The Writers' Room: Let's Talk Pitching!

Hosted by Allen Roughton & Nick Assunto

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Allen Roughton & Nick Assunto

Webinar hosted by: Allen Roughton & Nick Assunto

Stage 32

Allen James Roughton is the Stage 32 Happy Writers Coordinator, a screenwriter, reader and development researcher who has consulted on over 100 projects, scripts, books, comics and films and conducted research on life stories, exposés, professions and locations for major production companies. Nick Assunto is part of the Stage 32 script services team. He was previously a reader for the Austin Film Festival, and this past year was a writer for the 2017 CBS Diversity Sketch Comedy Showcase. Nick also studied improv and sketch comedy at UCB in both New York and Los Angeles from 2007-2016 where he also co-hosted the Sunday show B.Y.O.T. for a time at UCB Sunset's Inner Sanctum. Though writing is his passion, Nick has also dabbled in acting, having been featured on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, an eHarmony commercial directed by Limp Bizkit's Fred Durst (for real), and is infamously known as Tony, the annoying party member from the 'Four Friends' Elder Scrolls spots. Full Bio »

Looking to develop your first pitch? Want to improve the pitch you already have?
Join Stage 32's Nick & Allen and learn what turns a pitch into a request or meeting!

 

We see over 200 projects pitched on Stage 32 each week and review the feedback execs give on all of them. We see the good, the bad, and everything in between. We see what gets read and what gets the dreaded pass. What lands on the top of the pile and what gets buried under everything else. And we see the questions about pitching that get asked week in and week out. So we at Stage 32 have decided to put our experience together in a FREE Webinar on Pitching through Stage 32!

On Monday, March 12th at 1PM Pacific, Stage 32 Writing Service's Allen James Roughton and Nick Assunto will take a deep dive into sharing what they’ve learned over hundreds of pitch sessions and thousands of pitches.

Have a question about pitching you've always wanted to ask us? Join us live and participate in the Q&A!


What You'll Learn:

We'll cover everything that goes into both verbal and written pitches including:

  • Introducing yourself and your relationship to the story.
  • Giving the specs on your project.
  • Constructing a logline that sells your story.
  • Explaining a unique setting, world or rules.
  • Introducing your characters.
  • Telling your story.
  • Outlining your TV series
  • Pitching tips and tricks.

About Your Instructor:

Allen James Roughton is the Stage 32 Happy Writers Coordinator, a screenwriter, reader and development researcher who has consulted on over 100 projects, scripts, books, comics and films and conducted research on life stories, exposés, professions and locations for major production companies.

Nick Assunto is part of the Stage 32 script services team. He was previously a reader for the Austin Film Festival, and this past year was a writer for the 2017 CBS Diversity Sketch Comedy Showcase. Nick also studied improv and sketch comedy at UCB in both New York and Los Angeles from 2007-2016 where he also co-hosted the Sunday show B.Y.O.T. for a time at UCB Sunset's Inner Sanctum. Though writing is his passion, Nick has also dabbled in acting, having been featured on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, an eHarmony commercial directed by Limp Bizkit's Fred Durst (for real), and is infamously known as Tony, the annoying party member from the 'Four Friends' Elder Scrolls spots.


Frequently Asked Questions:

Questions?

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