Understanding the Latin American Film Market for Producers & Filmmakers

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Hosted by David Zannoni

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David Zannoni

Webinar hosted by: David Zannoni

International Film Business Specialist at Fintage House

David is consultant for Fintage House and is the company's representative for the Americas. For Fintage David negotiates agreements for films and television series, and he is involved in business development and relationship management specifically in the US, Latin America and Spain. On behalf of Fintage House, David has given presentations, workshops and seminars at universities across the globe and at events such as the yearly conference of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers in the US (NALIP), the Winston Baker Film Finance Conferences, the Rio Film Market and the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM). David runs his consultancy business through Xaman Ha Consulting and Zannoni Media Advisors, and has been focusing particularly on international service providers in the film and TV industries, and film and TV productions in Latin America, amongst others. A Dutch-Italian citizen, David is fluent in English, Spanish, Dutch and Italian, and is basic in German. He has been living in Mexico for the last five years. As a film business specialist David is continuously present at international film markets, festivals and conferences, amongst others: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Spain, and all over Latin America. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

There's no doubt Latin America has become a booming market for foreign productions. Some of the best films of recent years, including 3-time Oscar winner Roma and Cannes Film Festival Palm d'Or nominee Aquarius (produced by a Stage 32 member) all filmed in Latin America.

So, what makes this region so appealing for producers and filmmakers? 

The Latin American film business has been growing for decades. Local and international distribution of Latin American films are on the rise. On the other hand, several countries have become attractive production and filming hubs because of their film and television infrastructures, talented cast and crew, and local incentives for productions.

Your host, David Zannoni, has over a decade of experience on hundreds of film and television projects specializing in Latin America. In this webinar we will give a global overview of the Latin American Film & TV Market, the several benefits it offers and the challenges producers may face. 

What You'll Learn

 

  • Production: the main production hubs under the loop
  • Production incentives for foreign producers
  • Co-Production options
  • Financing: How are Latin American films financed?
  • Distribution: A global overview of the distribution landscape
  • SVOD platforms versus traditional distribution
  • Revenues: how do revenue models work in Latin America
  • Latin American talent and international cross over
  • Film or TV?
  • How to approach business in Latin America
  • Benefits of producing in Latin America
  • Pitfalls to be aware of when producing in Latin America
  • Contracting services: from production to legal and bonding
  • Industry relationships and networking
  • The main Latin American film & TV markets & festivals
  • Q&A with David!

 

About Your Instructor

David is consultant for Fintage House and is the company's representative for the Americas. For Fintage David negotiates agreements for films and television series, and he is involved in business development and relationship management specifically in the US, Latin America and Spain.

On behalf of Fintage House, David has given presentations, workshops and seminars at universities across the globe and at events such as the yearly conference of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers in the US (NALIP), the Winston Baker Film Finance Conferences, the Rio Film Market and the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM).

David runs his consultancy business through Xaman Ha Consulting and Zannoni Media Advisors, and has been focusing particularly on international service providers in the film and TV industries, and film and TV productions in Latin America, amongst others.

A Dutch-Italian citizen, David is fluent in English, Spanish, Dutch and Italian, and is basic in German. He has been living in Mexico for the last five years.

As a film business specialist David is continuously present at international film markets, festivals and conferences, amongst others: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Spain, and all over Latin America.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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