How to Create an "Investor Kit" to Raise Financing for Your Film or Project

Hosted by Kevin Christoffersen

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Kevin Christoffersen

Webinar hosted by: Kevin Christoffersen

Executive Producer at Film Education & Development

Kevin Christoffersen has been producing multi-media content internationally for over two decades across four continents while living in five countries. He is working as a Development Executive, Producer, Writer and consulting with the new technology platform Movie Rights Exchange that is changing the way films are being distributed.Current projects include his co-written feature, FALLING UP with Stephanie Drapeau, Dallas Brennan’s DECEPTION ROAD, a new Hal Hartley feature in development and REAR VIEW MIRRORS being casted by Kerry Barden. On the education side, Kevin has guest lectured at NYU, teaches workshop classes with the IFP, Art of Brooklyn Film Festival, Filmshop and moderated a producers panel at the Hunter Mountain Film Festival. He then works with students on creating their packages throughout the A to Z Development process.While based in Geneva, Switzerland for seven years, Kevin managed large-scale live event tv broadcasts for Fortune 500 companies and United Nations agencies including the annual World Economic Forum Davos conference. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

It's no secret that raising funds for a film is a difficult proposition. Most people who repeatedly invest in the film industry have no shortage of projects from which to choose to place their money. They also have a particular set of standards and requirements that need to be met before they write a check. Even more casual investors in film who go in with lowered expectations still will want to see that you have the knowledge, discipline and understanding on how to handle and protect their money and put them in the best position for a return. The fact of the matter is that you could have the most attractive project with a highly marketable and commercial screenplay and fantastic talent interested in attaching, but if you can't deliver on the important details, know how to answer the toughest questions, and show that you have the savvy to withstand the scrutiny associated with putting together a film financing deal, your potential investment target will be on to the next pitch without a blink.

There is no straight answer on how to pitch an investor. Some will tell you that without a pitch deck, you have no shot. Others will tell you that 99% of the time a pitch deck is just a pretty, overblown document designed to dazzle and amazing, but with very little substantiative information. Regardless of the approach, there is one fact that is undeniable: you need to know every angle on how a film can come together and be able to show clearly and concisely a path to how your investor is going to recoup their money and potentially make a profit. To do that, you need to be able to put together an investor kit, first for yourself, and then as something you can tailor to your investor. There's no need to be intimidated by this. Once you understand the various facets of film investing, the rest will fall into place quite naturally. And we're here to help you do just that.

Kevin Christoffersen has been producing multi-media content internationally for over two decades across four continents while living in five countries. Currently, Kevin is working as a development executive, producer, writer and consulting with the technology platform Movie Rights Exchange which is changing the way films are being distributed. Kevin's current projects include his co-written feature, Falling Up with Stephanie Drapeau, Dallas Brennan’s Deception Road, a new Hal Hartley feature in development and Rear View Windows being casted by Kerry Barden. Kevin has guest lectured at NYU, teaches workshop classes with the IFP, Art of Brooklyn Film Festival, Filmshop and moderated a producers panel at the Hunter Mountain Film Festival. He then works with students on creating their packages throughout the A to Z Development process.

Kevin will be teaching about the step by step process required throughout the development financing stage of your feature film project to create your "Investor Kit". This includes all of the elements from business plans to budgets, proof of concept videos, retaining production counsel and a casting director. Kevin will show you the all important skill of bringing packaging elements to your project, something so very important in this day and age. He will tell you how to handle the common issue of securing "First-in money" and how to navigate talent retainer fees. He will talk co-production agreements, also a valuable thing when putting together a film. He will teach you about distribution agreements, tax credit loans and pre-sales estimates. Kevin will even teach you how to source your investors and how to build a powerful team so you can wear limited hats and divide and conquer.

 

Praise for Kevin

 

"Took the intimidation and fear of approaching investors by presenting clear facts and strategies that make perfect sense."

- Michael M.

 

"I've read complex and dense books on this subject that have taken me months to get through and I learned more in 2 hours with Kevin. Brilliant material."

- Cheryl Lee K.

 

"This one was off the charts."

- Sammie P.

 

"This removed so many questions. So many. I feel as if the clouds have parted. This IS possible. Thank you, Kevin."

- Marty K.

 

What You'll Learn

  • Film Financing
  • Package Elements
  • Investment Sourcing
  • Investment through Limited Liability Units of Interest (Membership Interests) to Accredited Investors through Regulation D of the SEC
  • Tax Credit Loans
  • First-In Money
  • Talent Retainer Fees (Schedule F versus Triple Scale)
  • Pre-Sales Estimates
  • Co-Production Agreements
  • Proof of Concepts (Mood Reel / Short Film) Festival Tour
  • Marketing Materials - Examples of Look Books
  • Distribution Agreements (Exclusive / Non-Exclusive)
  • Mentoring Producer
  • Executive Producer 
  • Divide & Conquer (wear limited hats) between being Writer / Director / Producer
  • Q&A with Kevin

 

About Your Instructor

Kevin Christoffersen has been producing multi-media content internationally for over two decades across four continents while living in five countries.

He is working as a Development Executive, Producer, Writer and consulting with the new technology platform Movie Rights Exchange that is changing the way films are being distributed.

Current projects include his co-written feature, FALLING UP with Stephanie Drapeau, Dallas Brennan’s DECEPTION ROAD, a new Hal Hartley feature in development and REAR VIEW MIRRORS being casted by Kerry Barden.

On the education side, Kevin has guest lectured at NYU, teaches workshop classes with the IFP, Art of Brooklyn Film Festival, Filmshop and moderated a producers panel at the Hunter Mountain Film Festival. He then works with students on creating their packages throughout the A to Z Development process.

While based in Geneva, Switzerland for seven years, Kevin managed large-scale live event tv broadcasts for Fortune 500 companies and United Nations agencies including the annual World Economic Forum Davos conference.

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