Writing Strong Female Characters

Hosted by Jake Detharidge

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This Next Level Education webinar has a 93% user satisfaction rate.

Jake Detharidge

Webinar hosted by: Jake Detharidge

Independent Development & Production Executive

Jake Detharidge is the former head story analyst in the story department at WME where he oversaw the entire literary catalogue for the agency as well as all coverage and submissions. After WME, Jake moved on to run development for director Luke Greenfield. Here, Jake helped Luke develop his studio feature Let's be Cops with Simon Kinberg producing and shot through 20th Century Fox. He became Head of Development at 3311 Productions and is now an independent producer. Jake began his career at Marty Katz Productions as a development exec, transition next to the then newly formed WME. At WME, Jake became the head story analyst in the story department, overseeing the entire literary catalogue for the agency as well as all coverage and submissions. During this period he began working with Eric Reid in the Film/TV Rights department and eventually oversaw all property rights for the Beverly Hills office. After WME, Jake moved on to run development for director Luke Greenfield (The Animal, Girl Next Door, Role Models, Something Borrowed) and WideAwake Inc. Here, Jake helped Luke develop his studio feature Let's be Cops with Simon Kinberg producing and shot through 20th Century Fox. Jake also worked on the 2012 ABC pilot Prairie Dogs, as well as 3 other studio features. Still hoping to broaden his horizons, Jake then moved on the newly formed financing company, 3311. During his time at 3311 Jake has helped oversee the post-production and sale of their first two feature films as well as the development of six other projects in various stages of pre-production. Mr. Detharidge's experiences have given him a unique opportunity to sample material from all areas and arenas of the industry, as well as providing him with a wealth of contacts and information. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Learn directly from Jake Detharidge, Producer and former Head of Story for WME and Head of Development and Production at 3311 Productions (In A World... starring Lake Bell, Eva Longoria and Big Sur starring Kate Bosworth)

Now, more than ever a strong female protagonist is in the spotlight. When we speak with executives that work with Stage 32 they are thrilled with the evolution of multidimensional female characters who are winning over audiences. To be able to write strong female characters, you need to know the current industry landscape for female driven content so you can understand how to analyze, create and execute genuine female characters.

We have brought in one of the leading Development and Production Executives - Jake Detharidge from 3311 Productions - who will be teaching our Stage 32 writers how to write strong female characters in an exclusive 90 minute live and interactive online webinar. Having worked on films with Kate Bosworth, Lake Bell, Eva Longoria and many more, Jake knows what it takes to truly make your female characters stand out on the page and on the screen. Jake received a 99% satisfaction rate when he taught previous webinars for Stage 32, so we had to bring him back!

What You'll Learn

Jake will focus mainly on the deeply ingrained, cultural, spiritual and philosophical ideology surrounding female characters so you can learn how to properly write them into your stories. In addition, he will walk you through how the current gatekeepers and power players view female characters and content, how and why that point of view is in place, and what you can do to execute or transcend the status quo. You will go through the current pitfalls, triumphs, and - most importantly - philosophical ideologies at play in today’s marketplace.

  • What the current Industry POV is for female characters and female driven content.
  • In-depth case study of a successful film he worked on that was centered around a strong female character.
    • What worked and why?
    • What you should learn from this.
  • The ‘what’ and ‘why’ to consider when deciding on your female driven story.
    • From a writing perspective, he will break down the creative reasoning and marketplace opportunities for choosing female driven characters, stories, and projects.
  • What are some of the major stereotypes and pitfalls that hurt female driven content in the development and packaging stages?
    • He will really dive into the writing and creative mistakes most people consciously – and more importantly, subconsciously – make when tackling female characters.
  • What are some of the tricks and loopholes to take advantage of?
    • There are dozens upon dozens of great stories/ideas/IP/worlds/themes/etc. out there, right now, which no one is looking at from a female perspective.
    • And they are all out there for you! This webinar will show you how to look for and take advantage of them.
  • MOST IMPORTANT: How do you create and execute amazing female driven stories?
    • Why do men write female characters so poorly, while women write male characters so well?
    • Who are our characters at their most basic level?
    • What role does their gender play in their reality within the story, and how does that actually affect their actions and dialogue.
  • What are the subconscious stereotypes and weak clichés that plague even the most open-minded writer?
    • We live in a society of people politely going about, never saying what they really mean” – Why do we really have the current stereotypes that exist today in the media?
    • How does this subconsciously affect our own writing?
  • Why is it so hard for most creators to deliver truly original female driven content?
    • We have to look at our own personal stereotypes before we can deliver realistic, strong and engaging female driven characters.
    • From a technical writing standpoint, this is maybe the easiest, quickest way to immediately improve your female characters or story.
  • Why we cannot change, as an industry – let alone as a society, until we change the perspective on female characters and female driven content.
    • “We can not tell the stories of our present, until we let go the stories of our past"
  • Recorded, in-depth Q&A with Jake!

About Your Instructor

Jake Detharidge is the former head story analyst in the story department at WME where he oversaw the entire literary catalogue for the agency as well as all coverage and submissions. After WME, Jake moved on to run development for director Luke Greenfield. Here, Jake helped Luke develop his studio feature Let's be Cops with Simon Kinberg producing and shot through 20th Century Fox. He became Head of Development at 3311 Productions and is now an independent producer.

Jake began his career at Marty Katz Productions as a development exec, transition next to the then newly formed WME. At WME, Jake became the head story analyst in the story department, overseeing the entire literary catalogue for the agency as well as all coverage and submissions. During this period he began working with Eric Reid in the Film/TV Rights department and eventually oversaw all property rights for the Beverly Hills office.

After WME, Jake moved on to run development for director Luke Greenfield (The Animal, Girl Next Door, Role Models, Something Borrowed) and WideAwake Inc. Here, Jake helped Luke develop his studio feature Let's be Cops with Simon Kinberg producing and shot through 20th Century Fox. Jake also worked on the 2012 ABC pilot Prairie Dogs, as well as 3 other studio features.

Still hoping to broaden his horizons, Jake then moved on the newly formed financing company, 3311. During his time at 3311 Jake has helped oversee the post-production and sale of their first two feature films as well as the development of six other projects in various stages of pre-production. Mr. Detharidge's experiences have given him a unique opportunity to sample material from all areas and arenas of the industry, as well as providing him with a wealth of contacts and information.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Testimonials

"Jake's feedback is so valuable. I enjoy everything webinar and class Jake does. He's always informative and always presents information in a very smart and succinct way. Great webinars/classes..." - R. Canty

"Great information. So many take-aways. I learned things I never knew before about how the studios and execs work. It was sobering." - C. Joseph

"Seldom have I met execs in LA who know what they're talking about but don't throw around their ego. Jake loves the process, nice perspective with a positive spin." - N. Kellis

"This was one of the more beneficial seminars with current relative information in the industry. Really enjoyed it." - M. McLinn

"Very informative and well presented. Lots of food for thought. Jake presents in a conversational manner and seems to be speaking one on one."- G. DeSomber

"Jake was incredibly knowledgeable and did a great job getting through his presentation while also answering a ton of questions." - C. Krapf

"Good presenter. Enthusiastic and knowledgeable." - G. Nicholson

"Terrific content and very insightful - Jake's "Think outside the box!" approach is empowering and he gave really clear examples on how to do this." - F. Burst

"Enormous amount of truth, honesty and street smarts you gave. Blew four major misconceptions I had about selling a limited series. Felt like I was right in the game, hearing you talk about it." - K. Belsky

"Jake was fantastic. I love his passion and generosity. Really appreciate how much valuable, first-hand experience he shared (including specifics about his own projects) as well as his candid opinion." - L. Curney

"Thanks for an informative, no bullsh*t session with real life examples. I especially appreciated your honesty about how there's no definitive way to pitch, or to package and sell a miniseries. At the same time, you gave great advice about pitfalls to avoid. I feel smarter and more prepared. It was worth the price of admission!" - S. Satterfield

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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