How to Get Pitch Meetings For Your Project

Hosted by Jay Glazer

$49

On Demand Webinar - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

Start Learning

Please make sure you use the same email address as the one you use to sign in to Stage 32, otherwise you won't have access to your webinar.
apply Your coupon will be applied after you agree to terms below.

- or -

$49.00
TOTAL PRICE:
Overlay Icon

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Jay Glazer

Webinar hosted by: Jay Glazer

Manager at ROAR Entertainment

Jay Glazer is a manager/producer at ROAR who represents creatives in both the talent and literary fields and whose clients have appeared in Emmy-winning SHAMELESS, GAME OF THRONES, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, MAD MEN, Netflix's THE WITCHER and many more. Prior to joining ROAR, Jay worked for Brillstein Entertainment Partners and The Gersh Agency. Jay has found success in his roles by understanding how to secure important pitch meetings for himself and his clients, and he’s ready to share what he knows exclusively with the Stage 32 community. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

No matter how great your script or story is, it’s not going to become a reality unless you’re able to pitch it effectively to the buyers and people who can help you get it made. Yet before you can even pitch it, you have to get in the room in the first place, and find someone willing to hear what you have to say. Getting that meeting is a skill in and of itself, and you’re going to need more than a good script and a good pitch to get the ball rolling. The good news is in this ever-evolving marketplace, there are myriad opportunities to get your project in front of interested people. The better you understand the industry and the world of pitch meetings, the better your pitch will work for you.

Pitching is a form of sales. Whether you are selling your script, your ideas, or yourself, it is critical to understand your audience -- who they are, how they do business, and how they will evaluate your project. The more we can analyze who we are pitching to and how they are defining opportunity and success, the better equipped we will be to get a YES, and conversely, evaluate whether the individual or company we are pitching to is well suited for us. Let’s delve into how to make this happen.

Jay Glazer is a manager/producer at ROAR who represents creatives in both the talent and literary fields and whose clients have appeared in Emmy-winning SHAMELESS, GAME OF THRONES, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, MAD MEN, Netflix's THE WITCHER and many more. Prior to joining ROAR, Jay worked for Brillstein Entertainment Partners and The Gersh Agency. Jay has found success in his roles by understanding how to secure important pitch meetings for himself and his clients, and he’s ready to share what he knows exclusively with the Stage 32 community.

Jay will lay out how pitch meetings work and what you should be doing to land pitch meetings for your own project. He’ll begin by going through the basics of pitch meetings and the types you should expect, including generals, producers, talent pitches, packaging pitch, studio buyers and independent financiers. He’ll discuss how you should know who to pitch and the best ways to start outreach. Jay will then delve into how pitches are set and who does what, including whether you can set a meeting solo, and how to work with partners, production companies, managers, and agents. He’ll go through resources you have at your disposal and how best to prepare for your meeting, including with your script, pitch deck, and comps. Finally he will lay out the best way to approach someone for a pitch meeting, including what you should and shouldn’t include in your request and what time of day and day of the week works best for this outreach. He’ll even offer examples of both email and phone call approaches you can use.

 

Jay will give you the knowledge and confidence to land the pitch meeting you’ve been working towards and nail it.

What You'll Learn

  • How to Get Pitch Meetings
    • What are pitches and what is your responsibility?
  • Types Pitch Meetings – Who is your audience and what can they do for you?
    • Script Pitch (general)
    • Producer
    • Talent Pitch (actor)
    • Packaging Pitch (director, cast, additional element)
    • Buyer (studio)
    • Buyer (independent financier)
  • How Do You Know Who to Pitch?
    • Setting goals -- what is your strategy/steps?
    • Analysis - who do I need to involve and what are their roles?
    • Resources - practice pitching
  • Outreach
    • How to ask for an introduction
    • How to cold pitch
  • How Are Pitches Set and Who Does What?
    • Can you get a pitch meeting solo?
    • Partners
    • Production Companies
    • Manager
    • Agent
  • Resources
    • Variety Insight
    • Studio System
    • IMDBPro
    • External Resources for Contact Information
    • Trades
  • How to Prepare / Assets to Present
    • Script
    • Pitch Deck
    • Comps
  • Approaching
    • What should you include in the request for a meeting?
    • What should you NOT include?
    • Examples of email approaches
    • Examples of call approaches
    • What time of day/ What day of the week?
  • Q&A with Jay

About Your Instructor

Jay Glazer is a manager/producer at ROAR who represents creatives in both the talent and literary fields and whose clients have appeared in Emmy-winning SHAMELESS, GAME OF THRONES, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, MAD MEN, Netflix's THE WITCHER and many more. Prior to joining ROAR, Jay worked for Brillstein Entertainment Partners and The Gersh Agency. Jay has found success in his roles by understanding how to secure important pitch meetings for himself and his clients, and he’s ready to share what he knows exclusively with the Stage 32 community.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

Other education that may be of interest to you:

Think Like an Entrepreneur - How to Be Profitable on a Sub EUR 1 Million Film in the European Market - With a Film Case Study

As an independent filmmaker or producer, you likely start working on a new endeavor for creative reasons—the chance to tell an amazing story, build worlds, create something of cultural value. Yet this is, of course, not the only element of filmmaking. Like it or not, your independent film is not just a creative endeavor; it’s also a business. You’re sourcing financing and bringing in investors, building a team, and creating a property that will (hopefully) ultimately make money not only in the present, but for years to come. In short, you’re not just a making a piece of art; you’re also running a business. To operate successfully in the world of independent film and continue to make films that you’re proud of, you need to be able to think like an entrepreneur and understand the dynamics and the relation between financing, distribution and recoupment of film investments. Further, you need to open up your creative mindset to the myriad opportunities available all over the world including hot markets found throughout Europe. The business side of films is often especially difficult for filmmakers and creative producers, but the more you understand, the better your chances of finding a production partner or investor to take your vision forward. Working in the European market, especially with films in the €1MM and sub€1MM range can offer you opportunities you haven't thought of before. But to take advantage of this surging market, you need to understand the variety of production and financing options available and how to tap into them. Whether it's hard money, soft money or other methods toward financing and securing the necessary pieces to greenlight your project, getting a handle on the in's and out's of how to proceed will put you in a powerful and advantageous position. Understanding and executing this business model will open new doors to other productions around the world and serve to create a portfolio of proof that will serve as a calling card moving forward.  David Zannoni is an international business specialist for Fintage House, the world's most respected company for revenue and rights protection for industry professionals and companies. David negotiates agreements for films and television series and is involved in business development and relationship management specifically in the US, Latin America and Europe. As an international film business specialist David is continuously present to make deals and speak at international film markets, festivals and conferences, including: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Europe, and all over Latin America. David is intimately familiar with how independent films are financed and made profitable all over the world and will share what he knows exclusively about the European market with the Stage 32 community. David will focus on the European market and walk you through what you need to know to finance your independent film, EUR1MM or less, and leave profitable. He will begin by explaining what a EUR1MM or under budget looks like, whether it’s considered a small film or microbudget, and how it compares in the larger worldwide film market. He’ll delve into how film financing works specifically in Europe, including a breakdown of soft money sources versus hard money sources, debt financing versus equity financing, tax and location incentives, and film funds and government support. He will also discuss working with a co-production as a financing tool. He will highlight how European film financing is different compared to other regions and the different levels of film financing to consider: European, national, and regional. David will next demonstrate the importance of language, culture, and collaboration and will then teach you what specifically Europe can offer for both European and non-European productions, including incentives, co-productions, diversity, talent, and shooting locations. He will explain how to approach your film as an asset, how to see yourself as an entrepreneur, and how to see filmmaking as a business. David will then go over the continental circle of financing, distribution, and investment recoupment and will explain how risk mitigation works for European film projects. Next he will discuss managing revenue and rights, as well as managing recoupment as a whole. He will spend time delving into European film contracts, including distribution agreements, CAM agreements, and sales agency agreements. David will ultimately illustrate whether European films can be profitable and how, and analyze with you when a European film can be considered successful, whether it breaks even or finds profitability. Plus, David will show a case study of a real EUR1MM European film to illustrate how a film of this level can be profitable and exactly how the money flows through from beginning to end. He’ll show financing documents and spreadsheets to illustrate the financing structure and demonstrate how money flows in and out. Through this detailed and practical demonstration, you will leave with strategies and a deep understanding of how to approach your own EUR1MM film as an entrepreneur and build a finance structure that will leave you and your investors profitable. This Stage 32 Webinar is Part 2 in David’s "Think Like an Entrepreneur" series. Click here to check out David’s webinar on being profitable in US marketplace with a sub-$1MM film.   Praise for David's Previous Stage 32 Webinars   "David is incredible and lovely and clearly knows his stuff." - Cynthia P.   "Eye-opening information. A no-brainer approach that wouldn't be so obvious to the uninitiated." - Gary O.   "By far, the best class I've seen on the subject." Kirk K.   "David is a fantastic teacher. And what a voice! I could listen to him all day. More importantly, I learned so very much!" - Isabella T.  

Screenwriters, Producers, Filmmakers - Get Smart, Get Legal, Get Protected - With 40-Page Downloadable Workbook!

There's nothing worse than having a screenplay bought or a project with financing get placed on hold because of legal issues that could have been handled at the start. Too many projects have been shelved permanently and will never see the light of day because of conflicts and misunderstandings that could easily have been avoided.  Unfortunately, few screenwriters, filmmakers or producers know the right questions that need to be asked and answered in order to protect yourself and your project legally. It doesn't need to be this way, though. There are simple legal steps you can take from the beginning to assure a smooth and steady ride so your focus can be on making the best project possible. Especially for those in creative fields, navigating legal issues can feel overwhelming and confusing, maybe even unnecessary. Yet having a basic legal understanding of how to protect your work and property is incredibly crucial. You need to know how to legally incorporate everyone's input and notes into your script without worrying about losing authorship. You need to know how to set up a partnership for success and why so many people run into trouble when doing so. You need to know when it's okay to agree to work for free or 'on spec' and why it's still vital to have a written agreement. And you need to know when it's okay to talk business on your own behalf. The good news is you don't need to pass the bar in order to ensure you and your projects are in good legal shape. Instead, you just need a little guidance.  Producer and attorney Gary W. Goldstein, has produced some of the biggest box office hits in film history and has served as a mentor to dozens of prestigious writers, producers, and filmmakers. His credits include PRETTY WOMAN, UNDER SIEGE, THE MOTHMAN PROPHECIES, and many more. He's also papered some of the biggest deals in film history. By working as both a producer and entertainment attorney, Gary's knowledge of deal memos and contracts is without peer. He knows all the do's and don'ts, the tips and tricks, and the side streets and alleyways toward making sure that you are not only protected, but getting the benefits and compensation you deserve for your efforts.  Now, exclusively for Stage 32, Gary will present a complete "how to" in order to assure that you use a proven and smart approach to protecting yourself legally. He will teach you his 3 rules that should never be broken when entering into deals; whether you should use an agent or an attorney (or both) to negotiate your compensation and benefits on your behalf; how to deal with release forms and option agreements and how to assure you get everything in writing so there are no surprises or disappointments down the road. He will show you how to maintain a paper trail of all communication and why it's monumentally important to do so. He will discuss the realities of maintaining creative control and how to handle the creative contributions of others as well as the pitfalls to avoid when receiving feedback. He will instruct you on the qualities of finding a good creative or business partner or partners and the essential questions to ask up front.  As if all this wasn't enough, Gary will provide a 40-page interactive workbook exclusive for those who take this webinar. This is an invaluable resource!   Huge Praise for Gary!   "Here’s some practical advice for those seeking a career in Hollywood, from someone who really knows what the hell he's talking about." - J.F. Lawton, Screenwriter (PRETTY WOMAN, UNDER SIEGE)   "When I met Gary, I had nothing but talent and a drive to succeed. Nine months later, I had my first script option, my first studio writing assignment, and a Writers Guild card. The advice here is worth its weight in gold" - Allison Burnett, Screenwriter & Director (AUTUMN IN NEW YORK, FEAST OF LOVE, GONE AND UNDISCOVERED GYRL)   "When I became your student, I was a mom with a script. Now, I'm a series writer-producer-director. Thank you for helping me achieve one of my biggest dreams. And thank you for this class. You continue to amaze." - Sally Rubin, Screenwriter, Producer, Author   "Gary W. Goldstein’s mentoring will prove 100% better than whatever else you may be considering. He will change your life." - Marilyn Warda, author, The Randomness of Life   "I’ve learned more about how things really work from Gary than I have over the past 10 years and countless other classes!"  -  Angela Falkowska, Screenwriter   "The workbook alone is worth 10 times what the webinar cost. I am in awe. Thank you, Gary." - Antonio T.   "Again, Stage 32 outdoes itself. What a score landing Gary. He's a legend." Jason R.   "Gary, you had me from minute one. Amazing information. And delivered with class and style. -Angela P.    

First Act Blueprint: Setting Up Your Screenplay For Success

Many of us are familiar with the tropes made popular by screenplay gurus like Syd Field and Blake Snyder. Yes, it's true that many great films can be broken down into three clean acts or thirteen story beats. But the same can be said for many unwatchable films too. What are the elements that differentiate the great screenplays from the purely mediocre? In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, creative executive from Zucker Productions (director Jerry Zucker's production company), Farrell Ingle will define the importance of the ever imposing first act of a feature screenplay.  He will show you how much of the groundwork for your story needs to be laid in the first act of your screenplay. If those early pages aren't up to snuff, the rest of your story will suffer, no matter how fantastic the ending is. Your host, Farrell will lay out the many pitfalls writers stumble into without necessarily realizing it while they craft the set-up of their story. Using examples of classic films, you will understand how top notch writing creates multitudes of subtext, character development, and plot advancement with each scene. We will also discuss what constitutes an "act" and why it's so very dangerous to hold yourself within the box of a rigid structure. By the end of this lecture, you should be able to go back through your own writing and break down each scene in your script to ensure that you're putting yourself in a position to succeed. After all, the first act is the most important act for readers and executives when evaluating your ability as a screenwriter. Plus, you will break down the first acts beats of well-known movie scripts as Farrell leads you through an in-depth analysis of films such as Raiders of the Lost Ark, The Professional, Die Hard and more!

Adapting IP: How Do I Know if My Idea Should Be Written as a Film, TV Series or Podcast?

Over the past few years, studios, independent production companies, networks and streamers have been turning to stories based on IP (Intellectual Property). Often times screenwriters, filmmakers and producers find great source material based on a book, article, life or public domain and the next part is struggling to figure out how to adapt it. You want to make sure that you are able to tell your story in the best possible way. Could it make a good movie? Or, do you have more elements that could make it extend longer into a full TV show? Or, what about creating a podcast that could sell? Making this crucial decision on how to adapt your story can help accelerate your path toward success.    When embarking on a strategy to figure out how to adapt your IP, it's important to understand the potential and the limitations within the material. This includes considering many variables including the genre, budget, and story beats. Although you may have begun with a specific format in mind, sometimes you may find that your material may inherently lend itself to one format or another. So, how do you truncate a story into a 110 page script? Should you include more characters and write a pilot that can serve multiple seasons? Could you write a podcast to help your characters come to life?  Understanding your audience and where that audience consumes content today might alter your thinking. And, most importantly, you must be paying attention to the marketplace - what's selling, who it sold to, where it will live - so that you don't waste time and navigate the landscape in a productive, more successful manner.   Jim Young of Animus Films is a leading independent non-fiction producer, with almost two dozen films under his belt. Jim has created a successful career producing true-story films such as THE CATCHER WAS A SPY with Paul Rudd, LIFE OF A KING with Oscar-winner Cuba Gooding Jr., THE MAN WHO KNEW INFINITY with Oscar-nominee Dev Patel, LOVELACE with Oscar-nominee James Franco and Amanda Seyfried, and the upcoming film, THE PEOPLE VS. VEGAS DAVE. Jim has a long history of producing critically acclaimed features and documentaries including YEAR OF THE BULL at Showtime, THE WORDS with Oscar-nominee Bradley Cooper and Zoe Saldana. Almost all of Jim's projects are based off of IP and he has a clear grip on what adapts best to what medium and what the marketplace is currently looking for.    Jim will go over how determine your objective for your project whether you're a director, writer, actor or a hybrid. He'll go over what is important to you in the overall process in order to help you be clear on what you want to get out of adapting your IP into a film, television pilot or podcast - whether it be creative satisfaction, financial gain or proof of concept. He'll go over what the flow of your story is - open ended or single climax, event vs. character driven and visual vs. storytelling. He'll help you determine your writing style to help cater to which format will work best for your project, discussing comparisons between X-FILES, DIE HARD, STAR WARS and STAR TREK. You'll learn how different genres and budgets play into a project based off of IP. And, most helpful, Jim will go over the current marketplace in terms of popularity of projects based on IP, and break down the pros and cons of working in each medium - film, television and podcast. You will have a clear direction on which format will work best for your project.    Like what you heard from Jim from during this webcast? Send your script to Jim and speak with him for an hour by clicking here.     Praise for Jim's Stage 32 Webinars:   "This was my first webinar and I learned so much. I thought Jim was thorough in his descriptions of what each medium has to offer regarding IP" -Marietta K.   "Jim opened up new avenues for our IP that I didn't realize existed. He was a great presenter and shared his own experience with relevant info. It was really motivating." -Ricki L.   "Thoughtful way of exploring options. Using podcasts was inspirational." -JoAnne E.   "Tons of new information. Thanks!" -Jacqueline L.

How to Write a Unique, Commercial Horror Script

4 part class taught by Stuart Arbury, Director of Development at Captivate Entertainment (Universal)!AVAILABLE ON DEMAND! The number one genre we hear most executives look for is horror. Horror written in any language can be easily enjoyed by any viewer from around the world. It's the most universally acceptable genre out there, and it's where filmmakers go to cut their teeth (Sam Raimi, James Gunn, Oliver Stone, Peter Jackson, Francis Ford Coppola, James Cameron, Zack Snyder, and Steven Spielberg all started in the horror genre). But writing a fresh, commercial, scary horror is getting harder as executives continue to see familiar tropes and generic set pieces. What a writer sees as a fresh idea, is one that an executive has probably seen in some variation many times over. Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 4 part class: How to Write a Unique, Commercial Horror Script taught by Stuart Arbury, Director of Development at Captivate Entertainment (Universal). From choosing a concept to picking an antagonist, from strengthening the emotional crescendo to amping up the scares in your project – Stuart covers all in this 4 part intensive class.   **Plus! You'll get a copy of the HALLOWEEN script in your resources!   Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.Although Stuart is no longer handing out or reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all creatives to participate.

Distinct Dialogue & Character Voices

When your characters each have their own voice, you should be able to tell them apart by their dialogue alone. We challenged you to write a scene removing all character names and descriptions so that each character is distinguishable by their dialogue alone.

register for stage 32 Register / Log In