30-Minute Comedy Television Pilot Writing Lab - One on One Mentoring with Literary Manager

Payment plans available - contact edu@stage32.com for details
Taught by Spencer Robinson - Comedy Literary Manager

$599
Lab Schedule (4 sessions):
Saturday, Sep 28TH 10 - 11:30AM PDT
Saturday, Oct 5TH 10 - 11:30AM PDT
Saturday, Oct 19TH 10 - 11:30AM PDT
Saturday, Nov 16TH 10 - 11:30AM PST
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Who Should Attend:

This lab is designed for intermediate screenwriters looking to build a comedy pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea. This is an intensive lab and will require full writing effort.

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Spencer Robinson - Comedy Literary Manager

Manager at Art/Work Entertainment

Spencer Robinson was born and raised in Los Angeles, and got his start in the film industry as a production assistant on glamorous productions like car commercial, cereal commercial, and other car commercial. He then landed a job in the mailroom at MBST Entertainment, where he learned about management from some of the legends of “old-school Hollywood.” Spencer then moved to an assistant desk at Cornice Entertainment, and eventually to Howard Entertainment. At Howard Ent, Spencer worked with actors, writers, and comedians. It was here that not only advanced his knowledge of talent and lit, but he also learned all about managing tour dates for nationally and internationally touring comics. After a 2-year stint at Howard Entertainment, Spencer spent 5 years as a musician touring in a rock ‘n’ roll band, playing for audiences across 15 countries. Once he returned from this adventure, he came back to the film industry, working as an assistant at Verve Entertainment, where he was eventually promoted to manager. When Verve merged with Art/Work, Spencer came along for the ride, and has been there ever since. Art/Work Entertainment is a boutique management company that represents actors, writers, and comedians. This development season, Art/Work has already sold two comedic pilots, and are in the process of taking out more. They have writers and performers from shows like Workaholics, Eastbound and Down, The Mick, Stevie TV, Will & Grace, The Goldbergs, and many more. They also have writers and actors working on features for major studios. The comedian clients tour nationally and internationally, and several are also hyphenates who act and write in addition to doing standup. Spencer has been a manager for 10 years. He loves to watch TV, and even sleeps sometimes. Full Bio »

Summary

  • Payment plans are available - contact edu@stage32.com for details
  • Only 10 Spots Available
  • If you have to miss a class, don't worry. Each class is recorded and you can watch on-demand

PRE-CLASS PREP - Read your syllabus and plan out your writing ideas. Begin to think about 1-2 ideas that might be a good idea for your comedy pilot. Start to prepare for your pilot pitch.

 

Class #1 – Introduction, Character, World

This week we will cover the syllabus, your instructor's background and experience, your goals for this eight-week lab and launch into a discussion on creating strong characters for your pilot.

We will discuss the types of comedy pilots and how they differ from network to network. This will include a discussion about Single-Camera and Multi-Camera comedies. Then we will delve into character – what makes for strong characters and weak ones. Also knowing the world your show takes place in.

You will have a writing assignment this week.

 

Class #2 – Pilot Outline, Pitch Document

This week we will break down pilot structure, plot and subplots. Pilot structure varies depending on the type of comedy pilot (single-camera or multi-camera) and the network (broadcast, cable, streaming, digital, etc.) We will identify what kind of network to target for your story idea and structure the pilot accordingly. We will also discuss the function of your pitch document. This will include incorporating your character descriptions as well as the pilot storyline, and arc of your show.

You will have a writing assignment this week.

 

One-On-One Consultations - Pilot Outline Review  (No Online Class)

This week will consist of one-on-one consultations regarding your pitch document. Each writer will send in their pitch document in advance and will have a 10-minute call to discuss what works and what doesn’t.

The assignment for the week is to address any notes given on the pitch document before proceeding with next week’s class.

 

Class #3– Structure, Scenes, Dialogue. Time to Write your Pilot!

We will discuss both the Single-Camera and Multi-Camera structure. You will decide which works best for the pilot that you are developing. We will address the qualities of effective (and ineffective) scenes, dialogue, and jokes.

We will also go over all the necessary story beats that exist in a comedy pilot, including traditional page count, act breaks, tags, etc.

After this class, you will have 3-4 weeks to complete the first draft of your pilot. Spencer will be available during this time with any questions you have during the process. 

 

One-On-One Consultations - Pilot Notes  (No Online Class)

The assignment this week will be to incorporate any notes given on the pilot before proceeding with next week’s class.

 

Class #4– After You Write Your Pilot

Last online class. We will discuss what happens when you take meetings with managers, agents, and showrunners, and how to pitch a comedy pilot.

We will also discuss other kinds of TV comedy writing (late-night talk shows, sketch, political comedy talk shows, etc.)

What You'll Learn

By popular demand, we've brought back literary manager Spencer Robinson from Art/Work Entertainment to teach an intensive 6-week comedy TV pilot writing lab.

In this lab we will be going through the entire process of writing a half hour television pilot, and a pitch document for your series. We will go over the structures for both single camera and multi camera pilots, and discuss the differences in network, cable, and streaming series. We will also talk about writing for late night comedy talk and sketch shows. By the end of the lab, my goal is for you to have a completed half hour pilot and pitch document ready to show to producers or potential representatives.

Here's just some of what Spencer's recent lab writers have to say:

"Spencer will get those who are ready on their way to a kickass first draft that you can send for coverage, which is what I did. 2 Considers and I'm in rewrites now to move that needle. This was my first ever TV pilot!" - Erika N.

"Spencer was amazing!" - Summer K.

"Enjoyed the class. Spencer was a good teacher and I appreciated his insight!" - Stephen C.

"Had a great time learning and progressing my knowledge of the craft of writing and working directly with a mentor who is a professional in the industry. Spencer was fantastic to be taught by! Thank you!" - Natalie A.

"Spencer's teaching style is the best! His patience and easygoing approach is ideal and unique to him. Kudos to Stage 32 and to Spencer!" - Armando O.


 

This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a comedy pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea and learn how to pitch it. With more and more production companies heading into TV with more channels available for comedy content, knowing how to write a strong comedy TV drama pilot will give you a competitive advantage and help you find success as a TV writer!

The main objective of this 8-week lab will be to complete a first draft of your script and learn how to pitch it. You will meet online with Spencer for 90 minutes a week in a class setting, plus have phone consultations during the weeks when you don't have an online class. This will be accompanied by weekly homework assignments to guide you on your way to creating a marketable, unique pilot that will grab the industry's attention. This Lab is Limited to 20 People.

 

About Your Instructor

Spencer Robinson was born and raised in Los Angeles, and got his start in the film industry as a production assistant on glamorous productions like car commercial, cereal commercial, and other car commercial. He then landed a job in the mailroom at MBST Entertainment, where he learned about management from some of the legends of “old-school Hollywood.”

Spencer then moved to an assistant desk at Cornice Entertainment, and eventually to Howard Entertainment. At Howard Ent, Spencer worked with actors, writers, and comedians. It was here that not only advanced his knowledge of talent and lit, but he also learned all about managing tour dates for nationally and internationally touring comics.

After a 2-year stint at Howard Entertainment, Spencer spent 5 years as a musician touring in a rock ‘n’ roll band, playing for audiences across 15 countries. Once he returned from this adventure, he came back to the film industry, working as an assistant at Verve Entertainment, where he was eventually promoted to manager. When Verve merged with Art/Work, Spencer came along for the ride, and has been there ever since.

Art/Work Entertainment is a boutique management company that represents actors, writers, and comedians. This development season, Art/Work has already sold two comedic pilots, and are in the process of taking out more. They have writers and performers from shows like Workaholics, Eastbound and Down, The Mick, Stevie TV, Will & Grace, The Goldbergs, and many more. They also have writers and actors working on features for major studios. The comedian clients tour nationally and internationally, and several are also hyphenates who act and write in addition to doing standup. Spencer has been a manager for 10 years. He loves to watch TV, and even sleeps sometimes.

Schedule

September 28: Class #1 – Introduction, Character, World

October 5: Class #2 – Pilot Outline, Pitch Document

October 12: One-On-One Consultations - Pilot Outline Review (No Online Class)

October 19: Class #3 – Structure, Scenes, Dialogue. Time to Write your Pilot!

(Break to write your television pilot under the guidance of literary manager Spencer Robinson)

November 16: One-On-One Consultations - Pilot Notes (No Online Class)

November 23 Class #4– After You Write Your Pilot

 

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a lab?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Labs are typically 5 to 8 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer

Q: What if I cannot attend the live lab session?
A: If you cannot attend a live lab session, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A 48 hours after the live session.

Q: Will I have access to the lab afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live intensive lab, you will have on-demand access to the audio and visual recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Testimonials

"Spencer will get those who are ready on their way to a kickass first draft that you can send for coverage, which is what I did. 2 Considers and I'm in rewrites now to move that needle. This was my first ever TV pilot!" - Erika N.

"Spencer was amazing!" - Summer K.

"Enjoyed the class. Spencer was a good teacher and I appreciated his insight!" - Stephen C.

"Had a great time learning and progressing my knowledge of the craft of writing and working directly with a mentor who is a professional in the industry. Spencer was fantastic to be taught by! Thank you!" - Natalie A.

"Spencer's teaching style is the best! His patience and easygoing approach is ideal and unique to him. Kudos to Stage 32 and to Spencer!" - Armando O.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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8-Week Intensive TV Comedy Pilot Writing Lab (2017)

**Payment plans are available - contact edu@stage32.com for details*** **If you have to miss a class, don't worry. Each class is recorded and you can watch on-demand** PRE-CLASS PREP - Read your syllabus and plan out your writing ideas. Begin to think about 1-2 ideas that might be a good idea for your comedy pilot. Start to prepare for your pilot pitch. WEEK #1 – Introduction, Character, World This week we will cover the syllabus, your instructor's background and experience, your goals for this eight-week lab and launch into a discussion on creating strong characters for your pilot. We will discuss the types of comedy pilots and how they differ from network to network. This will include a discussion about Single-Camera and Multi-Camera comedies. We will go over how to create effective loglines and pitch documents. Then we will delve into character – what makes for strong characters and weak ones. Also knowing the world your show takes place in. We will also discuss other kinds of TV comedy writing (late-night talk shows, sketch, political comedy talk shows, etc.) The assignment for this week will be to create a document with a detailed description (around half a page) on each of your series regular characters, and an explanation of the world. WEEK #2 – Pilot Outline, Pitch Document This week we will break down pilot structure, plot and subplots. Pilot structure varies depending on the type of comedy pilot (single-camera or multi-camera) and the network (broadcast, cable, streaming, digital, etc.) We will identify what kind of network to target for your story idea and structure the pilot accordingly. We will also discuss the function of your series bible and what it needs to include to support your pilot. The assignment for the week is to complete a pitch document with characters, pilot outline, and future episode ideas. WEEK #3 – Pilot Outline (One on One Consultations – No Online Class) This week will consist of one-on-one consultations regarding pilot structure. Each writer will send in their pilot outline in advance and will have a 10-minute call to discuss what works and what doesn’t. The assignment for the week is to address any notes given on the outline and pitch document before proceeding with next week’s class. WEEK #4– Structure, Scenes, Dialogue, We will discuss both the Single-Camera and Multi-Camera structure. You will decide which works best for the pilot that you are developing. We will address the qualities of effective (and ineffective) scenes, dialogue, and jokes. The assignment for the week will be to write three complete scenes from your outline: the cold open, a scene introducing your main character(s), and a scene with strong jokes. WEEK #5– Pilot Structure This week we will go over all the necessary story beats that exist in a comedy pilot, including traditional page count, act breaks, tags, etc. The assignment this week will be to complete a first draft of your pilot WEEK #6– After You Write Your Pilot Last online class. We will discuss what happens when you take meetings with managers, agents, and showrunners, and how to pitch a comedy pilot. The assignment for the week is come up with a pitch for your pilot WEEK #7–Consultation for Revision (No Online Class) This week will consist of one-on-one consultations. Each writer will have a 10-minute call to pitch your pilot. WEEK #8– One-on-one Feedback and Polish (No Online Class) This week will consist of one-on-one consultations. Each writer will have a 10-minute call to go over notes on the pitch and script. Final notes and next steps for your pilot will be given.

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