How To Rock TV Staffing Season: Be Good In A Room

Hosted by Marla White

$49

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Marla White

Webinar hosted by: Marla White

Former Head of TV for Emmy Award Winner Peter Tolan's Fedora Entertainment

Marla is former head of TV for Emmy Award winning writer & producer Peter Tolan's Fedora Entertainment with experience producing prime time series and award nominated television movies in multiple genres. She's worked with writers who have sold pitches to Fox, TNT, CBS, NBC and ABC and have been staffed on premium cable dramas. Clients include writers who have won awards including a Nicholl Fellowship finalist, as well as published novelists. Companies like CAA and Oxygen rely on her skills as a story analyst and story development expert for people who are ready to take their writing to the next level.Writers who have worked with Marla have said, "Marla's approach has changed the way I will pitch forever" and "She has incredible ideas, tremendous patience, and a true sense of character, tone, and place" While one client called her "a fun, hip, whip-smart fairy godmother."When she's not reading scripts or selling projects, you can find her indulging in a cozy mystery, working in her garden or out at the ranch on her horses. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

As a television writer, staffing season is a high-intensity, high-stakes time. You not only need to show your chops with your writing talent, but you also need to show what you will be like in a writing room. Many writers are vying for the same spots, so how do you stand out? How do you make an impression in front of the executives and producers hiring? 

We've brought in Marla White, the former development executive for Emmy-Award Winner Peter Tolan's Fedora Entertainment who has sat in on hundreds of writer meetings from the executive side of the table. She's worked with writers who have sold pitches to Fox, TNT, CBS, NBC and ABC and have been staffed on premium cable dramas.

Marla will take you through the thought process of what executives are looking for when you walk in the room. She'll walk you through the difference between a general meeting and a staffing meeting and arm you with all the tools necessary to be "good in the room" for each case. Plus, she'll also talk about "do's and don'ts" and how you can get invited back for the all important pitch meeting.

This webinar will be useful for every level of writer, whether you’re just starting out in your writing career as preparation to talk to agents or managers, or if you are a working writer on a show looking to move to a new show and need tips on playing the networking game. You don't want to miss out on learning from one of the industry's top executives!

 

What You'll Learn

  • Why getting comfortable in meetings is key for every writer
  • General Meetings
    • The purpose of a general meeting from a producer’s POV
    • How to not tank your own meeting
    • Best ways to get in the door
    • What writing samples you’ll need
      • Is “good” good enough to get you in the door?
    • Research the company – what have they done?
    • Discover information about the person you’re meeting with
      • How making a personal connection makes a difference
      • Why should they want to work with you
    • Be ready to tell the story of you!
    • Ask questions, especially what they’re working on/looking for
    • The pitch you need to have in your pocket that leaves them wanting more
      • Short pitch being a 3 – 5-minute version of your pitch
      • Don’t tell everything – the goal is to get them to say ‘tell me more’
      • Have a backup idea in case
      • Following up vs. stalking
  • Staffing Meeting
    • What a producer is looking to learn
    • How to’s of getting a meeting on the show you want/need
    • The perfect staffing sample – why you need more than one
      • Being memorable vs. sellable
      • Original pilot vs. spec of existing show
      • The tone is key
    • A strong meeting vs ‘meh’
      • Preparation is key
    • Get to know them – and let producers know you
    • Read the pilot script
      • Read the competition as well
    • Be ready to talk about characters & future story ideas
    • Show your passion for project, don’t just tell
    • Your personal connection to the series
    • Be interesting!
    • Being positive goes a long way
    • Most effective follow-up tools
    • Tales from the Darkside – good meetings gone wrong
  • Staying Connected
    • Keeping the door open to come back

Plus, a live and in-depth Q&A with Marla!

About Your Instructor

Marla is former head of TV for Emmy Award winning writer & producer Peter Tolan's Fedora Entertainment with experience producing prime time series and award nominated television movies in multiple genres. She's worked with writers who have sold pitches to Fox, TNT, CBS, NBC and ABC and have been staffed on premium cable dramas. Clients include writers who have won awards including a Nicholl Fellowship finalist, as well as published novelists. Companies like CAA and Oxygen rely on her skills as a story analyst and story development expert for people who are ready to take their writing to the next level.

Writers who have worked with Marla have said, "Marla's approach has changed the way I will pitch forever" and "She has incredible ideas, tremendous patience, and a true sense of character, tone, and place" While one client called her "a fun, hip, whip-smart fairy godmother."

When she's not reading scripts or selling projects, you can find her indulging in a cozy mystery, working in her garden or out at the ranch on her horses.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! For a live webinar, you will be given the link within 2 business days after the live session.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • Very well-organized and constructed, and extremely informative. Fun and educational.

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