first come, first served basis. The opportunity to work this closely and for this long with an expert in the field is an incredibly unique and valuable opportunity. If you are interested, please book quickly. Once the spots are gone, they’re gone for good.

What You'll Learn

PART ONE: THE FUNDAMENTALS OF SCREENWRITING (8 Sessions)

 

Week 1 – Introduction, Method, and Screenwriting Basics

The best way to start scriptwriting is to know which format - TV or Film meets a writer's strengths by understanding the history. Knowing the history of a craft grounds the craftsperson in its true intention. We will discuss the differences when writing intense visuals versus dialogue-heavy mediums, character's journey versus development, and finding the path using a unique method I call - "The Spectrum."

  • Brief history of film and TV writing
  • Script Formatting
  • The base elements of a script
  • How to plot your character's emotional arch
  • Find your Character's journey (using spectrum).
  • Q&A

Handouts: How to make your words sing. Learn how and when to use scriptwriting emphasis in dialogue. It's not what you say, and it's how the emphasis is written.

Assignments:

  • Setting the world with an Emotional Mapping guide.
  • Identify emphasis with page reads from Whiplash and Spotlight

 

Week 2 – Approaching Story

The adage in storytelling goes, there are two types of story entrances – someone leaving town or someone new to town. This week's class will review the definition of story, choosing the proper arc type to best convey your story, obligatory scenes that are must-haves within specific genres, formats, and styles. As well as tone setting to help guide the story with proper pacing.

  • Breaking down Story “STORY = CHARACTER + DESIRE + OBSTACLE”
  • Story Arc Types
  • Obligatory Arc Beats
  • Shaping story based on genre – Obligatory scenes
  • Rinse & Repeat: opening image tone setting• Q&A

Handouts: Story Arc Types

Assignments:

  • One-page script story starting with the phrase: "If not now, when?"
  • We are rewriting your one-page script based on the assigned genre.

 

Week 3 – Scene Structure

Start early, leave late. Show don't tell. You've heard these, all before but how do you do this, exactly? This week we'll discuss a method I teach on character intentionality. Setting your character's motivation from their action, to dialogue, to what they're not saying. Techniques learned this week will show you how to write characters with meaning – no fluff – no fat.

  • Defining character motivation in each Scene.
  • Defining setting context to support scenes.
  • Handout: Scene Construction
  • Exercise: Read, Watch, Identify scene elements.
  • PCR method: Scene's Problem, Complication, and Resolution
  • Action Lines
  • Q&A

Handouts: Scene structure definitions

Assignments:

  • Read assigned pages from Gone Girl
  • Subtext introduction worksheet.

 

Week 4 – On The Page: Story Pacing, Dialogue, Your Authentic Voice

Write with style. Remember, this course is about finding your "authentic voice" to best market your script. Good writing is good writing, but sometimes, bad writing gets sold because the writer was authentic to their style of storytelling. We still need properly formatted scripts, but how do you have the reader emoting with your characters? This week we're going to dig into the writer's objectives and character's intentions.

  • Dialogue: TV vs. Film, two different histories, two different styles.
  • What the heck is story pacing, and how to use it?
  • Psychology of Character dialogue.
  • Writing succinct action lines.
  • Writing tone and style-specific character descriptions.
  • Dialogue: Character power shifting.
  • Internal vs. External conflict
  • Character vs. Scene Emotional intent.
  • Q&A

Handouts: How do you lie? - Selecting character traits.

Assignments:

  • Subtext Assignments 2, 3.

 

Week 5 – On The Page: Story Pacing, Dialogue Part 2

Subtext in scriptwriting is defined as a deeper meaning of text – what we see on screen. The visuals, actions, dialogue of a character. The build-up of enigma, obnoxiousness, and intrigue. This week, we'll use the tools we learned from previous weeks PLUS some new techniques to understand how to build a three-dimensional character and the world that supports, denies, and confirms them.

  • Subtext methods
  • Subtext: Traits of building a human.
  • Assignment Due: Opening 5
  • In-Class Assignments: Subtext Identification
  • 6-steps to Scene Structure.

Assignments:

  • Subtext Assignments 4, 5.
  • Opening 5 pages.

 

Week 6 – Let's talk it through…

  • One-on-One Consultations.
  • Q&A

Assignments:

  • Opening ten pages.

 

Week 7 – On The Page: Subtext Part 2

Have you ever watched a film or television that you didn't like just because you wanted to figure that one clue or red herring? Sure, you have. The writer gives meaning to symbols to create suspense, which suspends the audience into watching more. This week, we'll discuss how to write a carefully crafted scene that holds the audience's attention.

  • Subtext: Irony, Suspense, and Symbols
  • Assignment Due: Opening 10
  • Writing Internal vs. External Conflict.
  • Q&A

Assignments:

  • Opening ten pages – The rewrite.

 

Week 8 – Effects of Storytelling

The audience continues to read or watch your story because they are engaged. Tension-driven scenes create tension-driven character emotions that do tense acts that create a tense movie with payoff. The payoff comes mainly from the author; "what do you want to say in this film?" Your tools are character, connection, and emotion to communicate your thoughts on any given matter as a screenwriter. Your job is to share the problem that needs to be solved and the character that needs to change to resolve it. How?

  • Audience Psychology; when to make them feel what.
  • Connect the audience to the character:
  • Pity/Feeling Sorry
  • Undeserved Misfortune
  • Evoke Hope
  • Hope Creates Worry
  • Create Jeopardy (For Constant Engagement)
  • Q&A

Assignment Due:

  • Opening 10 pages

 

PART TWO: 4-WEEK SCRIPT ANALYSIS (4 Sessions)

This section will analyze screenwriting methods used in iconic series and landmark films and explore narrative approaches that support character, series engines, and film construction, with a thorough understanding of the three-act structure.

Week 1 and 2 will concentrate on two pilot episodes, one comedy, one drama. Week 3 and 4 will focus on two iconic films.

 

Week 1 – Introduction, Narrative Approach, Screenwriting Methods, and Techniques.

Know what you're going to do, say what going to do, do it, then do it differently.

  • Writer's perspective in viewing the narrative story.
  • Screenwriting Methods and Techniques
  • Character identity formation and reformation
  • Social Perspective
  • Dramaturgy
  • Character development, themes, and connection to the audience.
  • Q&A

Assignments:

  • Series Pilot watch and read.

 

Week 2 – Screenwriting Methods and Techniques when Developing Character

  • Analyzing openings that create empathy and connection with the character.
  • Analyzing planting and payoff techniques.
  • Examine character arc in iconic series.
  • Examine the writer's point of view.
  • Technique section one: setting breadcrumbs/planting, payoff, and twist.
  • Q&A

Assignments:

  • Technique mapping exercise.
  • Film, watch and read.
  • First Test.

 

Week 3 – Acts, Sequence, and Scenes

  • Analyzing scene setups.
  • Examining themes.
  • Exercise: Scene study – exposition and reveal.
  • Technique section two: character arc consistency and public persona reveal.
  • Q&A

Week 3 Handout: Scene Construction

Assignments:

  • Technique building worksheet
  • Film, watch and read.

 

Week 4 – Character Arc development in Acts, Sequence, and Scenes

  • Analyzing assigned film three-act structure.
  • Examining audience connection.
  • Studying plants and payoff in film (understanding callbacks).
  • Course Review.
  • Q&A

Second Test.

 

2-WEEK ASSESSMENT

Over the final two weeks of this course, we will test writers on the basics of act, act breaks, sequence, scenes, and classic teleplay writing techniques.

 

PART THREE: ASSESSMENT AND CERTIFICATION (2 Sessions)

Over the final two weeks of this course, we will test writers on the basics of act, act breaks, sequence, scenes, and classic teleplay writing techniques.

Week 1: Preparing for Certification

Screenplay basics certification is next week, so let’s sort through any information you may be unclear about - script, character development, story structure… let's work through it all.

Caveat -- we’ll be working on your scripts. We’ll split into two groups; Group A Film focused writers/Group B TV focused writers. As a group, using the script review handouts, each group will assess their individual script (first 10 pages) and work together to address the fixes based on the lessons learned through the course week.

Handout: Practice Assessment

Assignments:

  • Complete practice assessment.
  • Polish your script.

 

Week 2: Screenplay Assessment & Certification Test

FILM TRACK (Group A) Week 2 – Screenplay Assessment review.

  • Q&A session to review all materials covered over the course.

 

TV TRACK (Group B) Week 2 – Teleplay Assessment review.

  • Q&A session to review all materials covered over the course.

 

CONCLUSION: MASTER SCREENWRITING CERTIFICATION TEST 

Over the course of 14 sessions you will be tested on what you've learned -- After you finish your certification you will earn an exclusive Stage 32 Certificate and Stage 32 will provide you resources to help take your new skills into the professional marketplace, including a career development meeting with an industry professional.

 

 


 

About Your Instructor

AZ Yeaman has sold nearly every script she's ever written. She has become the go-to for revisions, doctoring, whipping stories into shape, and pitch packages for Netflix, TVOne, Aspire TV, UMC Streaming, Bounce TV, and independent production companies. Most recently, she served as a Story Editor on Covenant on AMC's ALLBLK.

AZ is passionate and focused, with a granite-hard work ethic. She focuses not only on pursuing and developing her career in script/story development but also on fostering exciting, new talent. Every day is an opportunity to do more, learn more. She's an admitted lifelong student, an absorber of sights, sounds, and sensations that make her a natural-born writer. AZ brings heart, energy, and clarity of vision to story development and screenwriting projects. Her students have created concepts in class, outlined, drafted, written, rewritten, and sold projects to networks.

Schedule

PART ONE

Sunday January 2 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday January 9 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday January 16 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday January 23 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday January 30 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday February 6 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday February 13 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday February 20 – 10am-12pm PST

 

PART TWO

Sunday March 6 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday March 13 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday March 20 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday March 27 – 10am-12pm PST

 

PART THREE

Sunday April 10 – 10am-12pm PST

Sunday April 17 – 10am-12pm PST

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class. If you cannot attend a live class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. Plus, your instructor will be available via email throughout the lab.

Q: Will I have access to the lab afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of the lab, you will have on-demand access to the video recording, which you can view for one month after the class is complete.

Testimonials

~Chris Strickland

First and foremost, AZ is AMAZING! The information provided, the examples, the illustrations, the assignments were all geared towards equipping us to become great script writers. I MUST take the course again. Nothing but applause for AZ and her style of teaching.

 

~Rachel Cuyler

If you’re someone like me who keeps saying they want to be a writer, this is the place to start taking that seriously. AZ is informative and fast-paced, encouraging you to rise to the occasion with every assignment.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

Other education that may be of interest to you:

4 Steps to Writing Your Feature Film First Draft

  Interactive class with the Top Story Editor of Covenant on AMC's ALLBLK Payment plans available - contact edu@stage32.com for details   In this interactive, four-part class exclusively through Stage 32, you’ll learn proven techniques designed for emerging writers to write your first draft with help from a professional screenwriter, teacher, and script consultant. You’ll learn how to create your logline to test the strength of your idea while brainstorming, conduct character analysis to form the emotional journey at the core of your story, break your story into sequences, run crucial reports to analyze your script’s strengths, and more. You’ll also receive weekly assignments to ensure that you understand the lessons covered. With a small number of spots available, you’ll be able to develop real connections with other passionate writers. Your expert instructor, AZ Yeaman, has sold nearly every script she’s ever written. She uses the techniques in this course for her own stories and teaching emerging writers, helping them rise above the pack, selling projects to networks, and placing in many screenwriting competitions. AZ continues to hone her own skills as a writer, consultant, and founder of Bridge 17 Scriptwriters’ Studio. She has become the go-to for revisions, doctoring, whipping stories into shape, and pitch packages for Netflix, TVOne, Aspire TV, UMC Streaming, Bounce TV, and independent production companies. She most recently served as a Story Editor on Covenant on AMC's ALLBLK. AZ doesn’t just teach you how to craft a story. She teaches you how to bring your voice to the forefront, tailoring your script to your authentic voice so that it stands out. By the end of the four lessons, you’ll have functional skills to develop your craft with pacing, authentic storytelling, build your writing muscles, and understand screenwriting essentials. Any script that successfully applies these lessons using their own unique voice will have the skills to write a memorable script that keeps executives turning those pages.  

How to Write a Fresh, Stand Out Comedy

Learn directly from Melissa Daykin Cassill, Vice President of State Street Pictures (Faster, Beauty Shop, Barbershop, Notorious, Nothing Like The Holidays) The Hangover, Bridesmaids, Little Miss Sunshine. What is it, exactly, that makes these comedies stand out from the crowd? With so many different types of comedies in the marketplace, it is becoming the toughest genre to break into. More executives are turning to A list comedians to write than actual screenwriters, so how do you get an executive's attention? How do you get past executives that have different senses of humor, jokes that don't translate internationally, and storylines that can easily get deemed outdated a year later? Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you our 4 week online intensive class How To Write A Fresh, Stand Out Comedy taught by the Vice President of State Street Pictures, Melissa Dayin Cassill. In this hands on 4 week course, you will learn the importance of the emotional crescendo of a comedy script, how to balance the comedy with the humanity of the characters, and how to pitch your comedy script once you're ready, all while molding your pages under Melissa's supervision. With interactive lectures and weekly homework assignments directly geared towards strengthening your pages, this class will help you craft your writing into a fresh stand out comedy script that will grab executives' attention! Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class. Although Melissa is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate.

Developing and Packaging Your Mini Series

Learn directly from Development & Production Executive Jake Detharidge, a feature film executive that has recently made a splash into the mini-series space with projects set up at History Channel, Spike, and MGM! "Jake's feedback is so valuable. I enjoy every webinar and class Jake does. He's always informative and always presents information in a very smart and succinct way. Great webinars/classes..." - R. Canty "Seldom have I met execs in LA who know what they're talking about but don't throw around their ego. Jake loves the process, nice perspective with a positive spin." N. Kellis "This was one of the more beneficial seminars with current relative information in the industry. Really enjoyed it." - M. McLinn In this Stage 32 Webinar, host Jake Detharidge will first take you through a brief history of the ‘Mini Series’ in the US, along with analyzing the current television marketplace (Event Series vs. Limited Series vs. Mini Series), and why this platform is experiencing resurgence. After, Jake will break down the creative and development process for several different, current projects, to help you understand and identify the right stories, IP and general concepts that are viable right now. This will make up the bulk of the webinar, breaking down the creative/development/packaging process, in hopes that any and all who attend will leave with a formidable understanding of how they might create their very own compelling Mini-Series project. Don’t get confined to one narrative structure, feature or TV series, look for bold new ways to tell stories – the possibilities are endless! You Will Leave The Webinar Knowing: What exactly is a Mini-Series, versus a Limited Series and Event Series and why each is unique? Why did the ‘Mini-Series’ disappear for the most part from US television and why is it now making a strong comeback? What is the current landscape for this platform – the nuts and bolts. The major companies and players around town currently looking for these types of projects and what moves the needle for them. Narrative Basics – what and why certain stories, ideas and concepts are better suited for a mini-series versus the traditional feature film or scripted television series. What types of IP you should be looking for and how you can obtain the rights to potentially develop it. Developing – what goes into this step and exactly how much…or how little…do you need before trying to sell, and where to sell. Packaging – what the process is for a mini-series, and what elements you can attach to add value that are obtainable. Outside the box ideas!' Your host Jake Detharidge will take you through the realities and pitfalls of navigating the exciting resurgence of a classic narrative platform. Jakes comes primarily from a feature film background, but he recognized – along with the rest of the industry – the creative domination currently taking place in television and forged a way to put his skill sets to work. He has developed, packaged and set up half a dozen mini-series projects with more on the way. Through his unique viewpoint on narrative structure and current audience viewing trends, Jake believes the Mini-Series resurgence is only just beginning.

Sketch Comedy Lab: Write Your Sketch + Table Read it & Get Notes

This is an interactive virtual 2-part class with Jeff and a small group of sketch comedy writers 10 spots available - 6 spots remain!   Short form comedy sketch content has helped propel the careers of some of the top creatives we see in film and TV today like Amy Poehler, Ben Stiller, Kristen Wiig, Will Ferrel and many more. A quick laugh is one of the best ways for you to endear yourself to a fellow creative or a decision maker looking to produce or buy your work. Having a quick-wit shows that you have the comedic chops to entertain an audience in long form, which is why you see so many people trying their hand at sketch comedy on You Tube, Instagram, Tik Tok, in comedy troops and more. The opportunities are plentiful! But, how do you know if a sketch you write is funny? How do you know if the joke you envision will hit the right mark? It takes a lot of practice - and within that practice there will be some good and some bad sketches. Not every joke is going to hit, but the more you get the hang of how to write sketches the funnier they will become. And, as you know, sometimes writing can be insular so it's important that you get feedback from fellow comedy lovers to help you improve your work and get it to hit. We are here to help you with that support. We are giving you the opportunity to work directly with one of the top sketch comedy artists in the game right now, Jeff Galante. Jeff is an actor/comedian/writer is based out of the Groundlings Theater where he is a senior performer and teacher. He has sold pilots to NBC, A&E and has worked with SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE, WARNER BROS., WANDA SYKES', NATIONAL LAMPOON, 2 BROKE GIRLS and many more.  In an exclusive 2-part interactive class Jeff will teach you all the fundamentals about writing sketch comedy. After your first class you will be assigned to write your own sketch based off of what you've learned. Then, in the next class, Jeff and your group will table read each other's sketches and you will get invaluable insight on how you can continually improve your sketch!   You will not find access like this anywhere else except through Stage 32! This class is limited so make sure to sign up today!     Some Praise About Jeff's Previous Class "Great host, great info, long time interest in the topic with no practical knowledge so this was so much fun!"- Jeremy S. "I loved everything about it. I wish it was longer." - Gayle R.  "Excellent information, excellent presenter - authentic and hard-working" -Scott T.  "I liked the specificity and the real world, scenarios and brutally honest information about the business." - Roger C. 

How to Handle Guild Residual Payments For Your Film Production - with Free Agreement Downloads

If a film production is going to use talent that belongs to a guild, you will need to adhere to labor related matters when it comes to residuals. Residuals are how you pay your guild talent and a key component of any production. These payments have a strict way in which they need to be handled in order to make sure that your talent is being compensated properly - whether it's payment upfront or payment on the backend. Conversely, if you are in a guild you need to ensure that your contract lays out the correct components with residuals to make sure that you are paid properly.  Whether you are the person paying or the person receiving, we're talking about money here and you don't want to get it wrong. Understanding residual payments in some of the world's key film markets (US, UK and Canada) is vital to your production. As you are putting together your budget and ensuring that your production comes in at or under your budget you have to know how residuals work. Working with guilds can be tricky, but as long as you are clear upfront on how to pay their members and how that flows into your budget you can ensure success. And, if you're talent that belongs to a guild you want to ensure that you are getting every payment that is owed to you for your service on a project.  David Zannoni is an international business specialist for Fintage House in the US, Europe, Canada and Latin America territories. Fintage House, the world's most respected company for revenue and rights protection for industry professionals and companies. David negotiates agreements for films and television series and is involved in business development and relationship management globally on hundreds of productions. David is continuously present to make deals and speak at international film markets, festivals and conferences, including: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Europe, and all over Latin America. David will teach you what exactly residuals are and go over a comparison of them in the USA, Canada and the United Kingdom. He will go into a deep dive example on a US example where he will discuss options for payments of residuals and how the calculation works. You will understand how the payment for residuals is secured in security interest, the collection account or the payroll house. He will even go over the agreements you should know that are related to residual payments. He will even dive into residual and media allocation and the recoupment schedule. You will leave with a clear understanding of how residuals work and how to best protect yourself on both sides when dealing with them. With this webinar you will receive free template downloads: DGA Basic Agreement SAG AFTRA Security Agreement SAG AFTRA Standard Agreement SAG AFTRA Television Distributors Assumption Agreement SAG AFTRA Television Buyers Assumption Agreement WGA Theatrical and Television Basic Agreement Standard CAM Agreement International Multi-picture Rights Distribution License Agreement Sample Webinar Resource Sheet   Praise for David's Previous Stage 32 Webinars   "David is incredible and lovely and clearly knows his stuff." - Cynthia P.   "Eye-opening information. A no-brainer approach that wouldn't be so obvious to the uninitiated." - Gary O.   "By far, the best class I've seen on the subject." Kirk K.   "David is a fantastic teacher. And what a voice! I could listen to him all day. More importantly, I learned so very much!" - Isabella T.

How to Make the Transition from Cinematographer to Director

Getting ahead is hard in Hollywood, and taking the next step in your career can be difficult when it feels like the expectation is for you to stay in your own lane. Being a cinematographer is such an exciting, rewarding, and important role on any project, but that doesn’t mean it’s where your journey has to stop. If you have aspirations to move into directing and make your own film, that path is more possible than you might think. In fact, your background as a cinematographer might even catapult you to this position, since, in an effort to save film funds, it’s becoming more common for producers to hire cinematographers who can also direct. Many people believe that the roles of the director and cinematographer are separate, but actually they are partners in the storytelling process. This means that making the leap from cinematographer to director is not as hard as you might think. However, whether you want to exclusively direct or be a DP / director combo, you have to adhere to a certain mode of operation, master the art of collaboration, and hone your ability to speak clearly to your cast and crew in order to maximize your time on set. So how do you get that first directing job? Can you effectively direct and shoot at the same time, and if so, how do you divide your precious time between your cast and crew? With careful planning and a solid understanding of how to manage your responsibilities on set you can become the perfect “double threat” that producers love, while putting extra cash in your pocket and achieving more of your creative goals. Ryan Little is a director, producer, and cinematographer with over 20 years of experience in the industry. His first feature SAINTS AND SOLDIERS, for which he took on the dual roles of DP and director, won 16 “Best Picture” awards and two nominations at the Independent Spirit Awards including Best First Feature and Best Cinematography. Since then, Ryan has served as cinematographer and director on a slew of projects and has directed actors like Danny Glover, Vinnie Jones, Sean Astin, Neal McDonagh, Gary Cole, Dolph Lundgren, and Mickey Rourke. Most recently Ryan has worked with Producer Dean Devlin on the TNT pilot BLANK SLATE and has directed TV episodes of shows like GRANITE FLATS and EXTINCT. Ryan has built a storied background and deep well of knowledge in both cinematography and directing, and is ready to share what he knows with the Stage 32 community.   Using his own experience as well as his deep understanding of the industry today, Ryan will teach you how you can make the transition from cinematographer to director and use your photography background to your advantage. He will begin by broadly discussing the prospect of switching from cinematographer to director and explaining why it’s possible. He will go over how he made the transition himself as well how other notable directors made a similar shift. He will demonstrate why your background as a DP will actually make you a better director yourself. Ryan will then delve more deeply into how best to land your first job as a director, including “planting seeds” for future opportunities, playing to your strengths as a practiced cinematographer, using the connections you’ve already built, and how to create sample work to help show your value. He will also discuss the possibility of serving as a Director/DP combo on set as a way to break in, what that looks like, and how to do both roles effectively at the same time. Next, Ryan will give you the rundown of how to best tackle your first directing gig. He’ll go over the aspects of directing you can expect to come naturally and the aspects that might be more of a challenge because of your background, as well as how to let the DP role go when directing. Ryan will teach you how to best prep for your first directing gig before going on set. He’ll talk about how to create your “style guide” for the project, finding your story moments ahead of time, making a useful shot list, and how best to use storyboards. He will then talk about how to spend your time on set as a director, including how to manage your time and break up your day and how to tell the story in your coverage. He will reveal three mistakes commonly made by directors during rehearsal and will discuss when the right and wrong times to operate the camera yourself are. He will also go over finding the balance between assertive and collaborative on set and how to set the right tone. Finally Ryan will focus on working with actors from the mindset of a cinematographer, including how to speak the actor’s language, how to hold the essential one-on-one actor preproduction meeting, and what you can do to become an “Actor’s Director”. Through all of this, Ryan will give you the tools and confidence to make the switch you might have been contemplating for a while and take the next important steps on your journey to become a bona fide film director.     "I attribute a lot of my success to my background as a cinematographer. It's given me so many great opportunities and the skills to advance in my career in exciting ways. I want other cinematographers to better understand their value and potential as filmmakers, and am so excited to share what I know to empower the current DPs and future directors that are part of the Stage 32 community." -Ryan Little

register for stage 32 Register / Log In