The State of Film Festivals in the Age of COVID-19 - FREE Q&A and Discussion

Hosted by Top Film Festival Directors, Programmers and Experts

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Top Film Festival Directors, Programmers and Experts

Webinar hosted by: Top Film Festival Directors, Programmers and Experts

Austin Film Festival, Hollyshorts Film Festival, Raindance Film Festival, Tribeca Film Festival, and Stage 32

Kimberley Browning, Hollywood Shorts Film Festival & Tribeca Film Festival Kimberley Browning is a filmmaker and film festival professional based in Los Angeles. She is the founder and festival director of Hollywood Shorts, a short film screening series and emerging filmmakers program, currently in it’s 22nd year. Kimberley serves as an Associate Short Film Programmer at the Tribeca Film Festival, and formerly was a short film Programmer for the Los Angeles Film Festival and Guadalajara International Film Festival Los Angeles. She is the Executive Producer of HBO ACCESS Directors Fellowship, the network's program developing and launching underrepresented voices into episodic television.   Daniel Sol, Hollyshorts Film Festival Daniel Sol is the co-founder and co-director of the Oscar-qualifying Hollyshorts Film Festival and formerly a theatrical sales executive for Lionsgate. In 2006, he realized that young filmmakers had very little access to industry professionals, and few options for screening their films. And thus, the HollyShorts Film Festival was born. Now in its 13th year, HollyShorts has quickly become the most influential short film festival in Los Angeles, with Daniel guiding it as Festival Director and lead programmer for the festival. Daniel is also the co founder of the premium Roku, Amazon Fire TV, and Apple TV content channel BITPIX (www.bitpixtv.com).   Elliot Grove, Raindance Film Festival Elliot Grove founded Raindance Film Festival in 1993, the British Independent Film Awards in 1998, and Raindance.TV in 2007. He has produced over 150 short films, and 5 feature films. His first feature film, TABLE 5 was shot on 35mm and completed for a total of £278.38. He teaches writers and producers in the UK, Europe. Japan and America. He hasalso written three books which have become industry standards: RAINDANCE WRITERS LAB 2nd Edition (Focal Press 2008), RAINDANCE PRODUCERS LAB (Focal Press 2004) and 130 PROJECTS TO GET YOU INTO FILMMAKING (Barrons 2009). Open University awarded Elliot and Honourary Doctorate for services to film education in 2009.   Casey Baron, Austin Film Festival: Born and raised in the small island of Dominica located in the West Indies, Casey Baron has been a part of the Austin Film Festival family for five years running; starting off as an intern before climbing the ladder to become the festival’s Shorts Programmer for its 25th anniversary. Casey now serves as AFF's Senior Film Program Director, where he puts together and oversees the festival's entire film slate and pushes forward the festival's mission of championing storytellers. When he’s not racing to find captivating stories, Casey spends his spare time watching basketball and soccer, listening to music, and playing with his dog Niobe.   Amanda Toney, Stage 32 Amanda Toney has served as the Managing Director of Stage 32 since 2013 where she oversees operations and business development for the global business. She has curated over 1,000 hours of online education created exclusively for Stage 32, and works with hundreds of entertainment industry executives from around the world to serve as educators and mentors. She has spearheaded partnerships with such prestigious organizations as the Cannes Film Festival Marché du Film, American Film Market, SXSW, Austin Film Festival, Raindance Film Festival, Hollyshorts Film Festival, PGA, WGA and DGA. Amanda also manages Stage 32's Screenings platform, which gives films accepted at other festivals a place to screen for industry professionals. Outside of Stage 32, Amanda is a film producer best known for WHAT LIES AHEAD starring Rumer Willis and Emma Dumont and METAPHORMS, a Hungarian production which premiered at the Raindance Film Festival. She recently sold an unscripted TV show to a major US network.   Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every industry in the world, but perhaps none as harshly as that of live events. Whether it’s concerts, theaters, conferences, conventions, or anything in between, organizations built around bringing people together are scrambling to adapt in order to survive and continue their missions. Nowhere is this more true or evident than with film festivals.

Film fests big and small have been grappling with large existential issues since the outbreak and have needed to find large scale and innovative changes to continue sharing films and championing artists in a now virtual setting. The landscape of film festivals has no doubt changed, but what exactly does this change look like and how permanent will this move to virtual be? How can festivals stay afloat and how should filmmakers be using festivals in this new era?

 

In another FREE Stage 32 COVID-19 webinar, directors and programmers from Tribeca, Hollyshorts, Raindance, and Austin Film Festivals, as well as Stage 32’s very own Managing Director Amanda Toney will come together for an exclusive Q&A session where they’ll answer questions from the Stage 32 community about the state of film festivals and where they believe things are headed. They’ll address platforms and solutions available to film festivals (including Stage 32’s Screenings platform!), and will give their thoughts and advice to filmmakers on how to consider, approach and submit to festivals in this new virtual era. Bring your questions and prepare for a direct, upfront, and honest discussion.

About Your Instructor

Film Festival Directors Programmers and Experts

Kimberley Browning, Hollywood Shorts Film Festival & Tribeca Film Festival

Kimberley Browning is a filmmaker and film festival professional based in Los Angeles. She is the founder and festival director of Hollywood Shorts, a short film screening series and emerging filmmakers program, currently in it’s 22nd year. Kimberley serves as an Associate Short Film Programmer at the Tribeca Film Festival, and formerly was a short film Programmer for the Los Angeles Film Festival and Guadalajara International Film Festival Los Angeles. She is the Executive Producer of HBO ACCESS Directors Fellowship, the network's program developing and launching underrepresented voices into episodic television.

 

Film Festival Directors Programmers and Experts

Daniel Sol, Hollyshorts Film Festival

Daniel Sol is the co-founder and co-director of the Oscar-qualifying Hollyshorts Film Festival and formerly a theatrical sales executive for Lionsgate. In 2006, he realized that young filmmakers had very little access to industry professionals, and few options for screening their films. And thus, the HollyShorts Film Festival was born. Now in its 13th year, HollyShorts has quickly become the most influential short film festival in Los Angeles, with Daniel guiding it as Festival Director and lead programmer for the festival. Daniel is also the co founder of the premium Roku, Amazon Fire TV, and Apple TV content channel BITPIX (www.bitpixtv.com).

 

Film Festival Directors Programmers and Experts

Elliot Grove, Raindance Film Festival

Elliot Grove founded Raindance Film Festival in 1993, the British Independent Film Awards in 1998, and Raindance.TV in 2007. He has produced over 150 short films, and 5 feature films. His first feature film, TABLE 5 was shot on 35mm and completed for a total of £278.38. He teaches writers and producers in the UK, Europe. Japan and America. He hasalso written three books which have become industry standards: RAINDANCE WRITERS LAB 2nd Edition (Focal Press 2008), RAINDANCE PRODUCERS LAB (Focal Press 2004) and 130 PROJECTS TO GET YOU INTO FILMMAKING (Barrons 2009). Open University awarded Elliot and Honourary Doctorate for services to film education in 2009.

 

Film Festival Directors Programmers and Experts

Casey Baron, Austin Film Festival:

Born and raised in the small island of Dominica located in the West Indies, Casey Baron has been a part of the Austin Film Festival family for five years running; starting off as an intern before climbing the ladder to become the festival’s Shorts Programmer for its 25th anniversary. Casey now serves as AFF's Senior Film Program Director, where he puts together and oversees the festival's entire film slate and pushes forward the festival's mission of championing storytellers. When he’s not racing to find captivating stories, Casey spends his spare time watching basketball and soccer, listening to music, and playing with his dog Niobe.

 

Film Festival Directors Programmers and Experts

Amanda Toney, Stage 32

Amanda Toney has served as the Managing Director of Stage 32 since 2013 where she oversees operations and business development for the global business. She has curated over 1,000 hours of online education created exclusively for Stage 32, and works with hundreds of entertainment industry executives from around the world to serve as educators and mentors. She has spearheaded partnerships with such prestigious organizations as the Cannes Film Festival Marché du Film, American Film Market, SXSW, Austin Film Festival, Raindance Film Festival, Hollyshorts Film Festival, PGA, WGA and DGA. Amanda also manages Stage 32's Screenings platform, which gives films accepted at other festivals a place to screen for industry professionals. Outside of Stage 32, Amanda is a film producer best known for WHAT LIES AHEAD starring Rumer Willis and Emma Dumont and METAPHORMS, a Hungarian production which premiered at the Raindance Film Festival. She recently sold an unscripted TV show to a major US network.

 

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Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

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