Understanding and Working With the Guilds & Unions - A Comprehensive Guide

Hosted by Rosi Acosta

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Rosi Acosta

Webinar hosted by: Rosi Acosta

Unit Production Manager, DGA

Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more.   With over three decades of experience, Rosi has worked internationally with production companies from US, Europe, Russia and Latin America.   She began as a Casting Director 32 years ago in Puerto Rico working for director Marcos Zurinaga at Zaga Films where she became one of the top Casting Directors in the Island. After working as such for a few years, she wanted to expand her horizons in production moving on to work with the most important TV producer in the Island, Gabriel Suau, in Telemundo-Puerto Rico, where she worked for several years in various TV shows and telenovelas.   Then her break to become a UPM came when she was recommended to do the job in a Mexican telenovela for Televisa. That was the project that made her realize that working as a UPM for non local productions was her dream come true.   Her extensive experience includes teaching, coordinating over 54 workshops and seminars and an active lobbyist on all film related legislation and affairs which have made her a leader in the industry. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Putting together a project can be complicated. The amount of information to sift through, from guild requirements and guidelines to union rules and even whether to go union or non-union can be overwhelming, confusing and intimidating. For filmmakers, producers and other creatives looking to control their own content, navigating the guilds and the unions can be so daunting, it pushes back production and/or any forward momentum your project might have. Allow us to help demystify, simplify the guilds and unions landscape and get you on your way to doing what you want to most, making your film, TV or digital project.
 
With independent productions on the rise, it's more important than ever to know how to handle your budget and schedule accordingly, and that begins with understanding which guilds you'll be working with and how to deal with their rules and regulations. It also means understanding the ins and outs of the unions. Buttoning up all of these important variables early will assure that nothing falls through the cracks, your set runs smoothly, and there are no unpleasant surprises once you hit the distribution and collection phases of your project.
 
Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more. With over three decades of experience, Rosi has worked internationally with production companies from US, Europe, Russia and Latin America. Rosi began as a casting director 32 years ago in Puerto Rico working for director Marcos Zurinaga at Zaga Films where she became one of the top casting directors in the Island. After working as such for a few years, she wanted to expand her horizons in production moving on to work with the most important TV producer in the Island, Gabriel Suau, in Telemundo-Puerto Rico, where she worked for several years in various TV shows and telenovelas.
 
Rosi will begin by giving you a complete, yet simplified look at the guilds and unions. She will pull back the curtain and discuss the ins and outs and pros and cons of working with the labor organizations. Rosi will go over the differences between unions and guilds and help you decide if you should go union or non-union for your project. You will learn the organizations for above the line - WGAW, WGAE, DGA, SAG/AFTRA and PGA, below the line - IATSE, Teamsters and NLRB, as well as other organizations that work closely with them - ATA, AMPTP, MPAA, ASCAP, CSATF, MPSE and more. In addition you'll learn how to become a member of a union or how to become a signatory production. 
 
 
 
 
"Rosi, your 30 years of experience shined through today. You broke down this so it's easily understandable and now I know that my production this year will be union!"
- Rachel G.
 
 
"Awesome explanations of the unions, guilds and organizations. Very comprehensive."
- Paul F.
 
 
"You made this so easy to understand. Thanks Rosi!"
- Brandon C. 
 
 
"Putting together my first film as a producer almost made my jump off a cliff. I wish I would have seen this first! What a world of difference it would have made. Thank you, Rosi!"
-Marlene D.

What You'll Learn

  • What are Unions and Guilds?
    • Similarities and Differences
    • What Do They Do?
  • History and Importance
    • When Were the First Organizations Formed?
    • Why Do Workers Need Protection?
    • Strikes, Workers United
    • Anti-Union Arguments and Myths
  • Industry Unions and Guilds
  • We’ll go over each of these and what each represents:
    • Above the Line
      • WGAW - Writers Guild of America West
      • WGAE - Writers Guild of America East
      • DGA - Directors Guild of America
      • SAG/AFTRA - Screen Actors Guild/American Federation of Television and Radio Artists
      • PGA - Producers Guild of America
    • Below the Line
      • IATSE - International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees
      • Teamsters
      • National Labor Relations Board
    • Other Organizations That Work Closely With Film Unions and Guild
      • ATA – Association of Talent Agents
      • AMPTP – Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers
      • MPAA – Motion Picture Association
      • ASCAP – American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers
      • CSATF – Contract Services Administration Trust Fund
      • MPSE – Motion Picture Sound Editors
  • Union vs. Non-Union Projects
    • Main Difference Between Each
    • Determining Factors for Your Project to be Union or Non-Union
    • How to Become a Member of a Union
    • How to Become a Signatory Production
  • Q&A with Rosi

About Your Instructor

Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more.
 
With over three decades of experience, Rosi has worked internationally with production companies from US, Europe, Russia and Latin America.
 
She began as a Casting Director 32 years ago in Puerto Rico working for director Marcos Zurinaga at Zaga Films where she became one of the top Casting Directors in the Island. After working as such for a few years, she wanted to expand her horizons in production moving on to work with the most important TV producer in the Island, Gabriel Suau, in Telemundo-Puerto Rico, where she worked for several years in various TV shows and telenovelas.
 
Then her break to become a UPM came when she was recommended to do the job in a Mexican telenovela for Televisa. That was the project that made her realize that working as a UPM for non local productions was her dream come true.
 
Her extensive experience includes teaching, coordinating over 54 workshops and seminars and an active lobbyist on all film related legislation and affairs which have made her a leader in the industry.

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