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The Quibi Revolution - How to Write, Pitch and Sell a Project to a Short Form Streaming Platform

Hosted by Tripper Clancy

$49

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Tripper Clancy

Webinar hosted by: Tripper Clancy

Screenwriter at Stuber (FOX), I Am Not Okay With This (Netflix), Varsity Blues & Die Hart (Quibi)

Tripper is a screenwriter who dabbles in tv and film, comedy and drama. His credits include STUBER for 20th Century Fox, I AM NOT OKAY WITH THIS for Netflix, and two new shows for Quibi: DIE HART, an action-comedy starring Kevin Hart and John Travolta, as well as VARSITY BLUES, a modern day reimagining of the original movie. A graduate of Wake Forest undergrad and The University of Texas grad school, Tripper lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Maggie, and their daughters, Olive and Ruby. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

For many years in the industry, there were only three types of scripts that a working film or TV writer would ever be asked to write: a feature-length script, an hour-long TV script or a half-hour TV script. But with the addition of Quibi as a major driver of content and a serious player in the entertainment space, more and more writers are finding themselves working in a newer, short-format style of writing. In this webinar, Tripper Clancy, who has sold two shows to Quibi, will discuss how a Quibi show is made: from conception, to pitch, to writing, and ultimately to production. It’s not rocket science, but it’s definitely unlike anything else in the TV landscape right now and it's something you should learn to have another tool to be armed with.

If you’ve got your sights set on becoming a working screenwriter in the industry, you may already know exactly what you want to write. Perhaps you want to be staffed on a particular HBO show. Or you have the perfect pitch for Netflix. Or you wrote a feature script that Blumhouse would love. Well, one of the things you’ll learn is that the secret to making a living as a writer is being open-minded about who pays your bills. And in TV, that means that a pitch that you knew was perfect for Amazon may actually end up at Quibi. And suddenly you’ll find yourself wondering how the hell you’re go tell a story that you imagined in one format in an entirely different, much shorter manner. When that moment happens, you need to understand how to be flexible with your story, and how you can adapt it to Quibi’s format.

Tripper Clancy is a screenwriter who dabbles in TV and film, comedy and drama. His credits include STUBER for 20th Century Fox, I AM NOT OKAY WITH THIS for Netflix, and two new shows for Quibi: DIE HART, an action-comedy starring Kevin Hart and John Travolta, as well as VARSITY BLUES, a modern day reimagining of the original movie. Tripper has carved out a successful career as a writer and has entered into short form storytelling with Quibi as a medium. Exclusively for Stage 32 Tripper will give you insight on how to write for a short streamer like Quibi.

Tripper will go over a general overview of writing the the film and TV industry, including how to break in and the roles managers, agents and attorneys play in your journey. You'll get an understanding of specs vs. OWA (open writing assignments), how to pitch and how to get staffed. After you have a clear understanding of the general landscape, Tripper will dive into the similarities and differences between Quibi and traditional TV. You will know the length of time per episode, number of episodes and how they roll the episodes to the public. You'll get to learn the SVOD model and the pros and cons of writing for a streamer like Quibi vs. broadcast/streamers. Tripper will teach you how to approach pitching a Quibi show, how to develop the concept and what to pitch in the meeting. Finally, Tripper will teach you how to write for a Quibi show using case studies of his two Quibi shows: FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS and DIE HART with Kevin Hart. You will walk away with a clear understanding of the short form storytelling eco-system for a short streamer like Quibi. 

 

"With short form storytelling being the new wave of the future on how audiences watch content, it's important you know how to approach it, develop it, pitch it and write it. Let me show you how I used a specific approach toward selling 2 shows to Quibi."

- Tripper Clancy

What You'll Learn

General Overview of Writing in the Film/TV Industry

Before we discuss the nuts and bolts of Quibi, we’ll first talk generally about writing in the TV/Film industry and specifically how a TV show is typically written for a broadcast network or streamer:

  • How a Writer Breaks Into the Biz
  • The Roles of Agents, Managers and Attorneys
  • The Roles of Producers vs. Studio/Network Execs
  • Feature Specs vs. OWAs (Open Writing Assignments)
  • Pitching a TV show
  • Staffing or being staffed on a TV show
  • Writing a TV show

Similarities and Difference Between Quibi and Traditional TV

  • Length of time per episode/chapter
  • Number of episodes/chapters in a season
  • How they roll out episodes/chapters to the public
  • SVOD (Subscription Video on Demand) model
  • The Financial Pros/Cons of Writing for Quibi vs. Broadcast/Streamers

How to Approach Pitching a Quibi Show

  • My Personal Experiences with Quibi on my Two Shows 
    • FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS
    • DIE HART with Kevin Hart
  • Developing the Concept (Is this a Movie or a TV Show?)
  • Setting the Meeting
  • Pitch Format
  • What You Need to Accomplish in the Room

How to Approach Writing a Quibi Show

  • The Psychological: Writer’s Room of One
  • Structure of Quibi Scripts
  • Understanding the Limitations of the Format
  • Understanding the Limitations of the Physical Production Budget
  • How to Approach Rewrites of Your Quibi Episodes/Chapters
  • How to Approach Scripts in Preparation for Production

Q&A with Tripper!

About Your Instructor

Tripper is a screenwriter who dabbles in tv and film, comedy and drama. His credits include STUBER for 20th Century Fox, I AM NOT OKAY WITH THIS for Netflix, and two new shows for Quibi: DIE HART, an action-comedy starring Kevin Hart and John Travolta, as well as VARSITY BLUES, a modern day reimagining of the original movie. A graduate of Wake Forest undergrad and The University of Texas grad school, Tripper lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Maggie, and their daughters, Olive and Ruby.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • Excellent, honest, clear information regarding industry realities.

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