10 Steps To Keep Your Set Running Smoothly

How To Bring In Your Movie On Time & On Budget
Hosted by Nick Phillips

$49

On Demand Webinar - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

Rating   | Read reviews

Start Learning

Please make sure you use the same email address as the one you use to sign in to Stage 32, otherwise you won't have access to your webinar.
apply Your coupon will be applied after you agree to terms below.

- or -

$49.00
TOTAL PRICE:
Overlay Icon

This Next Level Education webinar has a 92% user satisfaction rate.

Nick Phillips

Webinar hosted by: Nick Phillips

Producer at PBR Streetgang

Nick Phillips has been a producer in the film business for nearly 20 years, in particular the world of genre films. His career started in New York in 1996 as a receptionist, when he began a nine year stint under Bob & Harvey Weinstein, working for Bob's Dimension Films label. While there, he was involved in such franchises as Scream, Halloween, Hellraiser, Mimic, The Crow, and Highlander. He moved to the Dimension LA office in 2003, during which time he appeared on Season 3 of Project Greenlight, which aired on Bravo, helping shepherd the film Feast through production and launching a new franchise in the process. By the time he left Dimension, he had risen to the post of Vice President of Production. In 2005, Nick went to work for Sony Pictures Entertainment in Culver City. He helped create the micro budget genre division Stage 6 Films, under Peter Schlesell. While there he worked on successful sequels to 30 Days of Night and Vacancy, among others. He soon after moved into a position at Sony Screen Gems, working under Clint Culpepper, where he oversaw a diverse slate of films including Straw Dogs, The Roommate, This Christmas and Country Strong, as well as being involved in franchises such as Underworld and Resident Evil. Nick is currently serving as Executive Vice President of Revolver Picture Company, a fully financed independent genre label he co-­founded in 2012 with veteran casting director Kelly Wagner (The Grudge, Hostel). During that time they have produced four films - Haunt with Jacki Weaver and Ione Skye; the award winning Beneath with Jeff Fahey (both released by IFC in 2014) and Devil's Backbone Texas, which Fox Digital Studios released in March 2015. They just wrapped their latest feature, entitled Pet, which stars Dominic Monaghan, Ksenia Solo, and Jennette McCurdy. They also co-­financed and produced the horror reality TV pilot Fight of the Living Dead with Alpine Labs and Blackbox TV. That pilot was picked up by Cinedigm to launch their new genre-­centric network ConTV.com and premiered as a web series in March 2015. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Learn directly from Nick Phillips, studio & independent film producer for nearly 20 years, who has worked with Bob & Harvey Weinstein, Sony Pictures Classics, Revolver Picture Company & more!

You finally have the money to make a film. You’ve chosen a start date, you’ve found your locations. You’ve hired the crew and cast your actors. Now what?

On any movie set, there are two major obstacles: time and money. They can be your friends or they can be your enemies. As a producer, it is your job to make sure that you utilize both in the most effective way possible and not go one second or one cent over. And while you do this, you must walk the tightrope between staying within that budget and schedule while simultaneously producing a film that is creatively satisfying and interesting, with production values that give the film the best chance at succeeding in a highly competitive marketplace.

In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Nick Phillips will walk you through the arduous, challenging, but ultimately rewarding experience of managing a film set. Having worked on sets for almost two decades, Nick has seen the process from every angle and worked with budgets and schedules that range from manageable to ambitious to completely insane.

A working film set is a living, breathing thing, an eco-system with a myriad of moving parts. The days (and nights) are long, exhausting and will prey on your every last nerve. But if you’re armed with the right tools and the proper knowledge, you can sharpen your skill set to the point where producing becomes second nature and actually enjoyable! From location scouting to hiring to shooting days to the wrap party, this webinar will be all encompassing and you will leave confident and ready to manage your set!

What You'll Learn

  • Establish An Honest, Open Relationship With The Director Early On.
    • How to effectively communicate boundaries and set realistic expectations.
    • How to firmly establish your budget and shooting schedule.
  • Decide Where To Shoot And Whether To Use Union Or Non-union Crew As Early As Possible.
    • How this will affect your budget and quality of the crew.
    • How to secure a tax rebate before production starts by choosing the right location.
  • Thoroughly Scout Every Location Before Production.
    • Why this is important for the crew walking through their workflow on the day.
    • How to plan the most effective way to set up and break down your locations in the least amount of time.
  • Form Relationships With All Of The Department Heads.
    • Why talking to them individually is better than as a group.
    • How to walk them through your ideas and plans.
    • Why the DP and gaffer are probably the most important.
    • Why you should never underestimate the importance of a good 1st AD
  • Have The Director Create A Shot List For Each Day's Work.
    • How to stick to it as closely as possible.
    • There will be deviations that occur in the moment due to creative adaptation or situational necessity. Figure out the best way forward which doesn’t affect the schedule.
  • LISTEN!
    • Be on the walkie at all times to hear the communication between the crew.
    • Have the ComTek in your other ear to listen to the actors and directors as they rehearse and adjust between takes.
    • Knowing everything that’s happening at all times makes you a more fully informed producer and more able to make decisions quickly.
  • Create A Timeline For Each Day.
    • How to schedule that day’s work down to the minute, in blocks.
    • Knowing when you need to be moving on to the next scene and by when allows the filmmakers to prioritize takes and setups.
    • How to establish a routine – cast rehearsal, crew rehearsal, setting up the shot, safety meetings, end of day meetings.
  • Establish Trust And Respect With Your Cast.
    • How to communicate that you are there to create something special but you also have a budget and schedule to stay within.
    • How to provide them with as much rehearsal time with the
    • director before production as possible.
    • How to make sure they have appropriate space and accommodations during production.
    • Why good relationships with the cast prevents drama and confrontations when you can least afford them.
  • 2nd Unit Is Your Friend.
    • How to allocate work to allow first unit to focus on their bread and butter work.
    • How this saves time and accrues the extra pieces you need and sometimes gets you shots you didn’t know you needed!
  • Why You Should Always Stay Positive And How To Do It!
    • You’re a leader, the boss. Everyone is looking to you for answers.
    • How to stay calm and take it as it comes. If you’re armed with knowledge and a strong spine, you should have no problems.
    • Fires will come up - how to put them out one by one.
    • Why you shouldn’t ask the crew to do anything you wouldn’t gladly do yourself.
  • Recorded, in-depth Q&A with Nick who has 20 years of producing experience!

About Your Instructor

Nick Phillips has been a producer in the film business for nearly 20 years, in particular the world of genre films. His career started in New York in 1996 as a receptionist, when he began a nine year stint under Bob & Harvey Weinstein, working for Bob's Dimension Films label. While there, he was involved in such franchises as Scream, Halloween, Hellraiser, Mimic, The Crow, and Highlander. He moved to the Dimension LA office in 2003, during which time he appeared on Season 3 of Project Greenlight, which aired on Bravo, helping shepherd the film Feast through production and launching a new franchise in the process. By the time he left Dimension, he had risen to the post of Vice President of Production.

In 2005, Nick went to work for Sony Pictures Entertainment in Culver City. He helped create the micro budget genre division Stage 6 Films, under Peter Schlesell. While there he worked on successful sequels to 30 Days of Night and Vacancy, among others. He soon after moved into a position at Sony Screen Gems, working under Clint Culpepper, where he oversaw a diverse slate of films including Straw Dogs, The Roommate, This Christmas and Country Strong, as well as being involved in franchises such as Underworld and Resident Evil.

Nick is currently serving as Executive Vice President of Revolver Picture Company, a fully financed independent genre label he co-­founded in 2012 with veteran casting director Kelly Wagner (The Grudge, Hostel). During that time they have produced four films - Haunt with Jacki Weaver and Ione Skye; the award winning Beneath with Jeff Fahey (both released by IFC in 2014) and Devil's Backbone Texas, which Fox Digital Studios released in March 2015. They just wrapped their latest feature, entitled Pet, which stars Dominic Monaghan, Ksenia Solo, and Jennette McCurdy. They also co-­financed and produced the horror reality TV pilot Fight of the Living Dead with Alpine Labs and Blackbox TV. That pilot was picked up by Cinedigm to launch their new genre-­centric network ConTV.com and premiered as a web series in March 2015.

FAQs

Q: How do I watch my webinar live?
A: If you received a confirmation that your webinar is on Go to Webinar, you will receive an email from Go to Webinar with further instructions for participating in the live webinar. You can also access your webinar link in your purchase history located under settings in the top right-hand corner of your Stage 32 profile.

If you received a confirmation that your webinar is on Zoom, you will receive a separate email from Zoom with further instructions for participating in the live webinar. Your login link will not be in your Stage 32 profile. If you did not receive your link via Zoom please email support@stage32.com.

Q: How do I watch my webinar on demand?
A: You will be able to watch your webinar on demand as many times as you’d like inside your Stage 32 profile. The recording is processed and posted between 24-48 hours after the webinar concludes. You can follow the instructions below.

YOU MUST HAVE A STAGE 32 PROFILE TO WATCH YOUR VIDEO – STAGE 32 IS FREE TO JOIN If You Already Have a Stage 32 Profile:

  1. Log into your Stage 32 profile
  2. Click "Settings" in the top right-hand corner (gear icon)
  3. Click "Purchase History"
  4. Choose this webinar and click the link to view
If You Do Not Have a Stage 32 Profile:
  1. Go to www.stage32.com
  2. Create a profile using the SAME email address you used to sign up for this webinar. The email addresses must match in order to watch the webinar.
  3. Once you have your profile set up, you can view the webinar by clicking "Settings" in the top right hand corner (gear icon)
  4. Click "Purchase History"
  5. Choose this webinar and click the link to view

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute educational broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32. Your webinar will be taught by a working industry professional with in-depth teaching on a topic. If you are able to attend live you will be able to ask your Stage 32 Educator questions during Q&A.

Q: What are the system requirements to watch my webinar live?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.

If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.9 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer.

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you cannot attend a live webinar or purchase an on demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to re-watch?
A: Yes! Like all Stage 32 education, after the purchase of a live or on demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the recording.

Q: How do I get a copy of the handouts provided?
A: If the webinar you take included handouts you can find them as downloads underneath your on demand video. You must be logged into your Stage 32 profile to view the video and get the handouts by clicking settings in the top right hand corner, then clicking purchase history.

Q: What if I need accessibility and accommodations?
A: Email support@stage32.com to request accommodations.

Thanks for your loyalty to Stage 32 Education. We value having you in the Stage 32 community.

If you have any further questions, we are always happy to help. Please contact Stage 32 support at support@stage32.com.

Testimonials

Nick was fantastically generous with his information, experience and time. I got more practical information out of these 90 min than any film book. Please have him on again.” – Annelise P.

Man, you were fantastic! I love your depth of knowledge and you dedication to the genre. Both really came through in your presentation. I benefited hugely from you experience and presentation. Thanks for making yourself available!” – Larry W.

Awesome. Very educational. Thank you for your time.” – Joseph O.

It's obvious Nick is full of experience and is a great resource.” – Clifford D.

Seminar was mapped out well for different levels of attendee knowledge + good mix of examples from his own films mixed with other classics.” - Roland H.

Please do more webinars, I learned a lot and like your energy!” – Dominika P.

Very well done. Covered the material very well.” – Glenn C.

Relevant Tags

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Other education that may be of interest to you:

How to Produce & Shoot a Successful Low Budget Horror Film

Low budget horror films have never been hotter or more in demand. Last year, The Hollywood Reporter stated that the horror genre was saving the film business and that low budget horror was helping to lead the charge. More and more companies are looking to follow the Blumhouse model of making horror films on the cheap and then raking it in at the box office and VOD. Even the streaming platforms have jumped in with both feet. But make no mistake, just because many of these production companies and filmmakers are keeping their costs down, they are not skimping on quality. Quite the opposite in fact. Horror film aficionados demand great stories, memorable characters and scares that are earned. They want fresh ideas, a unique vision, and an experience they can return to again and again. To stand out from the crowd, you need to be prepared not only to find or produce great material, but to understand how to navigate the landscape. More people produce and shoot horror than just about any other genre. And in such a crowded field, it can be hard to stand out. Go to any film market or horror trade show and you are instantly inundated with posters for dozens if not hundreds of horror features, short films, television shows and digital content looking for a home. After a while, everything seems to look the same. But there is a way to break out of that crowded field and assure that your work gets seen, bought, distributed and/or screened. And we have just the guy to show you how to get it done. Nick Phillips knows horror. In his 20 years in the business, Nick has worked, developed and produced films for Miramax and Sony Screen Gems. In 2012, Nick co-founded his own production company specializing in genre films, the Revolver Picture Company. Just some of the films Nick has worked on include Scream, Halloween, Hellraiser, the Crow, Vacancy, Feast and The Roommate. Now, exclusively for Stage 32, Nick will share his knowledge on how to create terrifying films at not-so-terrifying costs. Films the industry wants to have a piece of and horror fans won't be able to get enough of. Nick will start by teaching you one of the most common failings of producers and filmmakers within the horror space, namely what you should look for in a horror script. From there, he will talk development and the production process during this all important period of the project's evolution. Nick will show you how to stretch your budget dollar, by minimizing locations (but maximizing how you use them), making the right hires, keeping the shoot moving and staying on schedule. He will teach you his tricks on working with actors during the most intense scenes and keeping them motivated. Speaking of actors, he will discuss whether name talent matters or whether choosing the best actor for the part is a better approach.  He will show you how to get the best production value throughout the film. And everyone knows, a great horror movie demands a sequel! Nick will show you how to set yourself up so that your project is franchise ready.   This is a fully comprehensive overview of how to immerse yourself in the horror genre as a producer and/or filmmaker.   "I have no desire to work in any other genre outside of horror. I've been frustrated that my vision always seems to be too expensive for the money I have available. Thank you, Nick, for showing me the path to seeing my vision through while keeping my costs down. I'm inspired again!" Matt H.   "There is nothing scary about this webinar. It's fantastic." Devon M.   "Man, was this eye opening. I have seen the light and now know how to keep my costs in check. Let the blood flow!" - Francisco D.   "My all female slasher grindhouse project is back on my production slate thanks to you, Nick. I don't know how that makes you feel, but I feel fantastic!" - Marissa G.

Documentary Filmmaking: Finding the Story from Your Footage

Documentary filmmaking is a very different game than narrative filmmaking, as any documentarian can tell you. Perhaps the most important difference between the two is that narrative filmmaking follows a script. The story is determined and developed before production begins. This is not the case with documentaries—it can’t be. Documentaries capture real life which is anything but predetermined. As a result the documentary filmmaking process is flipped and the story is crafted after production. Therefore perhaps the most important but least talked about stage of documentary filmmaking is the editing. Not the technical craft of editing, but storytelling, specifically finding and crafting the story from your footage. This doesn’t just make or break your documentary; it is your documentary. Yet this process of finding the story can be incredibly hard since it’s is often vastly different from the story in your head. But mastering this skill is the key to being a great documentary filmmaker and something that’s entirely within your grasp. Most documentary filmmakers reach a stage in putting together their film where they believe they’re “too close to the footage” and “need fresh eyes.” At this point, they hope an outsider will help solve the problems arising in their edit. On the contrary, this is stage where the filmmaker needs to get closer to the footage and ask themselves some very big questions. More than the interviews, more than shooting footage, more than even the assembly edit, this is the moment that makes a documentary great; it’s not the time to tap out. Knowing what makes a good documentary story, which big questions to ask, and how to get out of tough narrative jams can make all the difference in putting together your project. Eric Daniel Metzgar is an Emmy Award-winning filmmaker and the producer and editor of Hulu's documentary CRIME + PUNISHMENT, which won an Emmy and Sundance Film Festival's Grand Jury Prize. A two-time Sundance Documentary Lab Fellow, Eric has extensive experience directing, producing, writing, and editing award-winning documentary films. He directed, shot and edited REPORTER, which premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, aired on HBO, and was nominated for an Emmy Award. He also directed, shot and edited LIFE.SUPPORT.MUSIC., which aired on PBS’s long-running documentary series POV, and THE CHANCES OF THE WORLD CHANGING, which also aired on POV and was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award. Eric also edited GIVE UP TOMORROW and ALMOST SUNRISE, which were both nominated for Emmys and also aired on POV. Through his storied and heavily awarded history, Eric has positioned himself as a practiced and highly sought after editor and documentarian. He’s prepared to share what he knows with the Stage 32 community. Eric will teach you invaluable strategies to help you move through the inevitable difficult stages of your documentary editing journey and to stay on track when the going gets tough and all seems lost. He will begin by going over what makes a good documentary story in general, including beginnings, middles, and ends, arcs, stakes, and “releasing power”. He’ll then discuss how best to approach your own footage and determining if you have a story. He’ll explain differentiating between the footage and the story in your head, how to craft an outline, and create a reckoning with beats. He will also teach you what selects are and why they can make all the difference. Next Eric will give you tips on how to approach the initial assembly edit, where to start, how to stay motivated, how to avoid “the music trap” and the best way to start linking your scenes together. Then he will delve into the real editing after the assembly is completed. He’ll discuss rearranging, re-cutting, and deleting, how to fix the scenes that aren’t working and how to know when to kill your darlings. He will also give you tips on revisiting raw footage later on in the process and what to do when you hit those inevitable but painful roadblocks. Eric will focus on the two hardest parts of a documentary—beginnings and endings, and strategies to make them successful. Next Eric will go into strategies of how to be objective of your own project in order to figure out why it sucks. He will spend time giving tips and inspiration for what to do when you hit that dreaded brick wall and how to stay on track and hold on to your purpose when things get difficult. He’ll talk about getting others’ opinions and what you need to do to allow your film to be good, how to take it from good to great, shifting from the content to the form, fine tuning, working with the film as a whole, and how best to address lingering doubts. There’s nothing harder than editing a great documentary, but you will leave this webinar with a better understanding of how to be successful and a collection of strategies to help you navigate your way through.   Praise for Eric's Stage 32 Webinar   "This webinar was truly insightful. Very down to earth and straightforward with information. I learned more with Eric in a half-hour than 1 year at a university." -Michelle A.   "Fantastic webinar! Eric shared valuable information in such an engaging way...I was so relaxed even though I was feverishly taking notes. : ) He was definitely inspiring. I'm anxious to watch it again!" -Marli W.   "Amazing session with Eric. He has saved me months of prep on my docs just on the tips I got today. No more paper edits for me." - Genevieve S.   "What an amazingly insightful, helpful presentation! Eric's evident passion for documentary film and practical guidance left me excited to dig into my project." -Alexis S.   "So helpful. Exactly what I needed during this time in my careers and profession." -Alexandra K.  

Understanding and Working With the Guilds & Unions - A Comprehensive Guide

Putting together a project can be complicated. The amount of information to sift through, from guild requirements and guidelines to union rules and even whether to go union or non-union can be overwhelming, confusing and intimidating. For filmmakers, producers and other creatives looking to control their own content, navigating the guilds and the unions can be so daunting, it pushes back production and/or any forward momentum your project might have. Allow us to help demystify, simplify the guilds and unions landscape and get you on your way to doing what you want to most, making your film, TV or digital project.   With independent productions on the rise, it's more important than ever to know how to handle your budget and schedule accordingly, and that begins with understanding which guilds you'll be working with and how to deal with their rules and regulations. It also means understanding the ins and outs of the unions. Buttoning up all of these important variables early will assure that nothing falls through the cracks, your set runs smoothly, and there are no unpleasant surprises once you hit the distribution and collection phases of your project.   Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more. With over three decades of experience, Rosi has worked internationally with production companies from US, Europe, Russia and Latin America. Rosi began as a casting director 32 years ago in Puerto Rico working for director Marcos Zurinaga at Zaga Films where she became one of the top casting directors in the Island. After working as such for a few years, she wanted to expand her horizons in production moving on to work with the most important TV producer in the Island, Gabriel Suau, in Telemundo-Puerto Rico, where she worked for several years in various TV shows and telenovelas.   Rosi will begin by giving you a complete, yet simplified look at the guilds and unions. She will pull back the curtain and discuss the ins and outs and pros and cons of working with the labor organizations. Rosi will go over the differences between unions and guilds and help you decide if you should go union or non-union for your project. You will learn the organizations for above the line - WGAW, WGAE, DGA, SAG/AFTRA and PGA, below the line - IATSE, Teamsters and NLRB, as well as other organizations that work closely with them - ATA, AMPTP, MPAA, ASCAP, CSATF, MPSE and more. In addition you'll learn how to become a member of a union or how to become a signatory production.          "Rosi, your 30 years of experience shined through today. You broke down this so it's easily understandable and now I know that my production this year will be union!" - Rachel G.     "Awesome explanations of the unions, guilds and organizations. Very comprehensive." - Paul F.     "You made this so easy to understand. Thanks Rosi!" - Brandon C.      "Putting together my first film as a producer almost made my jump off a cliff. I wish I would have seen this first! What a world of difference it would have made. Thank you, Rosi!" -Marlene D.

6 Pitfalls To Avoid When Working With Tax Incentives

As the Vice President of Three Point Capital, Viviana Zarragoitia is one of the most prolific financiers who routinely lend on tax incentives, both domestically and internationally, on independent films. She is aware of the rules and regulations of tax incentives in many jurisdictions, and have spoken on numerous panels about tax credits. In this exclusive webinar, Viviana will be teaching what producers should be aware of when working with tax incentives. Although there are minor details that change within each state/country, there are some overall issues that come up in each jurisdiction that producers should be aware of when taking advantage of tax incentives for their film/TV project. These include, but are not limited to, things such as: corporate structure of the company applying for the tax incentive, making sure that costs in-state are qualified spend, working with tax incentive offices during pre-production, production and post-production, submitting final costs in a timely fashion, working with production accountants/CPAs on tracking qualified spend, working with lenders and filing tax returns to claim the incentives.

How to Get Staffed as a Comedy TV Writer for a Streamer like Netflix, Amazon or Hulu

People are glued to streaming platforms more than ever and desperate for a show to make them laugh. Everyone who's read your script knows you're funny. Why can't that show be yours? We're giving you the expert tools to get in the room and make this the year you launch your television comedy career. Do you dream of your joke being the next viral meme? Or your show being the next awards-sweeping TED LASSO? Are you unsure how to navigate comedy audiences in a world where tastes and platforms are rapidly changing? No matter what your style or skill set, there's an audience out there for you. But you won't find them until you put yourself out there with the right tools to get staffed or sell your brilliant comedy. Every day there's a new streamer with its own brand and audience to cater to. From TED LASSO to PEN15 to SPACE FORCE, there have never been so many opportunities available. But while making someone laugh gets you a career, it takes more to get you in the door, and these digital players aren't following the rules of traditional networks. In this exclusive Stage 32 webinar, you'll learn the ins and outs of streaming writers' room styles and how to be effective within them so that your jokes get airplay. You'll understand how to write stories that will thrill a showrunner and get you staffed in a room. You'll have the chance to analyze your pilot to consider where it fits in the marketplace, how to view it as though you're the executive, and determine how to strengthen your concept so that it's ready to sell. You'll discover the differences between platforms, budgets, schedules, audiences, and development needs, and more. Most importantly, you'll learn how to get your work into the right hands and snag that comedy gig at a top streaming platform. Taking you through the state of streamer staffing season and pilot selling is literary and talent manager Spencer Robinson of Art/Work Entertainment. With over 20 years of experience, Spencer has had clients in films from directors Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, Clint Eastwood, Gore Verbinski, and more. His clients have worked on projects from Netflix, The CW, Cinemax, CBS, NBC, FX, Starz, Nickelodeon, EPIX, and TBS, to name a few. Using his extensive experience helping writers get staffed and sell their pilots, Spencer teaches you the do's and don't of writing for streamers vs. network and how to tailor your script to make the best impression on executives at the biggest streamers in town. He lays out how streamers differ from the formatting to structure and specifically analyzes what you should consider before tackling your pilot. Spencer also dives into staffing and sales, and what approach is best for you, with the opportunity to ask Spencer any questions about yourself and your comedy career pilot during the Q & A. He'll also debunk common misconceptions about selling a comedy series in today's market and how you can use IP to sell your show. Whether you have the next great comedy series are ready to land a spot in a streaming room, this webinar ensures you walk away prepared for success.     Spencer was awesome! Super informative and detail-driven - providing great insights. Packed so much into a short amount of time which I'm super grateful for! -Eric C.  

Creating Your Film's Release Strategy

Learn directly from Jon Reiss, a distribution and marketing specialist who's worked with Paramount Pictures, Screen Australia, Film Independent, and is the year-round distribution and marketing lab leader at the IFP Filmmaker Labs. Filmmakers all over the world are confronted with a changing distribution landscape for their work – how are they to approach the myriad of options whether traditional or emerging? No matter how you release your film filmmakers must be grounded in what their goals are and knowing how to engage their audience. This webinar will cover the essentials that all filmmakers need to consider before marketing and distributing their film: goals and audience. We will first examine the five main goals possible for a films release followed by three steps of the Think Outside the Box Office (TOTBO) audience engagement process: identification, connection, value.

register for stage 32 Register / Log In