Using Self-Publishing to Enhance Your Screenwriting Career

Learn From NY Times and USA Today Bestselling Author
Hosted by Debra Holland

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Debra Holland

Webinar hosted by: Debra Holland

NY Times Best Selling Author

Debra Holland is the New York Times and USA Today Bestselling author of the award-winning Montana Sky Series (sweet, historical Western romance) and The Gods’ Dream Trilogy (fantasy romance.) Debra is a three-time Romance Writers of America Golden Heart finalist and one-time winner. In 2013, Amazon selected Starry Montana Sky as one of the Top 50 Greatest Love Stories. When she’s not writing, Dr. Debra works as a psychotherapist and corporate crisis/grief counselor. She’s the author of The Essential Guide to Grief and Grieving, a book about helping people cope with all kinds of loss, and Cultivating an Attitude about Gratitude, a Ten Minute Ebook. She’s also a contributing author to The Naked Truth About Self-Publishing. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

The new wave of indie publishing has taken the book industry by storm. Previously unknown and/or unpublished authors are making a living—sometimes a prosperous living--by writing. Traditionally published authors are also developing hybrid careers, where they write for their publishers as well as self-publish. Some successful indie authors are also catching the attention of traditional publishers, who are acquiring their books. 

Screenwriters may struggle to find recognition for their work and make a living with their writing. Often screenwriters must have a “day” job in order to survive, which can leave little time and energy to pursue their dreams of success. Adapting screenplays into a books may produce extra income and recognition, as well as provide other benefits to a screenwriting career.

In this Stage 32 Webinar, Debra Holland will discuss her journey from an unpublished author to a NY Times Bestselling author. In her six years of indie publishing, Debra has sold more than a million books and has made a six-figure income for the last five. She’ll introduce you to self-publishing, provide some tips for adapting your screenplays into books, cover basics to get you started in indie publishing, and help you consider whether self-publishing your screenplays as books might be conducive to your career as a screenwriter.

What You'll Learn

Introduction

My path from unpublished author to New York Times Bestselling Author

 

Why Self Publishing a Book or Books Can Enhance Your Screenwriting Career

Extra income

A bonus to enhance your pitch

Expand your writing skills

Personal satisfaction of controlling your own project and launching it into the world

Building your fan base

Unexpected opportunities

 

Writing Your Material

Why write and publish a book or books?

Differences between writing a script and writing book

  • Scene setting
  • Character Description
  • Interior thoughts and emotion
  • Active language

Picking your genre

 

Learning the Publishing Business

Indie or traditional publishing

Wider Distribution, including foreign markets

  • Perceived Value and Recognition
  • You may (or may not) be paid an advance.
  • You may (or may not) have increased promotion
  • Best for Literary Fiction and individual books

Indie Distribution

  • Control over content, cover, speed to market, sales price, audiobooks, foreign translations, and promotion
  • Higher royalties
  • Genre fiction—Romance, Action Adventure, Science Fiction, Fantasy
  • Assembling your team—editors, cover artist, formatter

Using Kindle Direct Publishing

Uploading your book

 

Now What?

What to do after you publish your ebook

  • Where to print
  • Where to market – tips & tricks
  • Where & how to promote

Managing your expectations

Plugging into the Indie Author Community

Q&A

About Your Instructor

Debra Holland is the New York Times and USA Today Bestselling author of the award-winning Montana Sky Series (sweet, historical Western romance) and The Gods’ Dream Trilogy (fantasy romance.)

Debra is a three-time Romance Writers of America Golden Heart finalist and one-time winner. In 2013, Amazon selected Starry Montana Sky as one of the Top 50 Greatest Love Stories.

When she’s not writing, Dr. Debra works as a psychotherapist and corporate crisis/grief counselor. She’s the author of The Essential Guide to Grief and Grieving, a book about helping people cope with all kinds of loss, and Cultivating an Attitude about Gratitude, a Ten Minute Ebook. She’s also a contributing author to The Naked Truth About Self-Publishing.

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