Stage 32 Screenwriting Lab: Write Your 1 Hour Pilot for Streaming Networks in 8 Weeks

Payment plans available - contact Harrison at h.glaser@stage32.com for details
Taught by Charlie Osowik

$799
Lab Schedule (8 sessions):
Sunday, Jun 27TH 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Jul 11TH 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Jul 18TH 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Jul 25TH 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Aug 1ST 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Aug 8TH 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Aug 15TH 11AM - 1PM PDT
Sunday, Aug 22ND 11AM - 1PM PDT
Starts in:
Sorry. This lab is fully sold out.

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Charlie Osowik

Literary Manager at Osowik Management

Charlie Osowik is a literary manager who began his career at top international sales companies such as FilmNation, Sierra/Affinity and Voltage, amongst others. He later worked in the office of the CEO of MGM. After two years there, he went on to work for a partner in the feature literary department at Gersh, where he stayed for another two years. It was there that he realized his passion for guiding writers and directors could be turned into a career. In June 2018 he established his own company, Charles Osowik Management. He currently has a writer staffed as Story Editor on her second year on the hit HBOMax Fantasy Adventure series DOOM PATROL, while Gunpowder & Sky released a film by his writer/director client on their sci-fi platform DUST in 2018. That film is now being developed as a series with a production company, which he is executive producing. He also has a number of production companies attached to other projects in development. He is a firm believer in quality over quantity, loves ideas and surrounds himself with people who deeply connect with what they do.     Client credits include: Full Bio »

Summary

Sorry, this lab is fully sold out. Keep checking back for upcoming labs and other education!

 

Do you have a great idea for a show? No more stalling and no more excuses. It’s time to write it.

If you have a show in your head that is perfect for a streaming network like Netflix, Amazon, HBO Max or Hulu, you’ve picked a fantastic time to get that show out there. Streamers are picking up content and considering new work more than they ever have before. They are ready to see your show, but you need to write it first.

Creating a fantastic hour-long series is fully within your reach. Yet many writers stop before they even start because they get overwhelmed, procrastinate, or feel the dreaded imposter syndrome setting in. We know what that’s like, which is why we’ve created a program that will give you the structure, the accountability, and the guidance you need to actually get that pilot out of your head on paper.

Over 8 intensive weeks, you will be able to work closely with top literary manager Charlie Osowik in order to fully prepare, outline and write the pilot script for your own TV series.

Charlie is no stranger to this process and has helped his clients develop their own shows for networks like Comedy Central and Dust and use their pilot samples to get staffed on popular streaming shows like HBO Max’s DOOM PATROL. Charlie knows how to help bring the best work out of writers and will use this process to help you develop your own show.

 

Get the support and structure you need to finally write that pilot script before the summer ends.

 

Throughout the course of this exclusive online lab, you will have direct access to Charlie as a mentor by email and via video conferencing as you write your pilot.

 


WHAT TO EXPECT

  • By the end of this 8-week writing lab, you will have a completed hour-long television pilot script ready to be shown to reps, development execs and other executives and professionals.
  • Sessions will vary between 2-hour group settings and personal one-on-one Zoom meetings with Charlie. You will be held accountable to take the lessons from each week and move your work forward.
  • Plus, to keep you motivated and inspired, you will have access to a private, dedicated Stage 32 Lounge where you can communicate with your fellow classmates throughout the writing process.
  • To see the full writing lab schedule, see below under "What You Will Learn".

 

PLEASE NOTE: This exclusive Stage 32 lab is limited to 10 writers and will be booked on a first come, first served basis. The opportunity to work this closely and for this long with a manager and an expert in the field is an incredibly unique and valuable opportunity. If you are interested, please do book quickly. Once the spots are gone, they’re gone for good.

  • Payment plans are available - please contact Harrison at h.glaser@stage32.com for more information
  • This lab is limited to 10 people
  • This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea or polish an existing pilot.

What You'll Learn

WEEK 1 – Introduction, Elements of a TV Series

This week we will cover the syllabus, your goals for this lab and launch into a discussion of what elements you have to create for a successful pilot/sample. Some of the topics discussed will be:

  • Story engine
  • Setting
  • Research
  • Likeable vs. Relatable Characters
  • Effective Antagonists
  • Themes
  • Ensembles vs. Star vehicles
  • Finding your "template show"

The assignments for this week will be:

  • Write a half-page description of the concept of the pilot you intend to write.
  • Find a template for your pilot
  • Write a detailed description (around half a page) on each of your series regular characters

 

WEEK 2 – Pilot Structure and Story Mapping

This week we will discuss the function of a beat outline.

Topics that will be covered:

  • Pilot structure
  • plot and subplots
  • Episodic vs. serialized pilots
  • Pacing
  • Stakes
  • Mystery/suspense/anticipation
  • The reason to use act breaks even for a streaming sample
  • Page counts
  • Appropriate number of characters
  • Budget and production considerations

 

The assignment for this week will be to write a beat outline for your pilot.

 

WEEK 3 – Pilot Outline Consultations

This week will consist of one-on-one consultations regarding pilot structure. Each writer will send in their pilot outline in advance and will have a remote consultation to discuss what works and what doesn’t.

 

  • The assignment for the week is to address any notes given on the outline before proceeding

 

WEEK 4 – Acts One and Two

This week we will go over all the necessary story beats that exist in Acts 1 and 2 of a drama pilot.

Topics that will be covered:

  • World-building
  • "rules of the universe"
  • Establishing character
  • setting tone
  • Creating a launch point for your pilot
  • Elements of a strong teaser
  • Creating high stakes and tension
  • How and when to draw out the most unique  elements of your pilot in the first 10 pages

 

  • The assignment this week will be to complete Acts 1 and 2 of your pilot.

 

WEEK 5– Writing Effective Scenes

We will discuss how to craft dense, efficient scenes.

Topics that will be covered:

  • Structure of a scene
  • Building stakes
  • Multi-function scenes that move plot forward, reveal character, AND build the world
  • Avoiding “dead” scenes
  • How to enter and leave scenes
  • Moving from scene to scene using character motivations
  • Writing visually
  • Nuanced dialogue and the value of subtext.

 

  • The assignment this week will be to continue writing.

 

WEEK 6 – Pilot Acts One and Two Consultations

This week will consist of one-on-one consultations regarding the first half of your pilot. Each writer will send in their draft in advance and will have a phone consultation to discuss what works and what doesn’t.

 

  • The assignment for the week is to address any notes given.

 

WEEK 7– Acts Three, Four and Five

We will cover the necessary story beats that traditionally exist in acts 3 – 4 or 5 of a drama pilot.

Topics that will be covered:

  • Building subplots
  • Increasing layers and complexity
  • Making sure every character has a place in the puzzle and begins an arc
  • Writing dense scenes that move the story forward as well as reveal character.
  • How to create a series launch point at the end of your pilot
  • Common pilot writing mistakes.

 

  • The assignment this week will be to complete the first draft of the entire pilot.

 

WEEK 8 – Finished Pilot Consultations

This week will consist of one-on-one consultations on your first draft. Each writer will send in their first draft in advance and will have a phone consultation to go over notes.

About Your Instructor

Charlie Osowik is a literary manager who began his career at top international sales companies such as FilmNation, Sierra/Affinity and Voltage, amongst others. He later worked in the office of the CEO of MGM. After two years there, he went on to work for a partner in the feature literary department at Gersh, where he stayed for another two years. It was there that he realized his passion for guiding writers and directors could be turned into a career.

In June 2018 he established his own company, Charles Osowik Management. He currently has a writer staffed as Story Editor on her second year on the hit HBOMax Fantasy Adventure series DOOM PATROL, while Gunpowder & Sky released a film by his writer/director client on their sci-fi platform DUST in 2018. That film is now being developed as a series with a production company, which he is executive producing. He also has a number of production companies attached to other projects in development. He is a firm believer in quality over quantity, loves ideas and surrounds himself with people who deeply connect with what they do.

 

 

Client credits include:

Charlie OsowikCharlie OsowikCharlie OsowikCharlie Osowik

Schedule

SESSION 1 – Introduction, Elements of a TV Series - 6/27/21

(week break)

SESSION 2 – Pilot Structure and Story Mapping - 7/11/21

SESSION 3 – Pilot Outline Consultations (One on One Consultations – No Online Class)

SESSION 4 – Acts One and Two - 7/25/21

SESSION 5– Writing Effective Scenes - 8/1/21

SESSION 6 – Pilot Acts One and Two Consultations (One on One Consultations – No Online Class)

SESSION 7– Acts Three, Four and Five - 8/15/21

SESSION 8 – Finished Pilot Consultations (One on One Consultations – No Online Class)

 

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a lab?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live lab class?
A: If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class. If you cannot attend a live class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. Plus, your instructor will be available via email throughout the lab.

Q: Will I have access to the lab afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of the lab, you will have on-demand access to the video recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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