Q&A with a Screenwriting Legend - Jim Uhls (Fight Club, Jumper, Shane Black's The Destroyer, Leviathan)

Hosted by Jim Uhls

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Jim Uhls

Webinar hosted by: Jim Uhls

Screenwriter, FIGHT CLUB, JUMPER, THE DESTROYER

Jim Uhls is the screenwriter behind FIGHT CLUB (directed by David Fincher, starring Brad Pitt and Edward Norton, based off of the critically acclaimed Chuck Palahniuk novel) as well as the Doug Liman film JUMPER, which has grossed over $222 million worldwide. Next up, Jim is the screenwriter for the new Shane Black film, THE DESTROYER, and THE LEVIATHAN at 20th Century FOX. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

The first rule of a Q&A with Jim Uhls is you DO talk about a Q&A with Jim Uhls.

Join Stage 32's Founder Richard "RB" Botto as he talks with legendary scribe Jim Uhls, screenwriter of the Academy Award nominated film FIGHT CLUB, JUMPER, and the upcoming Shane Black film THE DESTROYER and 20th Century FOX's THE LEVIATHAN.

Afterwards we'll open it up for questions from you, the Stage 32 community. Now, no matter where you live in the world you can tune in and ask Jim questions online exclusively through Stage 32!

About Your Instructor

Jim Uhls is the screenwriter behind FIGHT CLUB (directed by David Fincher, starring Brad Pitt and Edward Norton, based off of the critically acclaimed Chuck Palahniuk novel) as well as the Doug Liman film JUMPER, which has grossed over $222 million worldwide. Next up, Jim is the screenwriter for the new Shane Black film, THE DESTROYER, and THE LEVIATHAN at 20th Century FOX.

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A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

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If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • I'm so excited to join the FREE webinar Q&A with legendary screenwriter Jim Uhls via STAGE 32 on May 22nd! The knowledge gained will be insurmountable!

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