How To Capitalize Shooting On Digital

Hosted by Stephen Balsley

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Stephen Balsley

Webinar hosted by: Stephen Balsley

Digital Cinema Technology Support Specialist at MAXX Digital (RED, Arri, Canon, Nikon, Blackmagic & more)

Stephen Balsley began his career at a RED Digital Cinema nearly 9 years ago, and has watched it grow from a small startup company into one of the leading Cinema brands in the world. During that time, the RED One camera was largely credited with driving the shift from Film to Digital, with RED cameras now being used in a large number of films and other projects across the Industry. Although Stephen’s expertise is in RED, he is well experienced in all types of cameras, including Arri, Canon, Nikon, Blackmagic, and more. In his role as a camera and lens technician, he has had experience working with everyone from the largest production companies to the first-time independent filmmaker. He specializes in system integration, integrating digital cinema cameras into 3D systems, VR, Underwater and Shotover rigs, drones, large array based systems, and live 4K. As a camera operator, he has filmed 2 Rose Bowls, a BCS Championship game, and a UFC Championship, along with a diverse portfolio of other side projects. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Now that the barrier to entry is lower than ever to start creating your own content, it's imperative to learn how to capitalize shooting on digital. Whether it's understanding the needs of digital services like Netflix, or platforms like YouTube, there is a spot in the market for you to make it a career.
 
In this exclusive Stage 32 webinar your host Stephen Balsley will be going over the technology side of the Industry, with a specific focus on the shift from Film to Digital. We will also be learning to look at Media as a whole, from how each piece is interconnected, to how technology is affecting extraordinary change in every area of Media. 
 
We will go over specific examples of Filmmakers who have successfully capitalized on the shift to Digital, and will provide useful steps to ensure your projects are taking full advantage of the available Technology to give you the best possible chance at creative success.
 
The Technical side can be one of the most difficult and daunting areas of any Industry (like opening up the hood of a car), but Stephen's goal for this webcast is to inspire an overall curiosity into all of the change that is currently happening, and to begin to gain a firm understanding of how the Industry works around, and is very often driven by, the Digital Age in which we live.
 
Stephen Balsley began his career at a RED Digital Cinema nearly 9 years ago, and has watched it grow from a small startup company into one of the leading Cinema brands in the world. During that time, the RED One camera was largely credited with driving the shift from Film to Digital, with RED cameras now being used in a large number of films and other projects across the Industry. Although Stephen’s expertise is in RED, he is well experienced in all types of cameras, including Arri, Canon, Nikon, Blackmagic, and more.

What You'll Learn

  • Viewing Digital Media as one interconnected universe
    • Enabling yourself for a successful career by redefining what it means to “make it” in Hollywood.
  • Capitalizing on the shift to Digital- Specific Examples
    • The explosion of Film in China, India, and new markets for content
    • Learning from Stephen Soderberg, Peter Jackson, David Fincher, and James Cameron
  • Making sense of a series of technology revolutions
    • Music Industry and Digital Copyright
    • DSLR and the “Indie Filmmaker”
    • Combining Television and the Internet
    • The Film Industry and the 4K Revolution
  • Understanding new markets and opportunities
    • What this means to you- How to capitalize on the rapid change in technology
    • Know the rules for Netflix, Youtube, DCP, etc. – what are the rules? How do you find them?
    • How to streamline your production technology to match your content
  • Final Note on collaborating for your project & funds.
  • Q&A with Stephen

About Your Instructor

Stephen Balsley began his career at a RED Digital Cinema nearly 9 years ago, and has watched it grow from a small startup company into one of the leading Cinema brands in the world. During that time, the RED One camera was largely credited with driving the shift from Film to Digital, with RED cameras now being used in a large number of films and other projects across the Industry. Although Stephen’s expertise is in RED, he is well experienced in all types of cameras, including Arri, Canon, Nikon, Blackmagic, and more.

In his role as a camera and lens technician, he has had experience working with everyone from the largest production companies to the first-time independent filmmaker. He specializes in system integration, integrating digital cinema cameras into 3D systems, VR, Underwater and Shotover rigs, drones, large array based systems, and live 4K.

As a camera operator, he has filmed 2 Rose Bowls, a BCS Championship game, and a UFC Championship, along with a diverse portfolio of other side projects.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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