How to Get Pitch Meetings For Your Project

Hosted by Jay Glazer

$49

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Jay Glazer

Webinar hosted by: Jay Glazer

Manager at ROAR Entertainment

Jay Glazer is a manager/producer at ROAR who represents creatives in both the talent and literary fields and whose clients have appeared in Emmy-winning SHAMELESS, GAME OF THRONES, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, MAD MEN, Netflix's THE WITCHER and many more. Prior to joining ROAR, Jay worked for Brillstein Entertainment Partners and The Gersh Agency. Jay has found success in his roles by understanding how to secure important pitch meetings for himself and his clients, and he’s ready to share what he knows exclusively with the Stage 32 community. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

No matter how great your script or story is, it’s not going to become a reality unless you’re able to pitch it effectively to the buyers and people who can help you get it made. Yet before you can even pitch it, you have to get in the room in the first place, and find someone willing to hear what you have to say. Getting that meeting is a skill in and of itself, and you’re going to need more than a good script and a good pitch to get the ball rolling. The good news is in this ever-evolving marketplace, there are myriad opportunities to get your project in front of interested people. The better you understand the industry and the world of pitch meetings, the better your pitch will work for you.

Pitching is a form of sales. Whether you are selling your script, your ideas, or yourself, it is critical to understand your audience -- who they are, how they do business, and how they will evaluate your project. The more we can analyze who we are pitching to and how they are defining opportunity and success, the better equipped we will be to get a YES, and conversely, evaluate whether the individual or company we are pitching to is well suited for us. Let’s delve into how to make this happen.

Jay Glazer is a manager/producer at ROAR who represents creatives in both the talent and literary fields and whose clients have appeared in Emmy-winning SHAMELESS, GAME OF THRONES, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, MAD MEN, Netflix's THE WITCHER and many more. Prior to joining ROAR, Jay worked for Brillstein Entertainment Partners and The Gersh Agency. Jay has found success in his roles by understanding how to secure important pitch meetings for himself and his clients, and he’s ready to share what he knows exclusively with the Stage 32 community.

Jay will lay out how pitch meetings work and what you should be doing to land pitch meetings for your own project. He’ll begin by going through the basics of pitch meetings and the types you should expect, including generals, producers, talent pitches, packaging pitch, studio buyers and independent financiers. He’ll discuss how you should know who to pitch and the best ways to start outreach. Jay will then delve into how pitches are set and who does what, including whether you can set a meeting solo, and how to work with partners, production companies, managers, and agents. He’ll go through resources you have at your disposal and how best to prepare for your meeting, including with your script, pitch deck, and comps. Finally he will lay out the best way to approach someone for a pitch meeting, including what you should and shouldn’t include in your request and what time of day and day of the week works best for this outreach. He’ll even offer examples of both email and phone call approaches you can use.

 

Jay will give you the knowledge and confidence to land the pitch meeting you’ve been working towards and nail it.

What You'll Learn

  • How to Get Pitch Meetings
    • What are pitches and what is your responsibility?
  • Types Pitch Meetings – Who is your audience and what can they do for you?
    • Script Pitch (general)
    • Producer
    • Talent Pitch (actor)
    • Packaging Pitch (director, cast, additional element)
    • Buyer (studio)
    • Buyer (independent financier)
  • How Do You Know Who to Pitch?
    • Setting goals -- what is your strategy/steps?
    • Analysis - who do I need to involve and what are their roles?
    • Resources - practice pitching
  • Outreach
    • How to ask for an introduction
    • How to cold pitch
  • How Are Pitches Set and Who Does What?
    • Can you get a pitch meeting solo?
    • Partners
    • Production Companies
    • Manager
    • Agent
  • Resources
    • Variety Insight
    • Studio System
    • IMDBPro
    • External Resources for Contact Information
    • Trades
  • How to Prepare / Assets to Present
    • Script
    • Pitch Deck
    • Comps
  • Approaching
    • What should you include in the request for a meeting?
    • What should you NOT include?
    • Examples of email approaches
    • Examples of call approaches
    • What time of day/ What day of the week?
  • Q&A with Jay

About Your Instructor

Jay Glazer is a manager/producer at ROAR who represents creatives in both the talent and literary fields and whose clients have appeared in Emmy-winning SHAMELESS, GAME OF THRONES, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, MAD MEN, Netflix's THE WITCHER and many more. Prior to joining ROAR, Jay worked for Brillstein Entertainment Partners and The Gersh Agency. Jay has found success in his roles by understanding how to secure important pitch meetings for himself and his clients, and he’s ready to share what he knows exclusively with the Stage 32 community.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

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A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

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A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

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