The Rewrite Process: What Do I Cut?

Getting The Executive to Read Your Script in One Sitting
Taught by Lee Stobby

$199

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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This Next Level Education class has a 93% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Lee Stobby

Manager at Lee Stobby Management

About Your Instructor, Lee Stobby: Lee Stobby is a literary manager and producer who has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media. A champion of strong, independent voices and quality cinema, Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, and his clients include: Lindsay Stidham who wrote Sundance hit Douchebag and Spooner, Kate Trefry whose script Pure O made The Black List 2013; Greg Sullivan whose script Erin's Voice made The Black List 2014; Isaac Adamson who is the author of Tokyo Suckerpunch and other books in the Billy Chaka series published by HarperCollins; and Rodney Ascher whose documentary Room 237 was the talk of Sundance and Cannes and is currently in post on his second feature The Nightmare, which was just selected for the midnight section of Sundance 2015. Full Bio »

Summary

To see a video sample of the class, see below!

3 part class taught by Lee Stobby, Manager and Founder of Lee Stobby Management! One of the most challenging parts as a writer is getting your story, ideas and dialogue into a script that is a respectable length. When you're looking at a completed draft that is facing a rewrite, how do you know what to cut? Many times you may think nothing can go without killing the story, but keeping the length is not always a good thing. A development executive's job role varies day to day and with a constant barrage of responsibility, longer scripts usually end up drowning to the bottom of the "to-read" pile. The truth is that executives sometimes even ask how long a script is before committing to read it. As a writer you will lose the battle if turning a page ends up being a struggle for any industry professional. Which brings up the very important question: what can be cut without sacrificing the heart of the script?

Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 3 part class: The Rewrite Process – What Do I Cut? taught by Lee Stobby, literary manager and founder of Lee Stobby Entertainment.

 

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Lee is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate!

What You'll Learn

Part 1 - Defining What Makes a Script Too Long

After a brief introduction, Lee discusses his personal experiences dealing with lengthy scripts and techniques he's used to work with writers on “trimming the fat” off their script. He then breaks down what executives really mean when they say “the script is too long”. Lee sheds light onto some common misconceptions and the do's and don'ts about length and more.

Part 2 - Analyzing Scenes and Defining Rules

Lee goes over his general rules of thumb, he then explores various tips and tricks to help tighten descriptions, action and dialogue. He covers the rules of description, setting up character and stakes in an efficient way and how to keep passages succinct and clear, as well as the do's and don'ts of effective dialogue and more.

Part 3 - Cutting into Scenes and Strengthening Your 30 Second Pitch

Lee gives advice on how to address notes while also making sure the page count doesn't grow needlessly. He continues with a discussion on pitching and the importance of a 30 second elevator pitch. Lastly, he gives advice on how to trim a pitch to make it as succinct as possible.

About Your Instructor

About Your Instructor, Lee Stobby:

Lee Stobby is a literary manager and producer who has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media. A champion of strong, independent voices and quality cinema, Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, and his clients include: Lindsay Stidham who wrote Sundance hit Douchebag and Spooner, Kate Trefry whose script Pure O made The Black List 2013; Greg Sullivan whose script Erin's Voice made The Black List 2014; Isaac Adamson who is the author of Tokyo Suckerpunch and other books in the Billy Chaka series published by HarperCollins; and Rodney Ascher whose documentary Room 237 was the talk of Sundance and Cannes and is currently in post on his second feature The Nightmare, which was just selected for the midnight section of Sundance 2015.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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