Introduction to Creating a Professional Film Budget: Details, Presentation, Movie Magic and Beyond

Hosted by Rosi Acosta

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Rosi Acosta

Webinar hosted by: Rosi Acosta

Unit Production Manager, DGA

Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more.   With over three decades of experience, Rosi has worked internationally with production companies from US, Europe, Russia and Latin America.   She began as a Casting Director 32 years ago in Puerto Rico working for director Marcos Zurinaga at Zaga Films where she became one of the top Casting Directors in the Island. After working as such for a few years, she wanted to expand her horizons in production moving on to work with the most important TV producer in the Island, Gabriel Suau, in Telemundo-Puerto Rico, where she worked for several years in various TV shows and telenovelas.   Then her break to become a UPM came when she was recommended to do the job in a Mexican telenovela for Televisa. That was the project that made her realize that working as a UPM for non local productions was her dream come true.   Her extensive experience includes teaching, coordinating over 54 workshops and seminars and an active lobbyist on all film related legislation and affairs which have made her a leader in the industry. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

A professional budget is essential to every film, TV, and digital production. It's important that you get your financials in check in order to avoid any surprises once you yell "Action!" This will help avoid overages, delays, and frustration on the set. Putting together a professional budget is not as difficult as you think!

Even if Excel and Movie Magic aren't your specialty, that's OK. You can still learn what you need to do to in order to make sure your budget looks professional. For starters, you must make sure that you have all the pertinent production details and supporting information. You need to proofread your work before it's submitted for the production. In short, before you can create a budget that will keep your production on track, you need to understand all the elements that will make is so. It's not as intimidating as you think, and we're here to help.

Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more. She's committed to helping you understand the basics of creating a professional film budget. 

You'll examine all the pertinent elements of a film budget so you have a clear understanding of what is considered industry standard. You will learn the basics of Movie Magic software and what support documents you will need to help you prepare a professional budget. Rosi will take away the anxiety and simplify the process of creating your film budget!

This presentation will give you confidence to move forward with a professional level budget to ensure your production goes off without a hitch! 

 

"Rosi Acosta is, in a word, awesome. She is a treasure of knowledge and easy to understand! Incredibly detailed."

- Lawrence W.

What You'll Learn

Professional Budget Breakdown

  • Parts of a budget—What is commonly included
  • Levels of a budget-What is commonly included

Presentation of a Professional Film Budget

  • Pertinent production details to include and where to include it
  • Specific information to include in the detail accounts

Efficient Use of Movie Magic Budgeting Software

  • Basic software advantages
  • Correct use of helpful features

What Support Documents & Information You Need to Prepare a Professional Budget

Common Practices That Will Help You Create a Professional Looking/Readable Budget

Tips to Proofread Your Budget Before Submitting It 

Q&A with Rosie

About Your Instructor

Rosi Acosta is a Unit Production Manager, DGA, who has worked on over 75 TV and Film projects and over 100 commercials. She is a valued name in Hollywood as a top UPM who's worked on films such as DRIVEN, SPEED KILLS, IMPRISONED and many more.
 
With over three decades of experience, Rosi has worked internationally with production companies from US, Europe, Russia and Latin America.
 
She began as a Casting Director 32 years ago in Puerto Rico working for director Marcos Zurinaga at Zaga Films where she became one of the top Casting Directors in the Island. After working as such for a few years, she wanted to expand her horizons in production moving on to work with the most important TV producer in the Island, Gabriel Suau, in Telemundo-Puerto Rico, where she worked for several years in various TV shows and telenovelas.
 
Then her break to become a UPM came when she was recommended to do the job in a Mexican telenovela for Televisa. That was the project that made her realize that working as a UPM for non local productions was her dream come true.
 
Her extensive experience includes teaching, coordinating over 54 workshops and seminars and an active lobbyist on all film related legislation and affairs which have made her a leader in the industry.

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