Actors: How To Know if a Rep Is Right For You

Hosted by Elizabeth Guest

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Elizabeth Guest

Webinar hosted by: Elizabeth Guest

Actor (Netflix, NBC, Showtime)

Elizabeth Guest is an actor, writer, director and producer based in Los Angeles. She attended USC's school of Cinematic Arts and has spent the past few years writing and performing her own material. She has put up numerous plays at the Upright Citizens Brigade theater one of which was called NICE GIRLS which was eventually turned into a digital series by Funny or Die. She also wrote/directed/produced and starred in the digital series GUEST APPEARANCES that won the Best Scripted Digital Series Jury Award at Austin Film Festival and the Best Short Form Jury Award at the Nashville Film Festival. She was named by Moviemaker Magazine as one of the "25 Screenwriters to Watch in 2017." Season one and season two of GUEST APPEARANCES will soon be streaming on FICTO. Other credits include THE MENTALIST, REAL ROB, and SUPERSTORE. She has two feature films that are currently in post production and you can catch her in the third season of the NBC show "A.P. Bio" out this summer. Elizabeth is a big believer in creating her own opportunities and would love to inspire actors in the Stage 32 community to do the same. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

All actors want representation. It’s often the first step actors take in their careers. After all, agents and managers are the ones that are connected to the industry. They know who is casting and where the auditions are, and they’re positioned to help you succeed—at least in theory. Many reps are incredible allies and partners for actors and transform careers for the better, but not all are created equal. Some reps unfortunately don’t carry their weight and fail to champion a client—sometimes they’re not as connected and in-the-know as they suggest, sometimes they might not be as invested in you as they should be. It can be common for actors in this position to blame themselves for lack of opportunities, even if the fault lies out of their control. But having a bad rep doesn’t mean you’re untalented and it doesn’t mean you can’t make it in the industry; it just means it’s time to recognize where the problem lies and to take back your own power. And, if you've decided to go without a rep, it's important to know that you have the power to move the needle on your career.

Many actors will sign with an agent or manager immediately because they feel it is better to be represented than have no rep at all. However, it’s important to make sure you and your rep have the same goals for your career and that you both will do what needs to be done to get those goals accomplished. If that’s not in the cards, it’s time to make a change. Every actor should first and foremost consider themselves their own representative—managers and agents will inevitably come and go throughout your career, but you will always need to be your best advocate. It’s therefore critical to understand, as your own representative, when the people in your corner are really in your corner, and when perhaps there is more you can do as an actor to find more success. When making these difficult decisions, remember that an actor’s world doesn’t start and stop with their rep; there is so much you can do before signing, after, and in between. It’s time to understand how to take control of your own career and hold both yourself and your representative accountable (if you have one).

Elizabeth Guest is an actor, writer, director and producer based in Los Angeles and has appeared on Netflix's REAL ROB, the Emmy-winning CALIFORNICATION, NBC'S A.P. BIO, CBS's THE MENTALIST and more. She attended USC's School of Cinematic Arts and has spent the past few years writing and performing her own material. She has put up numerous plays at the Upright Citizens Brigade theater, one of which, called NICE GIRLS, was eventually turned into a digital series by Funny or Die. She also wrote/directed/produced and starred in the digital series GUEST APPEARANCES which won the Best Scripted Digital Series Jury Award at Austin Film Festival and the Best Short Form Jury Award at the Nashville Film Festival. She was named by Moviemaker Magazine as one of the "25 Screenwriters to Watch." Season one and season two of GUEST APPEARANCES will soon be streaming on FICTO. She has two feature films that are currently in post production. Elizabeth is a big believer in creating her own opportunities and is ready to inspire actors in the Stage 32 community to do the same.

Elizabeth will draw from her own experience to teach you how to find your own power as an actor and how to know when to leave a rep that isn’t doing their job. She’ll begin by going over the roles and expectations of both managers and agents, what the differences are between the two, what an ideal agent and manager look like, and what a beneficial relationship between a rep and an actor should feel like. She’ll also discuss the separation of responsibilities that are standard between reps and actors. She’ll then talk about what to how to know when your rep isn’t doing their job. She’ll give you 6 red flags to keep a lookout for with your rep to determine if they might not be holding their end of the bargain. She’ll also share five things you should be asking yourself as a self check-in to make sure you’re doing all you can before blaming your rep. Elizabeth will teach you strategies you should try with your rep to repair the relationship and will give you tips on when to know it’s finally time to leave. Next, she will discuss the proper way to end your relationship with a manager and how to understand the legal aspects to avoid complications. Elizabeth will give you the tools and wherewithal to move forward with your career after leaving your manager or agent, including creating your own opportunities and finding ways to get yourself discovered without outside help. Finally, Elizabeth will explain what it means to take back your own power, how to craft the career you want and focus on the work to achieve your goals independently. It’s so important for actors in this industry to feel empowered and know their worth, and Elizabeth will give you the tools to do just that.

 

 

Praise for Elizabeth's Stage 32 Webinar

 

"Liz was informative and inspirational! Great ideas about content creation!"

-Bill H.

 

"Elizabeth is terrific, and inspiring. Plus she is experienced and knowledgeable"

-Dede R.

What You'll Learn

  • Managers vs. Agents for Actors
    • What’s the difference between an agent and a manager?
    • What does an ideal agent look like?
    • What does an ideal manager look like?
    • What does an ideal relationship between an actor and a rep look like?
    • The separation of responsibilities
  • If You Have a Rep: How Do You Know if Your Rep Is Right For You? 
    • 6 red flags to keep a lookout for with reps
    • Is it them or is it you?
    • Your own self check-in
    • 5 things you should make sure you’re doing before blaming your rep
    • Strategies you can try before leaving
    • How to know when it’s time to leave
  • How to Break Up with Your Rep
    • The proper way to end your relationship with an agent or manager
    • Legal aspects to keep in mind
  • If you DON'T Have a Rep: How to Move Your Career Forward
    • Creating your own opportunities
    • You really can get yourself discovered
    • How one thing can lead to the next
  • How to Take Back Your Power
    • Crafting your own career
    • Focusing on the work
    • Doing research on the business
    • Enjoying the process
  • Q&A with Elizabeth

About Your Instructor

Elizabeth Guest is an actor, writer, director and producer based in Los Angeles. She attended USC's school of Cinematic Arts and has spent the past few years writing and performing her own material. She has put up numerous plays at the Upright Citizens Brigade theater one of which was called NICE GIRLS which was eventually turned into a digital series by Funny or Die. She also wrote/directed/produced and starred in the digital series GUEST APPEARANCES that won the Best Scripted Digital Series Jury Award at Austin Film Festival and the Best Short Form Jury Award at the Nashville Film Festival. She was named by Moviemaker Magazine as one of the "25 Screenwriters to Watch in 2017." Season one and season two of GUEST APPEARANCES will soon be streaming on FICTO. Other credits include THE MENTALIST, REAL ROB, and SUPERSTORE. She has two feature films that are currently in post production and you can catch her in the third season of the NBC show "A.P. Bio" out this summer. Elizabeth is a big believer in creating her own opportunities and would love to inspire actors in the Stage 32 community to do the same.

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