Writer Development Lab: From Concept to Ironclad Outline

Payment plans available - contact edu@stage32.com
Taught by Patrick Raymond, educator

$799

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Who Should Attend:

Screenwriters looking to develop a new script outline under the guidance of a working development executive.

This Next Level Education class has a 100% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Patrick Raymond, educator

Creative Executive at Mandalay Pictures

Patrick Raymond is a Creative Executive at Mandalay Pictures, Peter Gruber’s decades-old production company responsible for films such Sleepy Hollow, The Score, The Jacket, Into the Blue, When the Game Stands Tall and Horns. Patrick has been instrumental in the current slate of films such as Birth of a Nation, Burning Sands, Sniper: Ultimate Kill, When The Game Stands Tall, and Never Back Down). At Mandalay, Patrick gets to work on his passion every day: cultivating amazing stories and working with great writers.  Prior to joining Mandalay, Patrick studied business and film production at the University of Southern California. He worked in the financial services industry for four years before transitioning to entertainment, where he worked as a production assistant in television for four years.After that he transitioned to working at Gersh in the production department but he also gained exposure to the literary world, working with writers and story. He then moved over to LD Entertainment for three years, where he was a Creative Executive, working with writers and helping build scripts and acquire ideas for new projects. Here he had the opportunity to work for Tate Taylor on a James Brown biopic entitled, Get On Up, and learned about assembling large studio films. He has since transitioned to the Creative Executive position at Mandalay Pictures. Patrick was born in Alaska and raised in Seattle prior to moving to LA. Full Bio »

Summary

WEEK #1 – The Story of Me; Your Questions; Your Stories

  • General class overview.
  • Patrick's history and experiences.
  • What Patrick loves writing about and why.
  • What he looks for in a good story/screenplay.
  • Any initial queries raised in the pre-class questionnaire.

NOTE: Given the online format, Patrick will use this week’s “office hours” to more personally respond to/discuss the ideas you are contemplating working on during the Lab.

WEEK #2 – Character

  • Creating strong, unique memorable characters.
  • How to have them best serve your story, the genre, themes, etc.
  • Dialogue and voice.

Patrick will cover some examples, including personal experience.

WEEK #3 – Act I; Premise into Story

  • How to make the leap from basic premise/concept and characters into a full-blooded story.
  • Where to start.
  • What to include in Act 1.
  • Where does Act 1 end and Act 2 begin?
  • Creating a world and setting a tone.

Patrick will discuss examples of strong (attention-grabbing and/or smartly-chosen) and weak (meandering, overstuffed, unfocused, etc.) beginnings.

WEEK #4 – The Story So Far (Consultation)

No on-line class this week. Instead, you will submit premise, Character Bio(s), and Act I outline for review; Patrick will discuss the materials individually in 30 minute phone calls and advise any changes/concerns.

WEEK #5 – Act II; Structure and Plotting

  • Plotting and development of your story across Act 2.
  • Examples of structure (midpoints, end of Act 2, Internal/external conflict, etc.

WEEK #6 – Theme; What’s it All About?

  • How to ensure that your script isn’t just an escalation of events, but is a rich narrative experience that is hopefully actually about something.
  • Topics to include Theme, Topicality, Relatability, Universality.

WEEK #7 – Act III; Sticking the Landing

  • Why 'when and how' to achieve a strong finish is arguably one of the most difficult parts of writing a screenplay.
  • Examples of scripts/films that have accomplished this, as well as those that have not (and why).

WEEK #8 – The Completed Outline (Consultation)

No on-line class this week. Instead, you will turn in your completed outline for review; Patrick will then discuss with you over a 30-minute consultation.

 

The Objective of the Lab is:

  • To take the mystery work out of picking a concept that can sell.
  • To match you with an executive that will assist you with making sure all your script's elements is as strong as possible.
  • Give you an experience on how development executives develop projects that are now on their company's slate.

What You'll Learn

***Payment plans are available. Contact edu@stage32.com for more information***

Stage 32 is thrilled to bring back our 8 Week Writer Development Lab to give you the chance to have access to a great mentor. Your mentor for this lab will be Sundance-Award winning Creative Executive, Patrick Raymond, from Mandalay Pictures who's worked on films such as Birth of a Nation and Netflix's Burning Sands.  Patrick has assisted a number of our writers on strengthening their scripts and he is excited to help you bring your concept to life.

This class is very interactive and will consist of interactive online lectures with Patrick, weekly homework assignments directly geared towards bringing your concept to life, an ongoing online writers group for support, PLUS ongoing contact with Patrick in between classes. Your experience writing has never been easier. If you have to miss an online class - don't worry! It will recorded and you can view at your convenience!

Want to learn more about Patrick? Check out his panel for National Screenwriters Day: 

Under The Guidance of Patrick Raymond you will:

  • Pick a unique and commercially viable concept.
  • Craft engaging, unique characters that pop off the page.
  • Create a solid structural script skeleton that successfully carries your concept.
  • Develop cinematic set pieces that will give your story that much-wanted theatrical feel.
  • Leave with a fully realized outline highlighting every major plot point in your script.

About Your Instructor

Patrick Raymond is a Creative Executive at Mandalay Pictures, Peter Gruber’s decades-old production company responsible for films such Sleepy Hollow, The Score, The Jacket, Into the Blue, When the Game Stands Tall and Horns. Patrick has been instrumental in the current slate of films such as Birth of a Nation, Burning Sands, Sniper: Ultimate Kill, When The Game Stands Tall, and Never Back Down). At Mandalay, Patrick gets to work on his passion every day: cultivating amazing stories and working with great writers. 

Prior to joining Mandalay, Patrick studied business and film production at the University of Southern California. He worked in the financial services industry for four years before transitioning to entertainment, where he worked as a production assistant in television for four years.After that he transitioned to working at Gersh in the production department but he also gained exposure to the literary world, working with writers and story. He then moved over to LD Entertainment for three years, where he was a Creative Executive, working with writers and helping build scripts and acquire ideas for new projects. Here he had the opportunity to work for Tate Taylor on a James Brown biopic entitled, Get On Up, and learned about assembling large studio films. He has since transitioned to the Creative Executive position at Mandalay Pictures. Patrick was born in Alaska and raised in Seattle prior to moving to LA.

Schedule

Week 1 - Monday, January 29, 2018 4pm-5pm PST

Week 2 - Monday, February 5, 2018 4pm-5pm PST

Week 3 - Monday, February 12, 2018

(please note the February 19, 2018 week is skipped due to President’s Day holiday)

Week 4 - Monday, February 26, 2018 4pm-5pm PST (no online class this week, one-on-one consultations)

Week 5 - Monday, March 5, 2018 4pm-5pm PST

Week 6 - Monday, March 12, 2018 4pm-5pm PST

Week 7 - Monday, March 19, 2018 4pm-5pm PST

Week 8 - Monday, March 26, 2018 4pm-5pm PST (no online class this week, one-on-one consultations)

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

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