Navigating Your Film Into a Major Film Festival

Hosted by Amanda Johnson-Zetterstrom

$49

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Amanda Johnson-Zetterstrom

Webinar hosted by: Amanda Johnson-Zetterstrom

Writer (Netflix's YOU), Producer (SHORT TERM 12)

Amanda headed up production and development at NYC production shingle, Animal Kingdom before she became a professional writer. There she co-produced Destin Daniel Cretton’s Short Term 12, which won both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at SXSW 2013. She's also been an incremental part of seeing films like David Robert Mitchell's It Follows, Justin Tipping's Kicks, and Joachim Trier's Louder Than Bombs (Jesse Eisenberg) move into production - and actively worked on building Animal Kingdom's development slate. Amanda has also worked with Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love) on his short film Here for Starwood hotels. Prior to working at Animal Kingdom, Amanda was Director of Development at Locomotive, where she worked closely on Jennifer Westfeldt’s Friends With Kids. She has helped shepherd all of these movies to the festival stage, as well as films such as Brian Crano's A Bag Of Hammers and Carrie Preston's That’s What She Said. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Learn directly from Amanda Johnson-Zetterstrom (Short Term 12, Louder Than Bombs, It Follows, Friends With Kids)!

Film festivals. They are one of the best ways to network, market your film, get feedback from judges and audiences, and most importantly, get your work seen. Even better, winning awards at festivals can help you gain major recognition and momentum as a filmmaker. But, if you haven’t submitted a film or attended a festival before, it can be a daunting task to try to get your film into a major festival such as Sundance or South by Southwest.

What festival do you choose? How do you submit your film? What happens once you make it into the festival? How soon should you be booking accommodation? Questions like these often prohibit filmmakers from entering the ever-important film festivals. But fear not – we’re here to give you a breakdown of the process of getting your film into a major festival, what to expect once you’re there, and how to give yourself the best chance of making a good impression.

In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Amanda Johnson-Zetterstrom will guide you through the navigation of getting your film into a major festival. Amanda spent years heading up production and development at NYC production shingle Animal Kingdom. Having co-produced Destin Daniel Cretton’s film Short Term 12, which won both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at SXSW 2013, as well as shepherding over 7 films into major festivals, Amanda knows the ins and outs of what it takes to get into a major film festival and what to do once you’re there.

What You'll Learn

  • Festival strategy to consider before you've shot a frame of your film.
  • Figuring out what festival makes the most sense for your movie.
  • Securing a domestic sales agent.
  • Securing an international sales agent.
  • Securing a publicist.
  • Navigating the festival (booking accommodations and getting to know Park City and Austin like the back of your hand).
  • Who to bring to a festival.
  • What to expect at a festival.
  • Making a splash at the festival.
  • Distribution negotiations: what to expect.
  • What happens after you've premiered at a festival?
  • Recorded, in-depth Q&A with Amanda!

About Your Instructor

Amanda headed up production and development at NYC production shingle, Animal Kingdom before she became a professional writer. There she co-produced Destin Daniel Cretton’s Short Term 12, which won both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at SXSW 2013. She's also been an incremental part of seeing films like David Robert Mitchell's It Follows, Justin Tipping's Kicks, and Joachim Trier's Louder Than Bombs (Jesse Eisenberg) move into production - and actively worked on building Animal Kingdom's development slate. Amanda has also worked with Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love) on his short film Here for Starwood hotels. Prior to working at Animal Kingdom, Amanda was Director of Development at Locomotive, where she worked closely on Jennifer Westfeldt’s Friends With Kids. She has helped shepherd all of these movies to the festival stage, as well as films such as Brian Crano's A Bag Of Hammers and Carrie Preston's That’s What She Said.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Testimonials

"Loved it!" - Jeff N.

"Thank you Amanda! It was great" - Florin M.

"Great info... As I am about to start filming for a doc - and my main goal is getting into festivals." - Terran B.

"Fantastic" - Richard M.

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Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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