How To Hook Your Reader In The First 5 Pages

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Taught by Regina Lee

$189

On Demand Class - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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This Next Level Education class has a 91% user satisfaction rate.

Class hosted by: Regina Lee

Producer

About Your Instructor, Regina Lee: On the producing side, Regina Lee has teamed with showrunner Rob Thomas (creator of iZombie, Veronica Mars, Party Down), Owen Wilson, and This American Life to sell a pilot to HBO in a 4-network bidding war. She also teamed with Emmy-winning showrunner Rene Balcer (Law & Order) to sell a pilot to Starz. As a production company executive with a deal at CBS Network, she was on the team that sold multiple projects to CBS and The CW. She began her executive career at Universal Pictures, where she worked on films such as American Wedding, Curious George, The Good Shepherd (Matt Damon, Angelina Jolie, Robert DeNiro), The Fast & the Furious 3, Bridget Jones 2, The Cat in the Hat, Seabiscuit, and Red Dragon. Look for Regina’s comments in the Stage 32 Lounge. Full Bio »

Summary

3-part previously recorded online class taught by Regina Lee, Producer and Former Studio Executive who’s developed and/or supervised movies and TV shows set up at Universal Pictures, 20th Century Fox, New Regency Productions, New Line Cinema, Summit Entertainment, MRC Film, HBO Series, Starz, CBS, The CW, Sony TV, and Paramount TV!

As you break into writing professionally, the one thing you’ll always need to do is to hook your reader from the get-go, within the first 5 pages of your project. Whether you’re submitting your script to a screenwriting contest, a manager, an agent, a non-writing producer, a series showrunner/producer, a financier, a star, or a director, you have to get through your reader’s initial skepticism and earn every single page that is read.

In fact, first impressions are cemented when reading page 1. And that goes for all scripts, whether you’re a beginner trying to place in your first contest, or you’re a professional, with scripts sold to major studios and networks. It’s a challenge that never goes away.

Stage 32 is excited to bring you the previously-recorded 3 part class: How To Hook Your Reader In Only 5 Pages, taught by producer and former studio executive Regina Lee! In this class, Regina covers what executives are looking for, the typical paradigms for a script’s opening, what an opening must deliver, and how you can give executives what they want to see. You will leave this class with a solid understanding of how to get your reader hooked in only 5 pages or less!

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Although Regina is no longer reviewing the assignments, we still encourage all listeners to participate.

 

Testimonials:

"Thanks for a wonderful class! Your efforts have been amazing." -Heather F.

"Great class, very helpful and useful information." -John R.

"Thank you for a great class filled with valuable info. I think the way you delivered the info seemed fresh and insightful. A few different slants to the way I see the same material made a difference. The point about ‘clean writing’ really resonated with me. I appreciate your ‘personal’ content in what to expect, your encouragement, etc. Thank you so very much." -Lynne L.

"I've just watched the recording in the UK and I have to say the content was brilliant! I learnt so much in that 2 hours, especially knowing you are the real deal. It makes the information so much more valuable to me." -David E.

"It was a great educational experience taking your class!" -Heather P.

"Regina offers great insight, [this class] instantly made me a better writer.” - David L.

"I just re-wrote my first five pages based on this class and Regina's incredibly insightful feedback, and wow! What a difference it made. This class is a "must take" Stage 32'ers!" - Shari F.

What You'll Learn

Part 1 - Introduction: Who is Your Reader & What Are They Thinking

Regina will cover what readers are looking for when they read your material and what their considerations/criteria are as they evaluate the market viability of your project.

  • Regina will introduce herself to the class and talk about her experience in Film and TV.
  • She will go over who will be reading your script as you make your way into the major LA/NY studio and indie film systems and the Hollywood TV system.
  • The discussion will range from screenwriting contest readers, to managers and agents, to producers to financiers, to the actors and directors who bring value to a project.
  • You will learn what it’s like to sit on the other side of the table, which will help your own presentation and strategy.

Part 2 - Effective Paradigms of a Script’s Opening

Regina will go over effective paradigms typically used to open scripts, including teaser openings, openings which set up the protagonist, openings which convey the backstory and mythology of a new world, and openings which are set-pieces unto themselves.

  • Regina will explain these paradigms by referencing popular movies and TV shows for clarity.
  • She will discuss genre expectations, using the opening to fully set-up the protagonist, and using the opening to establish tone.
  • She will also cover how to use the opening to set up protagonists that audiences can relate to and root for.
  • Then she will offer tips on how to better execute the elements that have been discussed.
  • Regina will also go over the previous week’s homework in class and analyze some projects that volunteers put forward for discussion.

Part 3 - Analyzing Well-Executed Openings

Regina will lead the class in analyzing several well-executed openings in both Film and TV, ranging in genre and tone.

  • Students will be given sample scripts of the first 5 pages of successful movies such as The 40 Year-Old Virgin, American Pie, American Beauty, and hit TV show pilots such as The Strain and Grey’s Anatomy.
  • The class will discuss the first 5-10 minutes of movies/shows like Jaws, Jerry Maguire, and Friends.
  • Students will also be given the first 5 pages of a few well-written scripts that have sold to studios, but have not yet been produced.
  • Regina will go over the previous week’s homework in class, which will involve class members writing their own 5-page openings. Volunteers can put forward their own script openings for analysis and discussion.

About Your Instructor

About Your Instructor, Regina Lee:

On the producing side, Regina Lee has teamed with showrunner Rob Thomas (creator of iZombie, Veronica Mars, Party Down), Owen Wilson, and This American Life to sell a pilot to HBO in a 4-network bidding war. She also teamed with Emmy-winning showrunner Rene Balcer (Law & Order) to sell a pilot to Starz. As a production company executive with a deal at CBS Network, she was on the team that sold multiple projects to CBS and The CW. She began her executive career at Universal Pictures, where she worked on films such as American Wedding, Curious George, The Good Shepherd (Matt Damon, Angelina Jolie, Robert DeNiro), The Fast & the Furious 3, Bridget Jones 2, The Cat in the Hat, Seabiscuit, and Red Dragon. Look for Regina’s comments in the Stage 32 Lounge.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a class?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Classes are typically 2 to 4 week ongoing broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online class, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the class.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the class software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The class software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live class. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live class?
A: If you cannot attend a live class and purchase an On-Demand class, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

Q: Will I have access to the class afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand class, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year!

Testimonials

Testimonials:

"Thanks for a wonderful class! Your efforts have been amazing." -Heather F.

"Great class, very helpful and useful information." -John R.

"Thank you for a great class filled with valuable info. I think the way you delivered the info seemed fresh and insightful. A few different slants to the way I see the same material made a difference. The point about ‘clean writing’ really resonated with me. I appreciate your ‘personal’ content in what to expect, your encouragement, etc. Thank you so very much." -Lynne L.

"I've just watched the recording in the UK and I have to say the content was brilliant! I learnt so much in that 2 hours, especially knowing you are the real deal. It makes the information so much more valuable to me." -David E.

"It was a great educational experience taking your class!" -Heather P.

"Regina offers great insight, [this class] instantly made me a better writer.” - David L.

"I just re-wrote my first five pages based on this class and Regina's incredibly insightful feedback, and wow! What a difference it made. This class is a "must take" Stage 32'ers!" - Shari F.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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