The Rewrite Process: What Do I Cut?

Getting The Executive to Read Your Script in One Sitting
Taught by Lee Stobby

$199

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

Rating   | Read reviews

Start Learning

Please make sure you use the same email address as the one you use to sign in to Stage 32
apply Your coupon will be applied after you agree to terms below.

- or -

$199.00
TOTAL PRICE:
Overlay Icon

This Next Level Education class has a 93% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Lee Stobby

Manager at Lee Stobby Management

About Your Instructor, Lee Stobby: Lee Stobby is a literary manager and producer who has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media. A champion of strong, independent voices and quality cinema, Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, and his clients include: Lindsay Stidham who wrote Sundance hit Douchebag and Spooner, Kate Trefry whose script Pure O made The Black List 2013; Greg Sullivan whose script Erin's Voice made The Black List 2014; Isaac Adamson who is the author of Tokyo Suckerpunch and other books in the Billy Chaka series published by HarperCollins; and Rodney Ascher whose documentary Room 237 was the talk of Sundance and Cannes and is currently in post on his second feature The Nightmare, which was just selected for the midnight section of Sundance 2015. Full Bio »

Summary

To see a video sample of the class, see below!

3 part class taught by Lee Stobby, Manager and Founder of Lee Stobby Management! One of the most challenging parts as a writer is getting your story, ideas and dialogue into a script that is a respectable length. When you're looking at a completed draft that is facing a rewrite, how do you know what to cut? Many times you may think nothing can go without killing the story, but keeping the length is not always a good thing. A development executive's job role varies day to day and with a constant barrage of responsibility, longer scripts usually end up drowning to the bottom of the "to-read" pile. The truth is that executives sometimes even ask how long a script is before committing to read it. As a writer you will lose the battle if turning a page ends up being a struggle for any industry professional. Which brings up the very important question: what can be cut without sacrificing the heart of the script?

Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 3 part class: The Rewrite Process – What Do I Cut? taught by Lee Stobby, literary manager and founder of Lee Stobby Entertainment.

 

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Lee is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate!

What You'll Learn

Part 1 - Defining What Makes a Script Too Long

After a brief introduction, Lee discusses his personal experiences dealing with lengthy scripts and techniques he's used to work with writers on “trimming the fat” off their script. He then breaks down what executives really mean when they say “the script is too long”. Lee sheds light onto some common misconceptions and the do's and don'ts about length and more.

Part 2 - Analyzing Scenes and Defining Rules

Lee goes over his general rules of thumb, he then explores various tips and tricks to help tighten descriptions, action and dialogue. He covers the rules of description, setting up character and stakes in an efficient way and how to keep passages succinct and clear, as well as the do's and don'ts of effective dialogue and more.

Part 3 - Cutting into Scenes and Strengthening Your 30 Second Pitch

Lee gives advice on how to address notes while also making sure the page count doesn't grow needlessly. He continues with a discussion on pitching and the importance of a 30 second elevator pitch. Lastly, he gives advice on how to trim a pitch to make it as succinct as possible.

About Your Instructor

About Your Instructor, Lee Stobby:

Lee Stobby is a literary manager and producer who has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media. A champion of strong, independent voices and quality cinema, Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, and his clients include: Lindsay Stidham who wrote Sundance hit Douchebag and Spooner, Kate Trefry whose script Pure O made The Black List 2013; Greg Sullivan whose script Erin's Voice made The Black List 2014; Isaac Adamson who is the author of Tokyo Suckerpunch and other books in the Billy Chaka series published by HarperCollins; and Rodney Ascher whose documentary Room 237 was the talk of Sundance and Cannes and is currently in post on his second feature The Nightmare, which was just selected for the midnight section of Sundance 2015.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Other education that may be of interest to you:

Screenwriters: The Real Reasons Why You’re Not Getting Signed

Learn directly from Lee Stobby whose clients include writers on films that have premiered at Sundance and Cannes, as well as a stable of multiple writers on the Black List! Stage 32 is here to give you an honest, no B.S. look at how managers actually approach signing writers, straight from the mouth of a respected Hollywood manager himself. If you’re looking for a sugarcoated opinion on why you haven’t been signed yet, this webinar isn’t for you, but if you’re serious about wanting to take your career to the next level and can handle the blunt and honest truth, buckle up and get ready to learn! In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, host Lee Stobby will provide insight into how he as a manager looks for material and clients. He will discuss the most common turn offs and red flags that kill his interest, even if he liked your script or writing (such as not in LA, “bad” personality, not having a script that is ready to go, or soft concepts). He will then go over ways to overcome these things and accent your strengths. You will learn what types of scripts play best on script hosting websites, how to utilize coverage services, how to get executives to read your script and subsequently refer to reps, how to write scripts that get attention in contests, other ways to get attention on your script, and why being in the relentless search of representation may not be the best use of your time. You will leave with a clear understanding of the mistakes you’ve been unknowingly making and directions on how to avoid continuing to make them, giving yourself a better chance of finally getting signed! Your host Lee Stobby has learned from some of Hollywood’s greatest minds at Misher Films, Double Feature Films, Industry Entertainment, Innovative Artists and Caliber Media; the lattermost is where he began representing literary clients in 2011. Lee is a champion of strong, independent voices and has a knack for finding some of the most in-demand spec scripts on the market. Lee just started his own shingle, Lee Stobby Entertainment, where his clients include writers on films that have premiered at Sundance and Cannes, as well as a stable of multiple writers on the Black List. Lee knows what makes a great client / writer and is here exclusively for Stage 32 to partake some of his knowledge, energy and passion to help writers increase their chances of finally getting representation.

How to Hook the Executive in the First 10-15 Pages

4 part class taught by Lee Stobby, literary manager and founder of Lee Stobby Entertainment! AVAILABLE ON DEMAND! Executives are busy. On average, a production company will have 10-30 projects in various stages of development and production. That's why the first 10-15 pages of your script are the most crucial. They must grab the executives attention, or lose it forever... most won't read past page 15 if they aren't sold on the story. Most writers don't have the tools to strengthen their beginning, and their scripts wind up getting overlooked... don't let this happen to you! Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 4 part class: How to Hook the Executive in the First 15 Pages taught by Lee Stobby literary manager and founder of Lee Stobby Entertainment. This class will give you the much needed tools to craft a killer opening to keep the executive engaged and excited about your script! Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.Although Lee is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate!

Deconstructing Oscar-Winning Films: Spotlight, Network & All The President's Men

Over the past few decades as the media landscape has changed, so have methods for reporting and information gathering. Your Stage 32 Next Level educator, award-winning director, James Kicklighter, has personally learned this while directing his new documentary film, Digital Edition, profiling the digital tools changing media as we know it. In “Deconstructing Oscar-Winning Films: Spotlight, Network & All The President’s Men,” we will evaluate and deconstruct common methods deployed in these three groundbreaking films to tell stories about journalism and media. Through this process, we will identify the successful techniques from these masterpieces for directing and writing movies about the media we consume.  While filmmaking isn’t typically thought about as “investigative,” to create a film about journalism and media, it requires extended research that goes beyond writing the fictional screenplay. We will evaluate the preparation process of interviewing industry professionals, utilizing research to inform the written narrative, and how to visually manifest the themes on screen. You will walk away learning techniques to help your directing, writing, acting and producing to help you improve your projects! As an added bonus  - ***Get 3 FREE Oscar-Winning Scripts: Spotlight, All The President's Men & Network***

10 Essential Elements to Incorporate Into Writing Your Rom Com

Part 1 – THE SET UP ELEMENTS A strong lead Our girl! Creating a compelling, three-dimensional character we want to spend two hours with. The love interest. Someone adorable and smart and hot – and perfect (but only for our leading lady – or lass). The best friend. A cooky, quirky, amazing foil (for an amazing character actress). A great hook. Coming up with an amazing logline, title, and concept Inherent conflict What’s the driving force of the story? How to come up with conflict so good that scenes write themselves? Part 2 – THE PLOT ELEMENTS and THE CRUCIAL ELEMENT The cute "meet". How to craft a perfect moment. The “Benny and the Jets” Moment. Stolen from 27 DRESSES, that moment when we see our leads bond. The moment after which there’s no turning back. The break apart Anxiety, tears, snot. Will they end up together or won’t they? How to make this moment feel real and earned? The epic moment The big kiss. The wedding. The perfect moment. A FRESH VOICE The crucial element. How to discover your own voice – and then use it!

8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab

Learn directly from Morgan Long, TV Literary Department for a “Big Six” Agency This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea. With the TV market exploding right now, one of the most in demand formats is the 1-hour TV drama pilot. Many, if not all, managers and agents are looking for writers that can write in this space, and with more and more production companies heading into TV, knowing how to write a strong 1-hour TV drama pilot will give you a competitive advantage and help you find success as a TV writer! Due to popular demand, Stage 32 is thrilled to bring back our 8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab taught by Morgan Long, a TV development coordinator at a “Big Six” Agency! This hands-on intensive lab will guide you through picking a concept, creating engaging characters, structuring and outlining your pilot and writing the first draft! The main objective of this 8-week lab will be to have a first draft of your script. You will meet online with Morgan for 2 hours a week in a class setting, plus have phone consultations during some of the weeks when you don't have an online class. This will be accompanied by weekly homework assignments to guide you on your way to creating a marketable, unique pilot that will grab the industry's attention. Payment plans are available - please contact julie@stage32.com for more information.  This Lab is Limited to 20 People. Please Note: Participating in this lab does not mean you are writing for or pitching to Morgan or her company.  PRE-CLASS PREP - Read your syllabus and plan out your writing ideas. Begin to think about 1-2 ideas that might be a good idea for your drama pilot. Start to prepare for your pilot pitch.

How To Find Distribution For Your Indie Film

When making an independent film, finishing the film is only half the battle. You need people to actually see the film you’ve worked so hard on. When it comes to distribution, it’s important to know how to get your film into the worldwide marketplace. Once it’s there, you need to know how to generate interest toward it so the film can make its money back for the investors and back-end participants. Distribution comes in all shapes and sizes, but what kind of distribution is right for your indie film? Sometimes it means getting your film distributed by a studio; sometimes it’s creating a self-distribution path. Sometimes —- most typically — the distribution lands somewhere in between. Every film is different and therefore requires a different marketing plan, release strategy, and team behind it that have the passion and drive to get the most out of its release amongst the myriad other movies available. In this on-demand Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, host Tiffany Boyle will get into the details of what the independent distribution process looks like. She will go over how to get the right representative, foreign sales agent, and domestic distribution, and the different options for each based upon the size, genre and execution of a film. She will also discuss what the key points are to look at when reviewing a foreign sales agent and/or domestic distribution deal. Filmmakers should be making an informed decision when choosing who will be handling the licensing of their film for the next 3-25 years, and Tiffany is here exclusively for Stage 32 to help you navigate the ever-evolving world of indie distribution. Tiffany Boyle is the President at Ramo Law and works with producers, financiers and writer clients to bring their new material to life. Having been a Director of Sales at Crystal Sky Pictures, Tiffany has an extensive background in foreign sales. She now works with the attorneys to review, collaborate, develop, submit and supervise creative materials on behalf of clients within the firm. Tiffany has worked on over 100 features including, Stuck In Love, Pawn, Gimme Shelter, Maladies, and I-Lived. She has been to AFM, Berlin, Tribeca, TIFF, Sundance, and Cannes and is constantly expanding her knowledge of how to match films with production and distribution companies.

register for stage 32 Register / Log In