How To Pitch Your TV Pilot To Cable Networks

Hosted by Jordan Barel

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Jordan Barel

Webinar hosted by: Jordan Barel

Producer, Publisher at Loaded Barrel Studios

Jordan Barel (Legal, Producer) is a writer, producer and lawyer for Loaded Barrel Studios. Based in LA, he's worked for New Line Cinema, AMC, Verve Talent Agency and was recently named in Variety's Hollywood Movers and Shakers list. Jordan is the scribe behind the Elon Musk biopic script "The Man From Tomorrow".  Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Cable networks all have their niche. For example, AMC has really honed in on intense dramas, such as The Walking Dead, Breaking Bad, and Mad Men; USA focuses on character driven mystery dramas such as CSI, House, and NCIS; TBS centers around comedy sitcoms like The Big Bang Theory, Ground Floor, and Cougar Town; ABC Family focuses more on sitcoms relating to family, such as Melissa and Joey, Baby Daddy and The Fosters.

Knowing how to tailor your pitch to a specific cable network opens up immense opportunity for your TV pilot. Every cable network can be a real home for your work - it’s just a matter of the how, when, and why. Knowing how to appeal to multiple networks gives your pilot a better chance of getting picked up!

In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, host Jordan Barel will teach you both how to pitch your pilot and how to tailor your pitch to the right cable network. In addition, he’ll go over what kind of shows live on each network currently, and what may be the right fit for you. You will walk away with a clear understanding of how to pitch effectively as well as a clear understanding of how to make your pilot what each network is looking for.

Your host host Jordan Barel is a writer, producer and lawyer for Loaded Barrel Studios. Based in LA, he's worked for New Line Cinema, AMC, Verve Talent Agency and was recently named in Variety's Hollywood Movers and Shakers list. He worked for Paul Scheer through his producing deal at FOX, working on development with his projects as well as bringing in new writers for him. Jordan also works at Abominable Pictures in their comedy and TV department. Previously, he worked as the Television Coordinator for Verve Literary Agency, producing the company's staffing video which lead to a 200% increase in the company's staffed writers. While there he also vetted all new TV and film clients. Jordan knows what will make your pitch stand out and is here exclusively for Stage 32 to help guide our writers toward success!

What You'll Learn

  • What is your show?
    • Understanding if it is a comedy, a multi cam, limited etc. and why knowing that is important when pitching.
  • How to describe it to somebody else who’s not your Mom.
    • Because she always understands you and strangers well…don’t.
  • The Executive lifestyle.
    • Be in the shoes of the seller for a moment and then you’ll know what they want to hear!
  • What are the essential elements that need to be said out loud in your pitch?
    • Jaws meets ET - yep, contrary to popular belief, you can meet in the middle.
  • What should you absolutely NOT say in your pitch!
    • “It starts off with” - nobody cares. Sadly.
  • The Bible/Treatment.
    • Where are you going after your pilot? Because if you pitch well, someone will ask.
  • The nuts and bolts of a pilot.
    • Even though it’s just a pitch, knowing structure always helps.
  • What networks are currently looking for.
    • No reason to pitch a Horror show to FX, they kind of have a good one right now…
  • How can your pilot fit those needs?
    • Did you say the main family needs 2 Dads? Well that’s what I meant!
  • TV season – From Development through Staffing.
    • When are people looking to buy, and looking to buy you.
  • The agent/manager/producer game.
    • How to get the right ones, and when they are/are not necessary.
  • When to rewrite.
    • When NBC says it’s too “jokey” does that mean you need to cut the jokes today?
  • The practice pitch.
    • Because the pros spend time as actors rehearsing theirs’ as scripts – shouldn’t you?
  • Q&A with Jordan!

About Your Instructor

Jordan Barel (Legal, Producer) is a writer, producer and lawyer for Loaded Barrel Studios. Based in LA, he's worked for New Line Cinema, AMC, Verve Talent Agency and was recently named in Variety's Hollywood Movers and Shakers list. Jordan is the scribe behind the Elon Musk biopic script "The Man From Tomorrow". 

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • I took this course earlier in the year last year; it was a good course filled with good information, and some information and other networks that were possible connections to reach out to. Within this type of industry, any and all information that could lead to some new door being opened is always good information - even if it's just knowing that that door exists.

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