Financing / Crowdfunding : Indiegogo by Jim Defalco

Jim Defalco

Indiegogo

Hey everyone, this past summer I shot a feature film with a budget of $6,000 over the course of 10 days. I am currently in post and I'm about to post an Indiegogo campaign to raise post-production funds / festival submissions etc. I have never ran a crowd sourcing campaign, is there anything I should be doing to make sure it's successful? I have had my cast and crew posting about the film on their social media profiles for the past 4 months or so. Between all of us we have a network of over 10k people that will see our initial posts. Does my campaign bode well for me that the film is done? I mean, some people ask for money and there is the possibility that the project never even gets made. Will the fact that filming is done assuage peoples fears of investing, since there is no real risk of the project not moving forward? Any help is appreciated!

Steven Harris Anzelowitz

I would contact John Trigonis at Indiegogo Film. He is their head film strategist. If anyone knows about crowdfunding a film it would be him.

Moon Mahmood

Jim, what's your film about? For example if its about transportation, I'd contact every transportation organization or groups out there. Try to branch out the the groups of what your films about and see If you can work something with them. Hope this helps! Best regards!

Jim Defalco

It's a romantic comedy that we shot all over Long Island, New York. It's called Long Island Love Story. We're looking into contacting the local news to try and get the word out on the film.

Moon Mahmood

Local press helps for sure! I'm sure you already know this but don't forget to put in a press release as well. :) Best of luck Jim!

Jim Defalco

You think a press release for an Indiegogo campaign would work? Should I target more the trade magazines or just newspapers / sites?

Moon Mahmood

I personally think It doesn't hurt to do both. I wouldn't write in the press release your looking for money, that's just my opinion. Talk about what kind of story your telling, what stage it's in etc. and at the end of the press release make sure to leave a link where people get more details about your story. Or you can put a link to your indiegogo campaign. That's just how I'd do it. Hope it helps.

Alfonsina Sterling

Maybe creating a trailer-teaser about the movie. Also, when launching your campaign, make sure to first reach family and friends. That way when you make it public you'll have some funds. It is different to click and sees a Project that no one has funded. If I stumble with an unknown project that already has financial support, I might see it with different eyes.

Jim Defalco

That's what we've been doing. I'm waiting to hear back from my local news station about running a story about the film. The Indiegogo campaign for our film Long Island Love Story went live on Monday, and as of an hour ago we have had 660 visitors and only 3 backers. That's through the friends of family of me and my cast & crew as well as from twitter and other social media posts. Is it possible people don't want to contribute since filming is finished, and they don't really understand what post production entails? (I made it known what we need the funds for in the pitch video / message)

Alfonsina Sterling

Well, maybe. Not everyone knows how making a film does. Maybe you could create one funny video explaining why you need that funding. Since its a comedy, you could use your actors and make a very short funny explanation of why the movie IS NOT DONE YET. And then use social media. Get in touch with bloggers, people who write about a similar topic and have their own followers. When we ask for money sometimes is not about what is it for, but how we ask for it. Maybe think of strategic words (like instead of saying help us, why not propose to be part of it? be a co-producer?) Make people feel that they are investing in something more than charity. And since you only have 3 backers, maybe you can use it to your advantage. Maybe, you can relaunch the project with a different strategy. Point to those 600 visitors. If they saw/clicked your project they got interested in it. Now the question is, why didn't they buy it? Is like when you get into a store, you take a look around but maybe didn't SEE what you wanted. And just before leaving someone comes, asks and helps you FIND that trendy jean that was in the back. Ok, I might get poetic on that part....but what I mean is, we all need help on deciding where our money will go. We just need some spark.

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