Screenwriting : Analysis From BlueCat by Aray Brown

Aray Brown

Analysis From BlueCat

Archive 6725 KILBOURNE Reader 8116 What did I like? For most of the script, the pace of the film was nice and quick, unburdened by long expositional dialogue. The script establishes characters and conflicts in the opening scenes, and the story commences at a nice, quick pace. This script is a wild ride. Each character has a distinct voice and seems like a unique individual, which is important in a film with so many characters. I could hear the different voices of all the characters while I was reading, which is always a good sign. I liked the change in my perspective on Edward the the script achieves. At first I thought he was essentially a demon - a boy like the boy in Lynne Ramsay’s film We Need to Talk About Kevin (which if you haven’t seen you should definitely watch). But in your pilot I felt myself slowly starting to sympathize with and understand Edward. I could go even deeper with Edward - which is good - because this is only the first chapter in a longer work. You have a definite control of the mood of the script and you have a lot of ideas about making this script/series a dark crazy ride, and think, with a little more work, you will have a distinctive, polished psychological horror pilot. What needed work? You should help us relate to your current characters more by giving them more dimension. There isn’t enough depth to many of your central characters, in particular I’d like to understand Zoe and Frank better. Zoe feels too much like she is in either Edward’s orbit or Derek’s orbit. She seems very weak. And for her to go from essentially not resisting her rape by the Professor to slitting the the professor’s throat with a glass shard was a very big shift. Similarly, I don’t understand Frank at all. If he is so monstrous, why does he go to the psychologist? Why does he kill Koaleen? Is Edward (through the fake suicide note) telling the truth about Frank, i.e. that Frank was having an affair? Perhaps these are questions you plan to answer in future episodes, but I’m still baffled by Frank’s behavior. Since Korean Boy introduces himself as Cho, and has so many lines, go ahead and put him as Cho in the character name line rather than Korean Boy. While a fast pace is typically good, I think a lot of these moments are so big and full of violence that you may need more pages for us to understand the characters actions. So much happens in these 37 pages! It’s enough plot for several episodes. I could imagine taking an entire episode to reach the moment on page 9 when Edward says, “Edward is dead.” Oroson Scott Card, in his book about characters, says that we consume fiction in order to understand a character better than we understand anyone else besides ourselves. I like your characters, but I consistently felt that - just when I was close to achieving some kind of new insight into them - the script would swerve into violence. You’ve made a great start, but I believe you can dig a little deeper into these characters and their lives to unearth something new and novel, something revelatory. As you are letting us see the world through these characters eyes, I would like to be more surprised by what I see.

Dan MaxXx

Nice job!

the review reads like a full page 1 rewrite.

37 pages is short for a drama horror pilot. "Not enough meat on the bone."

Keep cooking! The stove is on!

Jody Ellis

Very nice! Just got our notes back too. Bluecat does a good job, I do think their free feedback makes the entry fee worthwhile.

Aray Brown

I agree Jody :) Now to focus on the rewrite. It's nice to get some good, honest feedback once and awhile

Aray Brown

Thanks D! Appreciate ya :) And thanks for the demon child note the first time round.

Linda Hullinger

Aray! How exciting! That's great!

Aray Brown

Thanks Linda ;)

Doug Nelson

Aray - Well done. Those sorts of notes makes a Producer and/or Agents/Managers pay attention.

Aray Brown

Thanks Doug ;)

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Nice job my friend. Lots of violence sounds great to me and enough plot for several episodes... Is that a bad thing? If this is a pilot you don't want to bore people.

Aray Brown

Lol I don't want to bore ppl. Other ppl have bored me though

Natalie Farst

I have had 2 very positive experiences with Blue Cat. Definitely worth the time and money in my opinion.

Anthony Moore

Got my feedback today. It reads along similar lines. They loved the future world and the characters I created and everything flows naturally as if my cyber-punk world really existed but the characters did have enough depth. Interesting.

Jeff Lyons

Sorry, but I really think these contests (all of them) are useless when it comes to notes. The praise you can get from your mother, the criticism is so general as to be useless. Part of the mill these contests ultimately are. Readers get paid crap and they burn thru piles of bad scrips, and hate every minute of it. You're much better off getting a professional reader to do real coverage or better real development notes so you have something you can actually act on.

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Jeff: I believe you're partially correct about contest coverage. And, although I compete in many contests and film festivals, I never pay for feedback. Frankly, I don't give a flying f*#k what another reader's opinion is about my work. In many cases, they're just other screenwriters. But, In the case of Blue Cat, they charge nothing extra for free feedback; and with the exception of one person I know, the feedback I've seen, including mine, attempts to offer earnest assessments of the work. I've read exceptional feedback from contests like Page and Fresh Voices that I would stack up against any professional reader. And usually, for a pretty reasonable fee, contest entrants can get some feedback on their work from someone other than mom. So it's best to have fun and take it all with a grain to avoid getting a migraine.

Dan Guardino

Aray. Great job!

David E. Gates

I agree with Claude... I think that virtually all these competitions exist to create the organisers money. They offer big promises but from what I've seen rarely deliver.

Aray Brown

Very interesting, Anthony. I do think the Frank character could use more depth. Don't know about Zoe. I stated in the script that she's in a trance when the professor takes advantage of her. I could have her fight him off. But later on, you'll see that Zoe is a little crazy. I got similar feedback from the book it's inspired by. I might slow it down a bit but not all at once. I don't plan on slow dragging the first season of some the TV shows.

Vince Conside

Great Job!

Aray Brown

First of all, it's free feedback. I don't pay for feedback, unless there's good reason, like the coverage on the happy writers tab for instance. Second of all, I'd rather get feedback from BlueCat, the judges from reputable contests, than a Screenwriter who calls himself an award winning when he only has two from film festivals who critiques my script up and down because it doesn't fit into his box or a cynic. Thirdly, I know this is a dishonest world. Don't need any clarity on that. Last but not least, I'm just sharing good content.

Mike W. Rogers

For those who do not believe contest are worth it (or more to the point the feedback), what avenues do you pursue to expose your writing to people who matter?

I am trying everything and slowly eliminating the services I find not helpful.

So far Black list is the only one I have dropped (seems utterly useless) but I am always looking for fresh avenue to show my crappy work and to get better at my crappy work.

Aray Brown

Thank you Michael, my sentiments exactly

Anthony Moore

I submit my crappy work to contests, mostly to find out just how crappy it is. Once I have written enough to have graduated from crappy to not-so-crappy then I''ll work on getting a manager and an agent.

Dan Guardino

I don’t enter contest. However, if someone enters a legitimate contest that people in the business heard of and your script placed or won it is something you can put in your resume. That might help convince a producer or agent that they should read one of your screenplays. So even though I never entered them I think it would be considered at least a stepping stone to getting into the business.

In this business you never know what will work for you or when it will happen so really have to try everything.

Jody Ellis

Claude Gagne how many contests have you entered? I've entered quite a few and I've found Blue cat to be pretty good insofar as offering FREE feedback. I don't and won't pay extra for feedback, but when it's offered as part of the entry fee, it's worth it to me. The feedback we received from Bluecat was not a "fill in the blank" type of response. The reader referenced specific scenes that he/she liked and obviously read the script and gave it some time.

My guy also purchased some coverage (his choice, I didn't see the point) for our script and the feedback we received from it was no better or worse than Bluecat.

IMO, I think feedback can be valuable if you have readers consistently pointing out weak spots in your script, it's good to know where changes need to be made. I always take it with a grain of salt, because even Contest readers or paid coverage are, at the end of the day, just people with opinions and likes/dislikes.

Contests can be a great way to get ones work noticed. You have to place pretty high in order to get more than just recognition, but there have been scripts that were optioned or went into production after contest wins, as well as writers getting representation.

And Claude, all screenwriters are in competition with each other, all the time. That's how the industry works.

Dan Guardino

Anthony. If you want an agent shoot for a little higher than "not so-crappy." I set my bar at "no worse than the rest of the crap Hollywood produces." That is a step and a half better than "not so crappy" but it is still pretty crappy.

Dan MaxXx

Mickey Fisher was discovered on Tracking Board. Stage 32 Member Max Adams won Nicholls, she's done alright with 20+ years as a professional Screenwriter.

Lots of bitter Writers on forums.

Doug Nelson

Claude - ' looks to me like you're having a bad hair day. Certainly not all contests are the same nor all readers. It's up to you to research which ones suit your tastes and expectations. I've been (at various times) a paid reader for industry bound scripts. I've also been a film judge and a script reader for a number of contests over the years. I've always tried to offer my best - I go out of my way to help local film talent whenever I can. I've not seen any of your work so I can't comment. I don't take any of your comments personally but I do find them discouraging.

Aray - Blue Cat is one of the better contests - so nice job.

Vince Conside

The bitter should stay quiet and most of the time they have nothing to offer. Aray Brown Blue Cat has an excellent reputation ... as I said before; Great Job!

Aray Brown

So I've heard ;) I only get with the best. Blue Cat, Big Break, Wildsound ( seems to be a good one), Script Pipeline . Also submitted to the film empire's Rising Writers Initiative tv writing contest (saw it on my IG timeline so I figured what the h**ll)

Danny Manus

Jesus, Claude, you might be the most cynical person on here and thats saying something... Show me on the doll where the contest touched you. Of course contests are pitting you against other writers. What do you think Producers and Agents do when they read your script?? Its not just about if your script is GOOD, it's about if it is better than all the others. thousands of others. Truth is, Contests are great and free feedback is fine, but i tend to agree with Jeff Lyons. MOST first & second round readers and the ones paid for doing notes are just writers who made the semis the year before or are interns, assistants, and writer friends of the contest. But by the time you reach the semis, most judges are pros. Ive judged the semis of PAGE for years (for free, i dont get paid).

Brad Johnson

was nice to get some feedback from the reader but I never heard anything about the actual contest. Guess I didn't win!

Aray Brown

@Danny lol

Aray Brown

@Brad the contest is still going on

Ed Fletcher

I wouldn't pay for feedback from every contest but Blue Cat seems to be one of the better ones. I don't believe in contests either, expect the ones I win.

Jeff Lyons

I know a lot of people here are down on getting notes and I understand. There's a lot of snake oil out there and it's hard to find real help. But for those who just dismiss readers out of hand, think about the fact that the studios all use readers, there is a readers union!, all major prodcos use readers, and creative executives would not be able to do their jobs if it wasn't for the fact that their companies had a script department reading and doing their coverage. Readers are the workhorses of the development world and they don't just do a couple of pages of notes (2pg synopsis, 1/2 page notes)... they do many different kinds of coverages depending on the needs of the company. They're not one-trick ponies. It's worth finding a few studio-level readers and befriend them and use them as beta readers. Pay them more than they get from their producers and they will love you... and they are usually worth it. Reading and giving notes is a talent and you don't have to be a frustrated screenwriter to be a good reader. Frankly, the best readers are wannabe creative producers—not screenwriters— working their way up the ladder. I love readers and development people, they are very important members of the story biosphere, so don't let your cynicism blind you to a valuable resource. Yes... you'll kiss lots of frogs... but you will find your prince.

Richard Gustason

I'm seeing where BlueCat does better with notes than any of the others. Haven't done anything in a while with them but after you shared this, I just may get back to them more often.

Dan MaxXx

Claude

Name the writing contests. Name them so others can decide on their own free will. Everybody here is an adult. Name the contests you didn't get your money's worth.

Owen Mowatt

Agree with Dan, name names.

Also, there could be a number of reasons why you didn't receive a reply.

Doug Nelson

Claude - Please do us all a favor; name what you think are "bad contests" so that we can be a little better educated and be made aware. My experience is to recommend those that I've had excellent experiences: Page, Blue Cat, Sundance table read, The MIX, Moondance. CWA and a couple of others. I write shorts mostly, so I can't speak to those that only take FL scripts.

Owen - agree that there may be reasons for not receiving a reply. As the dead line draws near, there is often an up-tic in the number of entries and if your script is junk, no one has the time to wade through the crap - so it just goes in the trash so the entrant forfeits his fee. With any luck they'll think the contest is a scam and they won't bother entering in the future.

Myron DeBose

Dan and Doug, your comments make me laugh this 4th. I'll be honest, the industry professional that I loosely know went to Harvard or Yale or UCLA or have their MFA. I did not go to film school and I don't have a masters. This game is heavy and it intimidates the hell out of me. Just like my heroes, I wlll face the challenge because I respect that Literary major from Dartmouth reading my screenplay. Sure, you don't know her now but she is a Future Studio head. I respect that intern from Chicago Film School. I respect these future industry stars without names. I trust the process. Because, they are just like us. He is the potential Director of the next blockbuster... your screenplay. Congratulations, to all the contest winners, finalists and honorable mentions. You make us proud.

Doug Nelson

Well then Claude - just tell us the ones you've entered and specifically tell us about the good ones you've entered.

Martina Cook

Can we all not just be happy for the great feedback? Congratulations Aray, stay strong through the rewrite and keep us in the loop for future developments! :)

Pierre Langenegger

Scriptapalooza and Final Draft Big Break are both reputable, I know nothing about Shore Scripts. What are the other ones you entered, Claude?

Aray Brown

I know nothing of Shore Script either

Dan MaxXx

Nobody's gonna get sued for defamation. I don't believe you because you have 0 credibility and 0 entertainment experience . You lost me at hello; when folks start comparing Governments to writing contests, it's time to check out and find another hobby.

Dan MaxXx

what do loglines and self-published books have to do with your belief contests ripped you off?

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Folks that grouse about contests tend to be the ones that don't do well with them. Conversely, I don't think writers should take contests and film festivals too seriously. Lots of Indie movies make the rounds at smaller film festivals and get all kinds of accolades and still, nobody sees them. Even writers that have won Page and Nicholl have gotten the water cooler tour in Hollywood and then do nothing. Contests should be used to help a person hone their skills and have fun doing that. I have placed at more than 50 festivals and contests including Page, Shore Scripts, Austin Film Festival, Sunscreen Film Festival, Screencraft and Harlem International Film Festival. And I have not placed at many contests. I spend no more time thinking about that then I do deliberating about what I'm going to have for breakfast. I believe my time is much better spent trying to write great material and then trying to sell it to someone.

Addendum: And, listen to folks like Dan MaxXx, Doug Nelson, Jody Ellis and Dan G, who would advise you to use your spec scripts like calling cards to solicit writing work.

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

People really shouldn't plug their Amazon books here in this forum Tales From HP Lovecraft by Phillip Hardy, available on Kindle and paperback. It really offends me.

Bill Costantini

Right or wrong.....delusional or realist.....amateur or sold writer.....the fierce passions of the writers know no bounds. Give me 20 Dan MaxXx's, Claude Gagne's, and Aray Brown's....and I could take over THE WORLD - and quickly, and with a lot of sweet and well-planned pain! Even today....when the scents of last night's fireworks linger in the morning air....I can smell the rage and fury of the argomento degli scrittores from 3,000 miles away!

God bless America....God bless the Writer....and go fuuuuuuuuudge yourself, Philllllll-ip E. Harrrrrrr-dy!

Aray Brown

Yeah Phil, I detest it too * Blood Is Thicker Than Water * by Aray Brown, paperback only so I can get paid even if you hate it lol

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Give me three Bill C's and I can operate any Burger King in the Continental USA. One for the counter, one to work the meat and one to pick the buns off the floor. Drink hot french fry grease you slippery devil!

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Aray: Good one!

Bill Costantini

Phillip: Give me 800 G's and we can open up that Burger King by December!

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Bill C:

Give me 800 grand and you and I can run away to a small island in the Caribbean, open a jerk chicken stand and start our own screenwriting fellowship.

Bill Costantini

Phillip: Sorry I can't respond with my usual wit.....I've been reading the news story about the Rob Kardishian/Blac Chyna public/Internet rift, and am just too devastated to compose something that meets my profound and insightful standards.

Doug Nelson

Aray - after all this teeth gnashing, fist clenching and cheap shots from the peanut gallery; Aray, ya done good.

Aray Brown

Thank again Doug ;) Claude is not the only cynical writer. I predict there a lot in Hollywood. Why do I want to move to LA again? If I can make it there, I'll make it anywhere

Richard Gustason

Love that attitude about Hollywood Aray Brown. I think you can go farther with that positive attitude then the cynics. Just my opinion though.

Jorge J Prieto

Aray: good work. I like BlueCat, also The Page. If two readers give the same feedback, that's a sign for change. Now, Peter Russell (I think?) once said, " in features the protagonist bleeds quickly, but in a TV series, it bleeds slowly, sometimes for years if the series is a hit." So the notes are right on, when they told you, "So much happens in 37 minutes, that that's enough for an entire season..." I believe that's what the reader said. You can do what they do know on T.V. shows, not every episode is all about one character week after week. Give each character their storyline or backstory, IF you already have a Bible which is not recommended, since showrunners will be hired to write continuing episodes once the show is picked up for a full season. Congratulations this far, amiga and good luck moving forward. A really lengthy debate, so that's enough to make you happy, I hope?

Aray Brown

I'm not naive, Claude. I'm a total skeptic but I also do my research on what contests to enter before I spend my money. And it is an investment, if you do it right, registering for pitch sessions, entering contests, Happy Writers coverage is ALL an investment. It's about putting yourself out there and getting your material noticed. I don't know about you, but this is more than a hobby for me. I love what I do and I'm very passionate about my art. And yes, I call it art cuz I'm an artist. This is not a fun thing for me to just try. This is the only thing I'm good at. This is what God called me to do and you don't have to understand or agree with me. I really don't care what you have to say or what your opinion is. This thread is clearly not for you. You're not the first person to educate me, you're the first to claim they know what they're talking about when they have no freaking clue. Maybe you should keep scrolling.

Jody Ellis

Claude Gagne so what is your end goal? Contests are a scam, agents are on the take, everyone is naive, why are you even doing this if you find all of it so distasteful? Why make yourself miserable? It's one thing to be a realist, and normal to be a bit cynical once one is exposed to how the Hollywood thing really works, but I'm seeing nothing but negativity from you. There are many other creative outlets for writers, if you hate everything associated with screenwriting, find something else that better suits you. Life is too short!

Pierre Langenegger

Claude, are you including Scriptapalooza and Final Draft Big Break in your list of bad/ripoff competitions?

Doug Nelson

Claude - Here in OR we have a bottle bill - I get $.10 back for every beer/soft drink/water bottle I recycle (and I like good beer.) I save 'em up until I get a leaf bag full, then I turn 'em in and buy some lottery tickets. So far, I've won $100K - not bad for drinkin' beer, eh? I can't do anything to increase my lottery odds but I can increase my odds of creating a marketable script; or I could just call the whole thing off and waste my time bitchin' about it.

I am a true skeptic - I don't believe anything I hear and about half of what I see; but I'm gonna keep on truckin' anyway.

Danny Manus

Jody has a great point...Claude, if everyone is against you and everything is a scam...whatcha doin? what are you doing on here but more importantly...how are you getting read and advancing your career? self published books arent gonna do it unless youve sold 50K copies. So what is YOUR preferred method of breaking thru?

Babz Bitela, President

you know what is so amazing: writers like that have no idea the REALITY of what the business is that they are trying to break into. stunning.

Pierre Langenegger

So God is going to show you how to write a kick-ass screenplay?

Aray Brown

That's ridiculous. God helps those who help themselves. You have to study and hone your craft, and learn the business. It's amazing how someone in the same boat as me tries to educate me on breaking in. Have you had one of your scripts optioned? What kind of credibility do you have that would cause me to take you seriously?

Danny Manus

Claude, i know Hollywood has a reputation of being full of Godless heathens who only care about money, sex ans fame...And thats true. But theres a big diff between faith and delusion. Between confidence and ego. Between craft and craft service.

Bill Costantini

The world's greatest director dies and goes to Heaven. St. Peter meets him at the gate. "I'm so happy you're here, God wants you to direct a movie. We have the script written by William Shakespeare, DaVinci is the production designer, Michaelangelo is doing the sets, and Laurence Olivier is the lead actor."

"Wow...I'm so honored," said the director. "Who do we have for the lead actress?"

St. Peter shook his head. "Well, you see, God's got this girlfriend, and...."

Bill Costantini

Claude: I've paid for pitching sessions that got me options; a writing contract; many writing/editing gigs; an investment in a business; and other rewarding opportunities. I've never won a contest, though.

For outsiders, the easiest route to success is to pay to pitch; pay to enter a contest; and pay consultants to get your scripts in better shape. You may not like those beliefs, but it's at least been my reality, and probably the reality of many others, too

Jody Ellis

Claude Gagne Ive had several "general" meetings with managers and producers, as well as now having several on my roster who read any new script I write. I've had dinner and drinks with agents. I've met tons of other screenwriters, one who has become a dear friend and who is currently working on a script with Coppola. Not all connections from contest placement, some have come about by using paid pitch sites like VP and Inktip. I'm also attending a major film festival this fall, a direct result of contest placement, which I'm hoping might put me in direct contact with more industry bigwigs.

In the meantime I'm always writing, always talking to people, reading, learning and looking for different ways in.

While nothing has quite "stuck" yet in regards to getting a movie made, that's not my end goal. I'd love to see one of my scripts become a movie but realistically, I've a better chance at getting an open writing job from a producer. That's what spec scripts really do and that's why everyone says they are a calling card to producers and other execs.

What I don't do is spend my time bemoaning the unfairness of it or say it's all a scam. Instead, I've immersed my little grifter heart into the belly of the beast and I'm managing to tread water.

Doug Nelson

Claude = You've hijacked Aray's post for your own personal rant - shame on you. It's evident to me that screenwriting is not your strong suit - maybe you ought to try somethin' else. My answer to your most recent questions is yes & yes. Now I'm through with your nonsense; I'm gonna find that little chevron up there and unsubscribe from this thread,

Aray -I'm sorry that some pizzlewit is trying to pop your bubble but we all know you done good.

Owen Mowatt

"You thread-jacking pizzlewit"

Hahaah!

Jody Ellis

Yes, Aray, sorry it all went sideways but you have everything to be proud of with your feedback!

Clare Keogh

"You thread-jacking pizzlewit' Brilliant, Well done, Aray!

Babz Bitela, President

I'm curious, Aray: have you hosted a table read of your script? I find this is very helpful before I take a script out to the market, I ask the writer (if unproduced) to host one. The writer sits and listens: DOES NOTHING but take notes and pay attention. No drinking (I know but trust me it's better sober) and what I have been told and what I have personally witnessed during the reads? PRICELESS. Jokes that suck, go. Drama that is melodramatic and silly? Dump that clunker. Wordy stuff that slows down the pace in the room: nix it. In short, if any unproduced writer gives this a go, it's a wonderful, often fun, but very educational way to hear and almost 'see' your film in motion. After the read, then bust out the wine and pizza. You will probably have cause to celebrate. PS don't need actors, just get a bunch of friends and assign them several roles on an index card. TELL THEM on the card not in the room their 'motivation' or character's little secrets if you want but it's for their eyes only. I tell ya, I've done this and its payoff? Priceless. Respectfully, BABZ

Bill Costantini

Jody: if I recall correctly, RB is giving $10,032 and a dozen cannolis from Cavaretta's to each person whose forum topics receive over 100 replies in July. Only 12 to go, Aray! Heh-heh.

Phillip "Le Raconteur" Hardy

Claude, me lad:

I'd spend less time worrying about what other folks are doing and more time doing things to further your writing career. Personally, my contest activities, including frequent placements and occasional wins have not hurt my resume. I've connected with multiple producers, directors, two literary agents and was interviewed by Screencraft magazine, after three of my earlier scripts placed in their action screenplay contest. I've also had four scripts optioned using Inktip. You may verify that statement with the links below. You may ask Array and several other writers here at S32 that I will always make time to help my fellow writers. So instead of diminishing the success of others, even small things like good script feedback or contest placement, you may consider dialing back your disdain.. And, let me assure you, my fellow writers have helped me with connections feedback and emotional support.

https://www.inktip.com/main_total_deals_closed.php?sel=14

https://www.inktip.com/sa_highlights416.pdf

https://www.inktip.com/main_total_deals_closed.php?sel=15

https://staging.inktip.com/main_total_deals_closed.php?sel=13

Aray Brown

It's all about the Benjamins, Bill lol

Aray Brown

Babz, I have not but I definitely want to do one

Aray Brown

I might get actors instead of family though

Aray Brown

Jody, I'm not letting Claude's comments get to me. Someone's gotta play grumpy

Danny Manus

let me say as the only person in this thread who has been on the OTHER side, I always read major contest winners when i was an exec. I took plenty of meetings with contest winners, i optioned 2 scripts at Pitchfests (yes, thats out of 2500 pitches), optioned 2 scripts off VPF. And now, when i try to set my clients up with meetings, saying they've won a major contest DOES help...

Doug Nelson

Claude - so the dog picked up his own poop? A well mannered dog indeed. I'm a writer - I get to make up m own words - maybe ole Dan Webster 'ill put it in his book.

Danny, thanx for the verification; I've never been on that side of the fence but from my side - I've seen it done (happened to me).

Aray Brown

Babz, I'm also working on a short that I'm planning to produce. A table read is on my to-do list. Thanks for the advice ;)

Aray Brown

Jorge, you've given me an idea

Sylvia Marie Llewellyn

Thanks Aray for sharing your feedback and belated Congrats, sweetie. I'm late to this party... but enjoyed reading all the comments and advice very much. I've never entered Blue Cat ever. Might give them a try.

Aray Brown

Thanks Sylvia!

Aray Brown

I'm a just get these rewrites, even though I detest some of them

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