Advanced Directing Class: How to Plan and Execute Your Shoot

Taught by Clay Liford

$199

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Class hosted by: Clay Liford

Award-Winning Independent Filmmaker, SLASH (SXSW), MY MOM SMOKES WEED (Sundance)

Clay Liford is an award winning independent filmmaker and director of photography whose projects have premiered at Sundance Film Festival, SXSW, Munich, AFI Film fest and more. As a director of photography, Clay has shot over twenty-five features, including the SXSW award-winning films ST. NICK and GAYBY. His film credits also include WUSS, EARTHLING, SLASH, and MY MOM SMOKES WEED, a Sundance Film Festival favorite. As an indie filmmaker, editor, and writer, Clay has mastered the art of pre-production and production so that his projects move like clockwork. And as a film production instructor at the University of Texas, Clay has become proficient at teaching his methods for efficiency and artistic self-sufficiency. Now he’s sharing what he knows with the Stage 32 community. Full Bio »

Summary

Advanced and in-depth 2-part interactive directing class with award-winning SXSW and Sundance director Clay Liford

Learn how to handle shot coverage, scheduling, and time management on set!

 

Perhaps the biggest challenge for any director, new or experienced, big budget or small, film or TV, is making your day, and ensuring you're efficiently getting the footage and performances you need so you don't go over schedule and over budget. This is difficult, but there’s a proven method to keep you on track, while still allowing for inspiration and experimentation on set. It also happens to be the industry standard, and applies to any level of filmmaking - from student short to studio feature. It comes down to identifying what to plan and what to improvise. The truth is the more you plan, the more you’re free to experiment while filming - provided you optimize your time and focus on the right elements.

Let's go deep into how exactly to plan your day so you can do your job on set, stay in control, stay creative, and leave with the best possible film you can make.

Clay Liford is an award winning independent filmmaker and director of photography whose projects have premiered at Sundance Film Festival, SXSW, Munich, AFI Film fest and more. As a director of photography, Clay has shot over twenty-five features, including the SXSW award-winning films ST. NICK and GAYBY. His film credits also include WUSS, EARTHLING, SLASH, and MY MOM SMOKES WEED, a Sundance Film Festival favorite. As an indie filmmaker, editor, and writer, Clay has mastered the art of pre-production and production so that his projects move like clockwork. And as a film production instructor at the University of Texas, Clay has become proficient at teaching his methods for efficiency and artistic self-sufficiency. Now he’s sharing what he knows with the Stage 32 community.

In this intensive and interactive 2-part class, Clay will work closely with you and show you how you can save time and money as a filmmaker by employing strategies and practices to make your day and keep your project moving. Focusing on both pre-production and production, Clay will walk you through how exactly to plan your days on set, address where to place emphasis in your pre-production process, and lay out a specific method for planning shots and scenes, which includes shot lists and top-down lighting plots. Along the way, Clay will provide invaluable handouts and case studies.

 

 

Praise for Clay's Previous Stage 32 Webinars

 

"Excellent - granular and practical, not just theoretical."

-Peter C.

 

"Clay was amazing. Would love to take more classes from him"

-Jacqueline A. 

 

"I was impressed with Clay. He has what feels like a natural gift for teaching from a comfortable and personal level"

-Maeve T.

 

 

What You'll Learn

Session 1: Pre-Production

    • How To Shot List Efficiently, Using Agreed Upon Industry Language (so There’s Never Any Confusion as to What You Want)
    • Access to a Master Menu Of Shot Options/Components, Infinitely Combinable To Create Virtually any Possible Shot - No Matter How Outlandish or Unique - Easily and Accurately
    • How to Get the Lighting You Want Using Simplified Lighting Plots Based on the Simple Concept of “Value Ratios,” Rather Than the Mastery of Niche Technical Knowledge
    • Learn to Optimize And Simplify Technical Communication With Your Key Department Heads
    • Discover What Director “Homework” Is Actually Productive. Don’t Spin Your Wheels!
    • How To Split Your Duties as a Director, and How Much of the Job Truly Is Just Good Team Building.
    • Splitting Your Duties as A Director
    • Q&A with Clay

 

Session 2: Production

  • Operating on Set
    • The step-by-step process to follow in order to maximize your on-set time
    • The method to re-focus you from “chasing the clock” and back onto creative decision making
    • How to work efficiently, rather than quickly (i.e. rushed)
    • How to ensure you still get everything you need when time inevitably runs low
    • How to identify “happy accidents” and other inspirational opportunities that only arise when you’re actually filming.
    • How to maximize the beautifully collaborative aspect of filmmaking
  • Think Like an Editor
    • Minimizing your need for future “pick ups” and additional shooting by getting what you need the first time.
    • What proper “coverage” truly means
    • What every editor wishes directors and producers would deliver
    • How to get the most out of your “shooting ratio”
  • Q&A with Clay Liford

 

WHAT TO EXPECT:

  • This class is designed for intermediate and advanced directors and filmmakers looking to learn how to better cover scenes for a film or television show and plan their day. This is an in-depth, practical, and detailed class with significantly more content than a standard 90-minute webinar.
  • This class will consist of two sessions, both roughly two hours in duration and spaced one day apart from one another. In addition to the presentation-style lessons where Clay will be walking you through various elements of the directing, you will have the opportunity to ask him questions during each session.

About Your Instructor

Clay Liford is an award winning independent filmmaker and director of photography whose projects have premiered at Sundance Film Festival, SXSW, Munich, AFI Film fest and more. As a director of photography, Clay has shot over twenty-five features, including the SXSW award-winning films ST. NICK and GAYBY. His film credits also include WUSS, EARTHLING, SLASH, and MY MOM SMOKES WEED, a Sundance Film Festival favorite. As an indie filmmaker, editor, and writer, Clay has mastered the art of pre-production and production so that his projects move like clockwork. And as a film production instructor at the University of Texas, Clay has become proficient at teaching his methods for efficiency and artistic self-sufficiency. Now he’s sharing what he knows with the Stage 32 community.

Schedule

Session 1: Pre-Production - Monday October 11, 2021, 4pm-6pm PDT

Session 2: Production - Tuesday October 12, 2021, 4pm-6pm PDT

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class. If you cannot attend a live class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. Plus, your instructor will be available via email throughout the lab.

Q: Will I have access to the lab afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of the lab, you will have on-demand access to the video recording, which you can view for one month after the class is complete.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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