The Write Now Challenge: Your Pitch to Adapt Existing Intellectual Property

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The Write Now Challenge

Webinar hosted by: The Write Now Challenge

Based on the Breakdown Webcast by Writers' Room member Stephen Potts, write a pitch for a producer explaining the piece of IP you want to adapt and why. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Based on the Breakdown Webcast by Writers' Room member Stephen Potts, write a pitch for a producer explaining the piece of IP you want to adapt and why.

About Your Instructor

Based on the Breakdown Webcast by Writers' Room member Stephen Potts, write a pitch for a producer explaining the piece of IP you want to adapt and why.

Testimonials

"This was fabulous. Good job everyone" - Becky B.

"Great pitches, everyone!" - Martha C.

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