Screenwriting : Where can I find a manager? by Sam Coniglio

Sam Coniglio

Where can I find a manager?

Hello everyone. So, I have a television drama series pilot script and I am looking for a manager to help take it to the next level. Any advice on finding one? I would rather have a manager then an agent.

Sam Coniglio

Yeah but 99% of producers won’t read a script unless it’s from a known agent or manager.

Sam Coniglio

I have been sent a ton of emails from producers and companies stating they will not touch unsolicited scripts and only accept them from agents or managers.

Eric Christopherson

Not true, Sam, based on personal experience. But you've got to pay to play at sites such as this one.

Sam Coniglio

I don’t understand what you mean by pay to play but yes 90% of all of the people and companies I talked to only take scripts from agents or managers. I know this because I have personally spoken with them. I have only gotten positive responses by 3 companies that would accept my script to read without an agent or producer and I have contacted a TON of producers and companies.

John Day

Pay to play = pay to pitch. Try virtualpitchfest.com -- but research the producer you're pitching to so that your $$ isn't wasted.

Sam Coniglio

I heard those pitch fests online and pretty much all script writing contests are scams.

John Day

Well, I have a manager now -- and for me it all started with that site. You just have to be very strategic about who you're pitching to. No doubt there are scams out there... just not this particular site. And Stage 32 has success stories, as well (but is more expensive).

Sam Coniglio

It would be great to get ahold of a known actor but they’re contact information is so discreet it’s nearly impossible to contact them. And if you were lucky enough to actually find their contact information, it would take a miracle for them to even give you their time to read your script. I am lucky to have gotten a positive response from 3 companies, well, actually 2 companies and a television producer. But again, I did contact like 30 different people and places.

Ruben Diaz

99% of companies won't take unsolicited material due to the legal liability.

Sam Coniglio

I understand. All of this feedback is extremely helpful. I uploaded a logline, synopsis and script in the logline area. I would definitely like some feedback on that also, whether negative or positive.

Doug Nelson

I say this over & over & over... LISTEN UP! This industry is based (almost) entirely on interpersonal interaction - PERIOD. Get your butt out from hiding and make some personal connections.

Sam Coniglio

I am trying.

Dan MaxXx

Here's Jeff Lieber's advice about chasing Reps. He's not selling you script services or theories. He's showing you steps of the TV game.

https://twitter.com/JeffLieber/status/1188949296046952449?s=20

Sam Coniglio

Yeah. That's what the ones did that I gave my script to.

M L.

Have a lawyer look over those release forms. Circle of Confusion for example accepts queries but you basically sign over all rights to them and it's laughable cause they can pretty much develop an identical project to yours and you'd have no recourse whatsoever.

Dan MaxXx

False. CoC is a standard release form. You’re not giving up rights. Cmon

Craig D Griffiths

On the topic of theft of material. A script is 2% of the process (for argument sake). Would you risk 98% of your investment to save 2%. Because your film could be delayed for years in court.

I understand a writer’s fear. It is 100% of their effort. But it is only part of a huge process.

Sam Coniglio

I decided not to sell it as a television series. I instead decided to sell it as the first short in a series of 3 short films all linked together as sequels. I find this to be more original and artistic.

Sam Coniglio

Sorry. I meant a 4 part series. The first 3 will focus on the life of a particular main character and displays how they are all in connection with each other then the 4th and final of the series will be the grand finale.

Erik A. Jacobson

A manager's first question to you will be "What else do you have?" If you have nothing else, you might have trouble convincing him/her you're a serious writer.

Sam Coniglio

I’m working on part 2 of the limited series now. I’m also working on a full feature psychological horror script.

Craig D Griffiths

To add to what Erik said. You may be a serious writer. But they need a viable product. With one project and a draft of another, your not a viable product yet.

Dan MaxXx

Doesn’t seem like you try at all selling/submitting your tv spec. Seems like you gave up and now want to do a limited series of the same idea without any knowledge/study of either formats. And it’s not even finished if you’re writing part 2. Why write part 2 if nobody wants to read part 1?

Donnalyn Vojta

Hi, Sam. I agree with Craig, I learned almost a year ago that managers won't even consider a new literary client unless that writer has 3-4 solid marketable scripts, at least two of which have been optioned or sold. Good luck! And KEEP WRITING!!!

Sam Coniglio

Dan MaxXx I didn’t give up at all. I just feel this would be the best way to tell the story. I see and feel myself as being more of a feature film writer than a television series writer. I have always had a passion and dream of being a film writer.

William Martell

Know that the average professional screenwriter didn't make a dime until their 9th script. And that's when managers will be interested. Until then: read the trades and note sales similar to your projects - they usually include the manager's name in the stories. This gets you a list of managers who actually make deals and managers who like material similar to yours.

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