Voice Acting: 5 Steps to Making Money with Your Voice

Voice Acting
Hosted by Tara Tyler

$49

On Demand Webinar - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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This Next Level Education webinar has a 92% user satisfaction rate.

Tara Tyler

Webinar hosted by: Tara Tyler

Voice Actor & Former Head of Communications at Voice123.com

After being offered a part-time job at the local radio station by one of her customers at the video game store she managed, Tara ended up working in radio for over 10 years as a morning show host, radio personality, creative services director, and production manager. She eventually left radio to do voice over work full-time, including several audiobooks, imaging for radio stations across the country, commercials, and more. She continues to do voice over, but spends most of her time helping others get into voice over as Head of Communications at Voice123.com, the world’s first and largest voice over casting website. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

“Hey! You should be a voice actor!” Has anyone told you that you have a voice that would be perfect for commercials, animated films, or radio? With the new content explosion, especially in animation and documentary filmmaking, the need and market for voice over actors has never been higher. That also means the competition is more intense! So how do you stand out? Don't be intimidated. We've got you covered!

Voice over is a fascinating and fun industry that gives you the flexibility to be your own boss and, thanks to the affordability of recording equipment, can allow you to work from home. 

When you think “voice acting” you may think cartoons, commercials, or video games, and while that is part of the industry, there’s also documentaries, IVR (phone systems), corporate and medical training, e-learning, presentations, mobile games and apps, etc. What used to be a world closed to those who weren’t “in the know” has opened up to everyone who has the talent and drive to do it.

But many people who think they have the talent feel that the path to getting started is too overwhelming. That's simply not the case.

Tara Tyler has been working in the voice over industry for 10+ years and was the Head of Communications for one of the largest V.O. sites on the web. Exclusively for Stage 32, Tara will teach you everything you need to know to turn your fantastic voice into monetary success. From building an affordable home studio to finding and training your voice to making a demo to submitting your demo on and offline and much more, Tara will demystify the myths, tell you the real truths and get you up, running, and working in no time!

 

"I went from "this is impossible" to "I need to do this" in 90 minutes. I've already ordered some equipment and have begun training. I need more Tara in my life!"

- Rashida H.

What You'll Learn

  • Training and vocal exercises
  • Finding your voice - Voice over is a HUGE industry, can you really do it all? How to find out what you are good at and why you should find your niche and focus in.
  • Demos - you will need a professional demo in order to book work. I'll talk about what makes a good demo and how to get one.
  • Building an affordable home studio - A great home studio is no longer a convenience, it is now a requirement if you are going to work online as a professional voice actor.
  • Union vs. non-union voice over work & setting rates
  • Auditioning etiquette when submitting online
  • Collecting payment and dealing with clients
  • Marketing yourself as a voice actor - where to find work: agents, online casting, social media, word of mouth, etc.
  • In depth Q&A session with Tara!

About Your Instructor

After being offered a part-time job at the local radio station by one of her customers at the video game store she managed, Tara ended up working in radio for over 10 years as a morning show host, radio personality, creative services director, and production manager. She eventually left radio to do voice over work full-time, including several audiobooks, imaging for radio stations across the country, commercials, and more. She continues to do voice over, but spends most of her time helping others get into voice over as Head of Communications at Voice123.com, the world’s first and largest voice over casting website.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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