The Ultimate Guide to Succeeding on YouTube

Taught by Brent Kado

$299

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Brent Kado

YouTube Educator, Certified from YouTube Space LA

Brent Kado is a filmmaker, screenwriter and educator from Chicago, Illinois. Brent is YouTube certified from YouTube Space in LA and is up-to-date on the current inner workings of YouTube with certification to teach. In addition, Brent has written, produced and directed 3 narrative feature films, 2 documentary and a variety of short film and web series, some screening on Amazon. He has a management deal with Collab and formerly with Studio 71. Brent is the Director of the Chicago Independent Film & TV Festival and the Chicago Comedy Film Festival. "A Renaissance man." Jessica Herman, Chicago Sun-Times."Astute vision." Bryant Manning, Entertainment Weekly."Chicago’s film scene is evolving thanks to the independent endeavors of Brent Kado." Reel Honest Reviews Full Bio »

Summary

With YouTube changing frequently, it's important to understand the ins and outs of this global platform.  After taking these 4 sessions you will: 

● Develop the ability to conceive of, develop, and produce original and engaging YouTube content.

● Gain proficiency in uploading & posting videos to their YouTube channel.

● Display a working knowledge of YouTube’s best practices & strategies to help build an audience on the YouTube platform by measuring subscribers, views and audience engagement via comments.

● Demonstrate the ability to measure video performance via YouTube Analytics, including user engagement, view reports and demographics.

● Develop an individualized artistic voice..

● Illustrate the concepts of the YouTube auteur culture via exposure to a series of web videos spotlighting successful YouTubers who’ve built a sizable audience and presence on the YouTube platform.

● Participate in the user-generated content (UGC) by gaining understanding of the largest user-driven video content provider in the world successfully built on the user-to-user social experience.. Also, understand YouTube Anthropologically, it's culture as not only a video platform but as a search engine and social media site.

What You'll Learn

Session One

  • Overview of Digital Video Ecosystem
  • Introduction to YouTube Playbook Programming, genres and trends
  • How to make engaging and shareable videos Popular Channel Assessment

Session Two

  • Channel Building
  • Optimization of channel
  • Get subscribers
  • Channel Trailer
  • Optimization practices for videos SEO for video on YouTube
  • Descriptions, tags, titles, thumbnails

Viral, Organic, Earned Views Info cards, end cards, playlists

Session Three

  • Audience Building
  • How to get viewers and fans
  • Collaborating, community growth, video marketing What motivates viewers
  • How to keep them coming back
  • Overview of Copyright
  • How to use analytics for audience

Session Four

  • Monetization
  • Best practices for videos
  • How to make more money
  • Use analytics for monetization Advertising success
  • Cross platform creating and promoting Future of online video

About Your Instructor

Brent Kado is a filmmaker, screenwriter and educator from Chicago, Illinois. Brent is YouTube certified from YouTube Space in LA and is up-to-date on the current inner workings of YouTube with certification to teach. In addition, Brent has written, produced and directed 3 narrative feature films, 2 documentary and a variety of short film and web series, some screening on Amazon. He has a management deal with Collab and formerly with Studio 71.

Brent is the Director of the Chicago Independent Film & TV Festival and the Chicago Comedy Film Festival.


"A Renaissance man." Jessica Herman, Chicago Sun-Times.

"Astute vision." Bryant Manning, Entertainment Weekly.

"Chicago’s film scene is evolving thanks to the independent endeavors of Brent Kado." Reel Honest Reviews

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