Find and Work With the Right Screenwriting Manager For Your Career

Hosted by Krista Sipp

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Krista Sipp

Webinar hosted by: Krista Sipp

Literary Manager/Producer at First Friday Entertainment

Krista is a manager and producer at First Friday Entertainment, a literary management and production company founded by Krista and Devon Byers and dedicated to showcasing fresh and unique voices. Their client, Victoria Rose, was recently featured in the 2018 YOUNG & HUNGRY list. Their client’s credits include ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK, SENSE8, IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA, TRANSPARENT, PRECIOUS, HOUSE OF PAYNE, and many more titles. Prior to founding First Friday Entertainment Krista was with Circle of Confusion, New Wave Entertainment and Authentic Talent & Literary Management. Krista has built her career around finding and elevating unrecognized voices and will share what she has learned from her side of the table. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

So you’ve been writing and practicing your craft for a while. Maybe you’ve placed in some notable writing contests or have gotten great feedback from your peers, or maybe even some producers or executives. You’re ready to take the next big step in your writing career, but you’re not quite sure how to break in. You don’t have the right relationships to get your material in front of those who can bring it to fruition, or maybe you need some guidance as to what will get you noticed by network and studio executives who are staffing the shows you love. What you need is representation in the entertainment industry, specifically a manager who can help open those doors for you. But how do you go about finding and securing the right manager for your team?

The barrier to entry in the entertainment industry has never been higher. Legal policies often prohibit network and studio executives from reading material or listening to pitches from unrepresented writers. And managers are inundated with material from potential clients, queries getting lost in endless stacks of scripts, and that’s if they even accept queries at all! It’s a situation that often puts emerging writers in a tailspin - how do you gain entry to your dream industry when that first step feels impossible? The answer lies in being strategic in how you mobilize your network (which is probably bigger than you think it is); focusing on finding the right fit for your career, rather than taking a scattershot, any manager will do approach; and most importantly, keeping the train running regardless of if you have a manager or not - if you build it, they will come!

Krista is a manager and producer at First Friday Entertainment, a literary management and production company founded by Krista and Devon Byers and dedicated to showcasing fresh and unique voices. Their client, Victoria Rose, was recently featured in the 2018 YOUNG & HUNGRY list. Their client’s credits include ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK, SENSE8, IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA, TRANSPARENT, PRECIOUS, HOUSE OF PAYNE, and many more titles. Prior to founding First Friday Entertainment Krista was with Circle of Confusion, New Wave Entertainment and Authentic Talent & Literary Management. Krista has built her career around finding and elevating unrecognized voices and will share what she has learned from her side of the table.

Krista will walk through how literary managers operate and what you should be doing to ensure you can get the representation you need to get your writing career to the next level. She will begin by giving a rundown of what exactly lit managers do and how they differ from agents and attorneys. She’ll explain why managers are often the first type of representation for emerging writers and how you should know if you’re ready for a manager of your own. Then she will explain what managers generally look for in potential clients, including the type of material they’re searching for, the relationships they’re hoping for what a strong vision looks like. Next Krista will explain how managers go about finding new clients. She will teach you how to find and approach a potential manager for representation. To do this she will go through the tools that are available to you in finding a manger and how you should research potential managers and what kind of information you should look for to make sure they’re the right fit for you. She’ll then give you tips on how to mobilize your own personal network to attract a manager and then will lay out how to best write a query, including what you should also include and what you should never include. Krista will then talk about what you should do if a manager asks to read your material. She’ll explain when and how to best follow up, how to handle rejection if the manager decides to pass, how to handle requests for more material, and how to prepare for a signing meeting, or perhaps multiple meetings. Finally Krista will delve into the process of deciding to work with a lit manager. She will outline what to look for in a signing meeting, how to follow up after a meeting, and what to expect after agreeing to work together. She’ll talk about how to best manage the manager/client relationship and what to do if that relationship isn’t ultimately working. Finding and working with a lit manager can be challenging, but also incredibly important. Krista will give you the tools to navigate the process better and hopefully put the right actions into place to find a great manager for your career.

 

 

"Having a manager can be a critical step for a writer to find access in the entertainment industry and move forward in their career, but there's a lot that goes into finding the right fit and making the relationship work. I've seen my fair share of writers blow their chances at representation or come to the table ill equipped, and I'm so excited to be leading this webinar with Stage 32 to give writers the tools to better navigate this topic."

-Krista Sipp

What You'll Learn

  • What Is a Manager and What Do They Do?
    • What do managers do?
    • Managers vs Agents vs Attorneys
    • Why are managers often the first piece of representation for emerging writers?
    • How do you know you’re ready for a manager?
  • What Are Managers Looking For in a Potential Client
    • The right material.
    • The right relationships.
    • A strong vision.
  • How Do Managers Find New Clients?
  • How to Find and Approach a Manager for Representation
    • What tools are available to you in finding a manager?
    • How to research individual managers, and what kind of information to look for?
    • How to mobilize your network.
    • How to write a query - Do’s and Don’t’s
  • A Manager Has Asked To Read Your Material - What Now?
    • When and how to follow up?
    • How to handle rejection.
    • How to handle requests for more material.
    • How to prepare for a signing meeting - or multiple meetings!
  • Deciding to Work Together
    • What to look for in a signing meeting.
    • How to follow up after a meeting.
    • What to expect after agreeing to work together.
    • Managing the manager/client relationship.
    • What to do if the relationship isn’t working
  • Q&A with Krista

About Your Instructor

Krista is a manager and producer at First Friday Entertainment, a literary management and production company founded by Krista and Devon Byers and dedicated to showcasing fresh and unique voices. Their client, Victoria Rose, was recently featured in the 2018 YOUNG & HUNGRY list. Their client’s credits include ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK, SENSE8, IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN PHILADELPHIA, TRANSPARENT, PRECIOUS, HOUSE OF PAYNE, and many more titles. Prior to founding First Friday Entertainment Krista was with Circle of Confusion, New Wave Entertainment and Authentic Talent & Literary Management. Krista has built her career around finding and elevating unrecognized voices and will share what she has learned from her side of the table.

Testimonials

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