Animation : Animation Price Guide by Christian Nommay

Christian Nommay

Animation Price Guide

One of my friends working in animation sent me this link today that helps to estimate the cost of an animated project. Of course, it's not perfect, but being able to have a rough estimation can be quite useful. It looks like there is also an estimation tool for freelancers.

https://getwrightonit.com/animation-price-guide/

Animation Price Guide and 3D VFX Cost Calculator
Animation Price Guide and 3D VFX Cost Calculator
Estimate the cost of animation projects for different mediums, styles, quality and duration using our interactive instant animation price calculator. Use this price guide to calculate a ballpark figur…
Maurice Vaughan

Hey, Christian Nommay. Thanks. I've used this calculator before.

Karen "Kay" Ross

Thanks for sharing! I've seen it before too, but I'd LOVE to discuss what changes the quality from television (low) to film (high). The resolution? Packaging (with a series it costs less because you are reserving time in bulk)? Let's unpack these numbers a bit!

Martin Reese

I've recently used it bookmarked. Now I have some idea of what my short will cost based on what what style of animation I decide to go with.

Bob Harper

It seems like an interesting tool to start the discussion of budget. Do we know what the numbers are based on? I have shopped a project around to different studios from around the world have gotten a wide range of pricing.

Martin Reese

I feel you Bob Harper . My 10-minute animation project could range from $200,000 (Anime) to $750,000 (Pixar-style) for broadcast quality based on the website. The original budget for the Oscar winning 5-minute (+) short Halr Love was $75,000. You're talking about $15,000/per minute. They wound-up raising close to $250,000 on Kickstarter. If any of you guys want to give me loan I'm all ears. LOL!

Christian Nommay

I agree with you, both. The part about the quality of production isn't very clear.

Mike Boas

Everything is negotiable. And then it depends on the cost of labor, of course. Shorts are hard to earn money with, so it doesn’t make much sense to sink too much money into them. Sometimes if there’s a cause, a non profit might put in money (see this past year’s Oscar winning short). But very often shorts are produced by students or individuals interested in showcasing their talent. So free labor makes them much cheaper.

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