How To Deal With Difficult Production Personalities

Losing Battles to Win the War
Hosted by Adrienne Biddle

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Adrienne Biddle

Webinar hosted by: Adrienne Biddle

Partner/Producer at Unbroken Pictures

After receiving a Masters degree from the Peter Stark Producing Program at The University of Southern California, Adrienne began her career at Jersey Films, where she worked on several projects including Man On The Moon, Caveman’s Valentine, Garden State, How High and Erin Brokovitch. In November of 2002, she left Jersey Films to become Vice President of Production and Acquisitions at Summit Entertainment. Summit’s production arm generated five movies during her tenure: Dot The I, Wrong Turn, Lies And Alibis (which she co-produced), and Step Up. In November of 2005, she left Summit to become Rogue Pictures’ Senior Vice President of Production. This genre division of Universal Pictures released several movies during her tenure: Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, Balls Of Fury, Hot Fuzz, The Strangers, Doomsday, Last House On The Left and she was the executive in charge of The Hitcher, The Unborn and Fighting. Rogue was sold to Relativity Media in December 2008. In September of 2009, she partnered with writer/director Bryan Bertino to form Unbroken Pictures. The duo has produced five movies together: He's Out There, written by Mike Scannell and directed by Dennis Iliadis, starring Yvonne Strahovski for Screen Gems; The Blackcoat's Daughter, written and directed by Osgood Perkins, starring Emma Roberts and Kiernan Shipka acquired by A24; Stephanie, written by Ben Collins and Luke Piotrowski, directed by Akiva Goldsman, starring Frank Grillo and Ana Torv for Blumhouse and Universal Pictures; The Monster, written and directed by Bertino, starring Zoe Kazan and Ella Ballentine for A24; and Mockingbird, written and directed by Bertino, for Blumhouse and Universal Pictures. Unbroken is represented by Jason Burns at UTA. She is also a proud member of the Producers Guild of America, and serves on the board of Cinestory, a non-profit dedicated to nurturing new screenwriting talent through its fellowship and annual retreat. The program is aimed at writers with a high level of trade craft who are ready to enter the industry, and encourages participation from writers across the globe.   Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Working in the entertainment industry means you’ll inevitably come across all different types of people – most of whom are passionate, opinionated and sometimes very stubborn. This will inevitably produce confusion, tension, drama, and tough choices all along the way.

But, what do you do when faced with the notorious “difficult” personality, especially when they are crucial to getting your project to the finish line? 

In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, you’ll learn how to spot the troublesome ones, be less troublesome yourself, and generally learn some important tools of the trade when faced with the difficult personality. Your teacher, Adrienne Biddle, has worked as a studio executive and independent producer producing dozens of movies, most recently Stephanie with Blumhouse Productions and He's Out There with Screen Gems. 

The goal is to teach all different types of creative people how to work better together so your project doesn’t fall apart in these moments of crisis.

What You'll Learn

Where Does Difficultly Come From?

  • What are the possible causes?

 

Labeling “Difficult” People

  • There are two sides to every story. We’ll break down difficult personalities by 6 different traits and look at the 2 viewpoints for their behavior.

 

How Do You Recognize a Difficult Personality?

  • 10 signs to help you recognize and be on high alert knowing that you might be working with a difficult personality

 

What Is Your Goal For Your Material?

  • How will a difficult personality team member impact this?

 

Alternative Perspectives:

  • 6 tips to understanding where difficulties may arise on your project

 

Common Difficult Situations

  • 4 common situations that occur in almost every film or tv project, how to identify them and how to overcome them.
  • Bad Notes
  • Being the Last To Know
  • Competing Agendas
  • New Elements with "Thoughts" Added to Your Project

 

Possible Causes for Bad Notes

  • 4 issues to be aware of
  • 6 solutions to deal with conflict from notes

 

Possible Causes for Being the Last To Know

  • 6 issues to be aware of
  • 10 solutions to be “in the know”

 

Possible Causes for Competing Agendas

  • 4 issues to be aware of
  • 4 solutions to align agendas

 

Possible Causes for New Elements Added to Your Project

  • 4 issues to be aware of
  • 6 solutions to understand and identify your allies

When Should You Say NO?

Q&A with Adrienne!

About Your Instructor

After receiving a Masters degree from the Peter Stark Producing Program at The University of Southern California, Adrienne began her career at Jersey Films, where she worked on several projects including Man On The Moon, Caveman’s Valentine, Garden State, How High and Erin Brokovitch.

In November of 2002, she left Jersey Films to become Vice President of Production and Acquisitions at Summit Entertainment. Summit’s production arm generated five movies during her tenure: Dot The I, Wrong Turn, Lies And Alibis (which she co-produced), and Step Up.

In November of 2005, she left Summit to become Rogue Pictures’ Senior Vice President of Production. This genre division of Universal Pictures released several movies during her tenure: Dave Chappelle’s Block Party, Balls Of Fury, Hot Fuzz, The Strangers, Doomsday, Last House On The Left and she was the executive in charge of The Hitcher, The Unborn and Fighting. Rogue was sold to Relativity Media in December 2008.

In September of 2009, she partnered with writer/director Bryan Bertino to form Unbroken Pictures.

The duo has produced five movies together: He's Out There, written by Mike Scannell and directed by Dennis Iliadis, starring Yvonne Strahovski for Screen Gems; The Blackcoat's Daughter, written and directed by Osgood Perkins, starring Emma Roberts and Kiernan Shipka acquired by A24; Stephanie, written by Ben Collins and Luke Piotrowski, directed by Akiva Goldsman, starring Frank Grillo and Ana Torv for Blumhouse and Universal Pictures; The Monster, written and directed by Bertino, starring Zoe Kazan and Ella Ballentine for A24; and Mockingbird, written and directed by Bertino, for Blumhouse and Universal Pictures. Unbroken is represented by Jason Burns at UTA.

She is also a proud member of the Producers Guild of America, and serves on the board of Cinestory, a non-profit dedicated to nurturing new screenwriting talent through its fellowship and annual retreat. The program is aimed at writers with a high level of trade craft who are ready to enter the industry, and encourages participation from writers across the globe.

 

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

  • Great lecture. Some technical issues with screen/bullet points and lecture being pulled up together as a reference for the instructor.

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