Screenwriting Fellowship Bio & Essay Workshop

Hosted by Tawnya Bhattacharya

$49

On Demand Webinar - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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Tawnya Bhattacharya

Webinar hosted by: Tawnya Bhattacharya

TV Writer & Script Anatomy and Disney/ABC Writing Workshop Teacher

Tawnya Bhattacharya is a writer, writing instructor, and founder of Script Anatomy, a writing school that helps television writers reach their writing goals and elevate their craft through classes, workshops and private consultations. Bhattacharya’s teaching career began at Writers Boot Camp from 2005 – 2008. Having experienced gaps in continuing education for screenwriters as both a student and a teacher, Tawnya found she had both the craft to be able to quickly discern what was missing and the rhetoric to articulate it to students, so she created Script Anatomy — a unique curriculum to give writers practical development, writing and rewriting tools based on her own process. She launched Script Anatomy in 2011. Uniquely, Bhattacharya brings both a ten-year teaching background and professional writing experience to Script Anatomy’s curriculum. She most recently has guest-taught workshops with ISA (International Screenwriters Association) and the Disney | ABC Writing Program and writes a column in Script Magazine called “Your TV Guide.“ Currently a Writer/Producer on Freeform’s “Famous in Love,” Tawnya has also written on NBC’s The Night Shift, TNT’sPerception, The Client List at Lifetime and on USA’s Fairly Legal, with her writing partner, Ali Laventhol. Repped by ICM Partners, Heroes and Villains Entertainment and Morris Yorn, they are former NBC Writers on the Verge fellows, winning one of 8 spots out of 1200 applicants. The team also made semi-finalists for the ABC Disney Fellowship before getting a job that took them out of the running, and have developed projects with Battle Plan, Fresh Ink, Cinestar and Lionsgate. Tawnya was also a FOX Writer’s Intensive fellow (FOX optioned her semi-autobiographical pilot). With Script Anatomy, Bhattacharya has helped hundreds of writers succeed. Some have won contests, festivals, and fellowships, others secured representation, or been hired for assignments. Others still have graduated from Script Anatomy to go onto their first staff jobs on network and cable shows, even selling TV pilots, screenplays, and novels as a result. Full Bio »

This special fellowship season workshop will focus on the architecture of the dreaded fellowship submission materials! 

  

 
"In this competition driven town, Tawnya Bhattacharya is a breath of fresh air. She's smart, funny and extremely generous with her knowledge. I walked out of the workshop knowing exactly how to approach my Fellowship essays and bios - and I look forward to doing them. She made what I've previously viewed as a horrendous chore seem fun. If you haven't checked out a class, you should." - Lisanne Sartor (more testimonials below!)
 

Your host, Tawnya Bhattacharya, an alumna of both NBC Writers on the Verge and the FOX Writers Intensive, is currently a writer/producer on Freeform's "Famous in Love," and has also written on TNT's “Perception," NBC's "The Night Shift, Lifetime's "The Client List," and "Fairly Legal" for USA with her writing partner, Ali Laventhol. Tawnya has also taught for the Disney|ABC Writing Program for the past two years. She is repped by ICM Partners, Heroes and Villains Entertainment and Morris Yorn.

Over the years Tawyna has taught hundreds of writers on how to put together successful, winning bios & essays. In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Tawnya will deconstruct successful fellowship bios & essays, analyze why they work, and help you articulate the symbiotic relationship between your life story and your brand as a writer in 500 words or less. Here's just some of the things we’ll cover:

  • How your bios and essays serve your career, not just fellowships.
  • What the program heads have to say about bios and essays.
  • How you can mine Your Unique Story and stand out.
  • Dos and Don’ts.
  • Examples from Winning Fellowship Candidates.
  • Your Bio & Essay Checklist… and more!
  • Q&A

PLUS! You will get handouts:

  • Mining your personal story Worksheet
  • Bio Essay Statement of Purpose Checklist
  • Actual examples of Fellowship winners essays & bios

Bhattacharya’s company, Script Anatomy is a TV writing school taught solely by working TV writers and has launched the careers of many writers. Alum have been in every single Fellowship Program (including 5 in 2016/2017) and have sold pilots and staffed on shows such as American Crime, The Handmaid’s Tale, Chicago Justice, The Blacklist, Blindspot, The 100 and more… For more info about Script Anatomy, visit www.scriptanatomy.com

 

 


About Your Instructor:

Tawnya Bhattacharya is a writer, writing instructor, and founder of Script Anatomy, a writing school that helps television writers reach their writing goals and elevate their craft through classes, workshops and private consultations.

Bhattacharya’s teaching career began at Writers Boot Camp from 2005 – 2008. Having experienced gaps in continuing education for screenwriters as both a student and a teacher, Tawnya found she had both the craft to be able to quickly discern what was missing and the rhetoric to articulate it to students, so she created Script Anatomy — a unique curriculum to give writers practical development, writing and rewriting tools based on her own process. She launched Script Anatomy in 2011. Uniquely, Bhattacharya brings both a ten-year teaching background and professional writing experience to Script Anatomy’s curriculum. She most recently has guest-taught workshops with ISA (International Screenwriters Association) and the Disney | ABC Writing Program and writes a column in Script Magazine called “Your TV Guide. Currently a Writer/Producer on Freeform’s “Famous in Love,” Tawnya has also written on NBC’s The Night Shift, TNT’sPerception, The Client List at Lifetime and on USA’s Fairly Legal, with her writing partner, Ali Laventhol. Repped by ICM Partners, Heroes and Villains Entertainment and Morris Yorn, they are former NBC Writers on the Verge fellows, winning one of 8 spots out of 1200 applicants. The team also made semi-finalists for the ABC Disney Fellowship before getting a job that took them out of the running, and have developed projects with Battle Plan, Fresh Ink, Cinestar and Lionsgate. Tawnya was also a FOX Writer’s Intensive fellow (FOX optioned her semi-autobiographical pilot).

With Script Anatomy, Bhattacharya has helped hundreds of writers succeed. Some have won contests, festivals, and fellowships, others secured representation, or been hired for assignments. Others still have graduated from Script Anatomy to go onto their first staff jobs on network and cable shows, even selling TV pilots, screenplays, and novels as a result.


Frequently Asked Questions:


Testimonials:

"I found it to be super helpful! Specifically, really pulling out something personal to you, your personal logline-- and creating a story around one specific instance-- this was such an instrumental concept to creating my bio and I really am glad I took the class. I hadn't thought of it that way at all." - L.A. Townsley
 
"In this competition driven town, Tawnya Bhattacharya is a breath of fresh air. She's smart, funny and extremely generous with her knowledge. I walked out of the workshop knowing exactly how to approach my Fellowship essays and bios - and I look forward to doing them. She made what I've previously viewed as a horrendous chore seem fun. And the exercise we did in class - writing our personal loglines - was incredibly helpful. I look forward to taking more classes at Script Anatomy. If you haven't checked out a class, you should." - Lisanne Sartor
 
"Through the workshop, I realized I was approaching fellowship essays and bios the wrong way. Tawnya showed us the tools for effectively finding our own personal stories. It was especially beneficial to hear the insights from current and past fellowship recipients. If you want to craft an essay that knocks it out of the park, I’d highly recommend this workshop." - Gene Augusto
 
"The Fellowship Bio & Essay Workshop was absolutely phenomenal. It could have very easily have been just the information session it started with, but the fact that it also included winning examples, a chance for everyone in the workshop to share a bio fact for feedback, live feedback on student essay drafts AND a panel with fellowship participants...I couldn't have asked for more! Thank you so much for sharing all your knowledge with us." - Jessica Combs
 
"When a class or workshop specifically meets a need, it is a marriage made in heaven. That's what the essay/bio workshop was for me. Timing was perfect and the key critical information shared was specific and enlightening. Several points were revealed while others were refreshed! Thank you Tawnya so much, you we're outstanding!" -Toni Staton Harris

Questions?

 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • Great class. I'm a script anatomy alumni and I'm glad Stage 32 offered the class online since I haven't been able to make it in person. THANK YOU!

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