What a Talent Manager Looks for in An Actor

Hosted by Spencer Robinson

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Spencer Robinson

Webinar hosted by: Spencer Robinson

Manager at Art/Work Entertainment

Spencer Robinson is a literary and talent manager at Art/Work Entertainment who's been in the industry for over a decade. Spencer began his career in production and moved into talent management at MBST Entertainment (Woody Allen, Robin Williams, Billy Crystal). For the past 8 years Spencer has been with Art/Work and continues managing both writers and actors for film and television. Spencer’s talent clients have been in films with directors Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, Clint Eastwood, Gore Verbinski, and more. In the TV world, his clients have been regular cast members on shows for Netflix, The CW, Cinemax, CBS, NBC, FX, Starz, Nickelodeon, EPIX, TBS and more. Spencer’s clients have also recurred on series for Freeform, TNT, AMC, Showtime and many more. He reps everyone from actors who are just starting out to actors with 30+ years of credits. He also represents many multihyphenates who are both writers and performers. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Finding the right manager is as important as honing your craft as an actor. But, how do you know if you're representation-ready and how do you know what to expect when you're given the opportunity to be repped? We've brought in talent manager Spencer Robinson, a talent manager at Art/Work Entertainment who's been in the industry for over a decade. 

Spencer’s talent clients have been in films with directors Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, Clint Eastwood, Gore Verbinski, and more. In the TV world, his clients have been regular cast members on shows for Netflix, The CW, Cinemax, CBS, NBC, FX, Starz, Nickelodeon, EPIX, TBS and more. Spencer’s clients have also recurred on series for Freeform, TNT, AMC, Showtime and many more. He reps everyone from actors who are just starting out to actors with 30+ years of credits. He also represents many multihyphenates who are both writers and performers.

In this exclusive Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Spencer will go over everything you need to know about a manager from how to find one, what to do once you get one and how to maintain a long-lasting relationship that help you sustain a career in the industry. Plus! Spencer will be taking your questions, so any burning questions you have for a talent manager you can bring them here!

What You'll Learn

  • What is a Manager?:
    • Defining your team
      • Managers, Agents, Publicists, Attorneys, and Business Managers
    • What a good manager does
      • How different types of companies work
      • What to expect from your manager
      • What not to expect from your manager
  • Finding a Manager
    • What you need before you look for a manager
    • How do you get a manager to notice you
    • Blind submissions: good or bad?
  • The Meeting
    • What to look for when meeting with a potential manager
    • How do you know this is the right manager for you?
    • Types of questions to ask
    • How to stand out in a representation meeting
  • Auditions
    • What Information you should expect from your manager
    • What you should be doing before the audition
    • What you should be doing during the audition
    • What you should not be doing
    • After the Audition
  • When to say Yes and No
    • The 3 types of jobs
    • Why would you pass on a good job?
    • Why say yes to a mediocre job?
  • TV and Feature Deals
    • TV Co-Stars and Guest Stars
    • Recurring roles
    • Series Regular roles
    • Movies
      • Studio Films
      • Indie Films
  • Adding to Your Team
    • Agents
    • Attorneys
    • Publicists
    • Business Managers
  • Q&A
    • Ask me anything

 

About Your Instructor

Spencer Robinson is a literary and talent manager at Art/Work Entertainment who's been in the industry for over a decade. Spencer began his career in production and moved into talent management at MBST Entertainment (Woody Allen, Robin Williams, Billy Crystal). For the past 8 years Spencer has been with Art/Work and continues managing both writers and actors for film and television. Spencer’s talent clients have been in films with directors Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh, Clint Eastwood, Gore Verbinski, and more. In the TV world, his clients have been regular cast members on shows for Netflix, The CW, Cinemax, CBS, NBC, FX, Starz, Nickelodeon, EPIX, TBS and more. Spencer’s clients have also recurred on series for Freeform, TNT, AMC, Showtime and many more. He reps everyone from actors who are just starting out to actors with 30+ years of credits. He also represents many multihyphenates who are both writers and performers.

Questions?

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