Screenwriting : Query Letters by Elle Craib

Elle Craib

Query Letters

Hey everyone, I was just wondering if anyone had any great advice or links for writing a Query Letter. They are not my strongest point and I fail miserably at them. Thanks In Advanced.

Michael L. Burris

Ashley Scott Meyers- sellingyourscreenplay.com or something like that. Nice class, haven't chatted with him in a while but seems like an all around pretty genuine guy wanting to help people. Take the free class.

Elle Craib

Thanks I will check out that site soon :)

William Martell

I second Scott, a great guy. Keep the query letter simple. Title & logline. Brief bio paragraph on why you are the expert when it comes to this script (you may have a degree in screenwriting, but if your script is about a farm kid then being in 4H when you were in middle school might be more important). It really all comes down to that logline, and specifically the concept of your screenplay. At the query stage it's all about having an unique and exciting idea.

Elle Craib

Hey thanks :) I found all of your responses very helpful.

William Martell

Unless they ask for a synopsis, skip it.

Andrew M. A. Spear

remember it's not about you but what you can do for them. know who you are approaching and what they are interested in producing. give them a great title and concept and attached a 2-4 page treatment (attached) which you can suggest they can read if they are interested.

Michael L. Burris

Alle you bring up a really good point of not knowing what a story is about. I myself am realizing I'm not pitching to lay people and better damn well know what my story is about and from a high concept perspective. If we can't learn concept and high concept we might as well forget the effort. Knowing our stories from a high concept perspective better get to the point of feeling natural too I believe. Some writers are just not ready and in the learning process of the basics but concept and high concept is the basics when it comes to having a legitimate shot at "pitching" anything. Thanks for bringing this matter up, it is a "highlight" of what many new writers including myself need to learn and better know. Hopefully other writers who are wanting to "pitch" research this. Feeling and being a fool can be part of the business but knowing the "high concept" can eliminate a lot of this fool type feeling. One of the best points I've seen someone on here make in a long time. The sad or naive thing about your statement is that many won't even know what you truly meant by that. Very nice post Alle and I truly hope it makes those wanting to "pitch" or inquire really think.

Richard "RB" Botto

I will 3rd Ashley. Ton of great info on his site. And one hell of a nice guy.

Ronni

Andrew, you have to be careful when you send an attachment in email. Most of the time they won't read it at all or it'll go directly into junk mail, if they don't know you (i'm guessing that's what you meant when you suggested to attach a treatment).

Andrew M. A. Spear

All depends how well you sell your movie and concept. From subject line to email to an attachment. Each is a different interest hurdle you must pass. But if they see something that intrigues them and they can make money on, they will move from level to level and will open an attached treatment. Not saying that everyone will or everyone will even consider your email, but the bottom line is that producers need scripts. It is there pipeline for revenue. Screenwriters must be (probably most important) sales people.

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