Understanding a TV Executive's Role (and Why It's Important For You)

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Hosted by Stuart Arbury, TV Executive

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Stuart Arbury, TV Executive

Webinar hosted by: Stuart Arbury, TV Executive

Ramo Law

Stuart is a television executive at Ramo Law. Ramo Law represents a number of producers, financiers, and writers, and are looking to find more clients to work with as well as connect their clients with applicable projects. Their offices work to develop, package and submit material for clients represented by the firm. Ramo Law is currently packaging a Stage 32 writer's script with A-List talent and a top tier producer, as well as multiple other Stage 32 writers not yet announced. Ramo Law has been involved in more than 400 feature and television projects, with over 50 in 2017 alone, and 13 projects at this year's Sundance including WHITE RABBIT, co-executive produced by Ramo Law's Tiffany Boyle and Elsa Ramo. They are looking to expand in the television space, where they have already provided Production and Legal Services on a number of series including Netflix's "Altered Carbon" and "Chef's Table", tru TV's "Those Who Can't", ABC's "This Isn't Working", DirecTV's "Billy & Billie", the Vimeo Original Series "Lonely and Horny", MTV's "Happyland", Hulu's "Battleground", and "Woke Up Dead", which premiered on the Sony Pictures Entertainment owned Crackle. Stu previously served executive positions at Captivate Entertainment (THE BOURNE series), Dimension Films ("Scream", THE MIST, 47 METERS DOWN), and Canvas Media Studios. Stuart was also one of the co-founders of Wolf Knife TV, an award winning online comedy channel. His TV producing and writing credits include "Couchers" and "Bonnie Blake: Parole Officer".   Company credits include: Full Bio »

It is clear that this is the golden age of television with one incredible series after another coming out on cable, streaming and network. If you're interested in breaking into the world of television, there is one key position that you must know the ins and outs of in order to understand the set - a TV Executive. 

An TV Executive plays a huge role in a television production, serving as more than a key developer of story, but also a liaison between various departments on set. We've brought in veteran executive Stuart Arbury from Ramo Law (Ramo Law has worked on Netflix's Altered Carbon & Chef's Table, ABC's This Isn't Working, Hulu's Battleground and more). Stuart himself began his career at Captivate Entertainment, Dimension Films and Canvas Media Studios.

Arbury was the on-set TV executive for MTV's Scream TV series for two seasons, which was based on the classic horror film franchise. In this webinar, Stuart will walk you through an explanation of the television eco-system and share war stories of his time during Scream. Having worked with various department heads, Stuart will also share tips on getting started in Hollywood on a television production. You will walk away with a clear understanding of a TV executive's role and how it relates to your part of the business, whether you're a writer, producer, director, actor or crew.


What You'll Learn:

  • What is a TV executive & how does it relate to various roles on set - writers, producers, actors, directors and more.
  • Understanding a show's inception & how it comes together (Case Study: Scream)
  • The process of finding a showrunner
  • The process of building a writer’s room
  • How different departments work together during pre-production
  • On-set production and what an executive is responsible for
  • How different departments work together during post-production
  • Understanding roles during the release of your show
  • We will also include a discussion on tips for getting started in Hollywood, finding a representative, and getting into writers rooms.
  • Q&A with Stuart

 


About Your Instructor:

Stuart is a television executive at Ramo Law. Ramo Law represents a number of producers, financiers, and writers, and are looking to find more clients to work with as well as connect their clients with applicable projects. Their offices work to develop, package and submit material for clients represented by the firm.

Ramo Law is currently packaging a Stage 32 writer's script with A-List talent and a top tier producer, as well as multiple other Stage 32 writers not yet announced.

Ramo Law has been involved in more than 400 feature and television projects, with over 50 in 2017 alone, and 13 projects at this year's Sundance including WHITE RABBIT, co-executive produced by Ramo Law's Tiffany Boyle and Elsa Ramo. They are looking to expand in the television space, where they have already provided Production and Legal Services on a number of series including Netflix's "Altered Carbon" and "Chef's Table", tru TV's "Those Who Can't", ABC's "This Isn't Working", DirecTV's "Billy & Billie", the Vimeo Original Series "Lonely and Horny", MTV's "Happyland", Hulu's "Battleground", and "Woke Up Dead", which premiered on the Sony Pictures Entertainment owned Crackle.

Stu previously served executive positions at Captivate Entertainment (THE BOURNE series), Dimension Films ("Scream", THE MIST, 47 METERS DOWN), and Canvas Media Studios. Stuart was also one of the co-founders of Wolf Knife TV, an award winning online comedy channel. His TV producing and writing credits include "Couchers" and "Bonnie Blake: Parole Officer".

 

Company credits include:

Stuart ArburyStuart ArburyStuart ArburyStuart Arbury


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