Film Crew Essentials - Learn to Become An Unforgettable Crew Member

Breaking in Below The Line
Taught by Kenny Chaplin

$249

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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This Next Level Education class has a 92% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Kenny Chaplin

(DGA & DGC AD), Former PA to Ang Lee, Terrence Malick, Ridley Scott and David Mamet

About Your Instructor, Kenny Chaplin: Kenny Chaplin (DGA & DGC Assistant Director) brings to you his sixteen years in the trenches of the Hollywood film industry to Stage 32. He has worked hand-in-hand with directors David Mamet, Terrence Malick, Ang Lee, and Ridley Scott. He has 'wrangled' Dustin Hoffman, John Cusack, Woody Harrelson, Sean Penn, and Eva Longoria and has worked on the films End of Days, Dude, Where’s My Car?, Body of Lies, Runaway Jury, The Thin Red Line and the literary classic Moby Dick. Kenny has been presenting live seminars since 2005 across North America in places such as Iowa, Ohio, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, Missouri, Kansas, Virginia, Wyoming, Saskatchewan, etc. He currently presents live Beyond the Basics: Film Crew Essentials – Production Dept - which provides the practical/technical film set protocol, etiquette, and safety training. Full Bio »

Summary

So you want to make a film but don’t know where to start, you’ve graduated with a film degree, but don’t know how to get your ‘foot’ in the door, OR you’ve had the good fortune of being involved in a feature film that came to your community – and you now have the ‘bug’ – you WANT to work in film – sound familiar?

Stage 32 is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 4 part class: Film Crew Essentials - Learn to Become An Unforgettable Crew Member taught by Kenny Chaplin, Assistant Director and veteran industry insider who here to teach you everything you need to know regarding below the line positions and the inner workings of major motion picture film sets.

This 4 part class will teach you the culture, protocol, and skills required to work and stand out within the highly competitive “below-the-line” departments of the film industry. Gain the confidence to walk onto any film set with the know-how of a road weary veteran. 

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Kenny is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate!

What You'll Learn

4 part class taught by Kenny Chaplin, DGA/DGC Assistant Director who was formerly a PA for Terrence Malik, Ang Lee, David Mamet and Ridley Scott! AVAILABLE ON DEMAND!

"Although billed as entry level film industry training, it is in fact an excellent overall look at filmmaking on the studio level delivered by an experienced and engaging instructor. It is useful for everyone interested in entering the business in any position. I highly recommend Kenny Chaplin to provide basic training for emerging filmmakers in any jurisdiction." - Peg Owens, Idaho Film Office Commissioner

"This class was very beneficial to have Mr. Chaplin, someone who clearly knows and loves the field he is in, teach this course. There is nothing more motivating than learning from someone who is passionate and respects his work." - Crystal Leader

"Kenny Chaplin is a sharing and knowledgeable instructor, the blend of local talents with Kenny's direction made this one of the most informative and educational experiences I have had. Ever. The seminar was outstanding, many thanks for all the hard work and passion in creating this successful workshop." - Nancy Grayson

Part 1 - Pre-Production

What happens during pre-production? What are three key meetings crucial for pre-production, and how do you fit in? Kenny answers these and more, including running through who is on the “Director's Team”.

Part 2 - Your First Day

Kenny goes through what your first day on set looks like, including what personal belongings and “tools” might be required. He explores set protocol and etiquette, walkie talkie protocol, film lingo and background tricks of the trade and etiquette.

Part 3 - Other Departments and Script Breakdown

Kenny defines the duties of various types of PA's include “office” and “location”. He runs through the key elements of a script and how they're broken down on set. Lastly, he discusses the various types of documents anyone on set should be familiar with.

Part 4 - Safety, Unions and Resumes

Kenny discusses personal safety concerns as well as safety in the workplace. What are the key labor organizations? How do I tell time in the film business? Lastly, Kenny discusses “film friendly resumes” and how to ace the interview as well as where to find job listings.

About Your Instructor

About Your Instructor, Kenny Chaplin:

Kenny Chaplin (DGA & DGC Assistant Director) brings to you his sixteen years in the trenches of the Hollywood film industry to Stage 32. He has worked hand-in-hand with directors David Mamet, Terrence Malick, Ang Lee, and Ridley Scott. He has 'wrangled' Dustin Hoffman, John Cusack, Woody Harrelson, Sean Penn, and Eva Longoria and has worked on the films End of Days, Dude, Where’s My Car?, Body of Lies, Runaway Jury, The Thin Red Line and the literary classic Moby Dick.

Kenny has been presenting live seminars since 2005 across North America in places such as Iowa, Ohio, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Louisiana, Missouri, Kansas, Virginia, Wyoming, Saskatchewan, etc.

He currently presents live Beyond the Basics: Film Crew Essentials – Production Dept - which provides the practical/technical film set protocol, etiquette, and safety training.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Testimonials

Testimonials:

"Although billed as entry level film industry training, Kenny Chaplin's Film Crew Essentials is in fact an excellent overall look at filmmaking on the studio level delivered by an experienced and engaging instructor. It is useful for everyone interested in entering the business in any position. I highly recommend Kenny Chaplin to provide basic training for emerging filmmakers in any jurisdiction." - Peg Owens, Idaho Film Office Commissioner

"This class was very beneficial to have Mr. Chaplin, someone who clearly knows and loves the field he is in, teach this course. There is nothing more motivating than learning from someone who is passionate and respects his work." - Crystal Leader

"Kenny Chaplin is a sharing and knowledgeable instructor, the blend of local talents with Kenny's direction made this one of the most informative and educational experiences I have had. Ever. The seminar was outstanding, many thanks for all the hard work and passion in creating this successful workshop." - Nancy Grayson

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If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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How to Produce & Shoot a Successful Low Budget Horror Film

Low budget horror films have never been hotter or more in demand. Last year, The Hollywood Reporter stated that the horror genre was saving the film business and that low budget horror was helping to lead the charge. More and more companies are looking to follow the Blumhouse model of making horror films on the cheap and then raking it in at the box office and VOD. Even the streaming platforms have jumped in with both feet. But make no mistake, just because many of these production companies and filmmakers are keeping their costs down, they are not skimping on quality. Quite the opposite in fact. Horror film aficionados demand great stories, memorable characters and scares that are earned. They want fresh ideas, a unique vision, and an experience they can return to again and again. To stand out from the crowd, you need to be prepared not only to find or produce great material, but to understand how to navigate the landscape. More people produce and shoot horror than just about any other genre. And in such a crowded field, it can be hard to stand out. Go to any film market or horror trade show and you are instantly inundated with posters for dozens if not hundreds of horror features, short films, television shows and digital content looking for a home. After a while, everything seems to look the same. But there is a way to break out of that crowded field and assure that your work gets seen, bought, distributed and/or screened. And we have just the guy to show you how to get it done. Nick Phillips knows horror. In his 20 years in the business, Nick has worked, developed and produced films for Miramax and Sony Screen Gems. In 2012, Nick co-founded his own production company specializing in genre films, the Revolver Picture Company. Just some of the films Nick has worked on include Scream, Halloween, Hellraiser, the Crow, Vacancy, Feast and The Roommate. Now, exclusively for Stage 32, Nick will share his knowledge on how to create terrifying films at not-so-terrifying costs. Films the industry wants to have a piece of and horror fans won't be able to get enough of. Nick will start by teaching you one of the most common failings of producers and filmmakers within the horror space, namely what you should look for in a horror script. From there, he will talk development and the production process during this all important period of the project's evolution. Nick will show you how to stretch your budget dollar, by minimizing locations (but maximizing how you use them), making the right hires, keeping the shoot moving and staying on schedule. He will teach you his tricks on working with actors during the most intense scenes and keeping them motivated. Speaking of actors, he will discuss whether name talent matters or whether choosing the best actor for the part is a better approach.  He will show you how to get the best production value throughout the film. And everyone knows, a great horror movie demands a sequel! Nick will show you how to set yourself up so that your project is franchise ready.   This is a fully comprehensive overview of how to immerse yourself in the horror genre as a producer and/or filmmaker.   "I have no desire to work in any other genre outside of horror. I've been frustrated that my vision always seems to be too expensive for the money I have available. Thank you, Nick, for showing me the path to seeing my vision through while keeping my costs down. I'm inspired again!" Matt H.   "There is nothing scary about this webinar. It's fantastic." Devon M.   "Man, was this eye opening. I have seen the light and now know how to keep my costs in check. Let the blood flow!" - Francisco D.   "My all female slasher grindhouse project is back on my production slate thanks to you, Nick. I don't know how that makes you feel, but I feel fantastic!" - Marissa G.

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