How to Write a 1 Hour TV Pilot and Position it to Sell it in Today's Market

Taught by Steve Iwanyk

$189

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Class hosted by: Steve Iwanyk

Producer at Tongal

Steve Iwanyk is a producer at Tongal and a former literary manager for The Gotham Group. Gotham is one of the largest entertainment management companies in the business representing writers, directors, producers, content creators, illustrators, authors, publishing houses, and artists for live action television and film, as well as new media, animation, family entertainment, and publishing. Steve has worked primarily in the television drama space, helping to oversee Gotham’s first-look producing deal with Legendary TV, but had clients working in features, as well as publishing, and previously worked with film & TV producer Gavin Polone, and in the Motion Picture Talent Department at the Creative Artists Agency. Full Bio »

Summary

Part 1 - Playing the Field

Steve discusses the kinds of 1 hour TV pilots networks are looking for, and more importantly, what kinds they are not. He talks about the differences between cable, network, and online (Netflix, Hulu, etc.) as well as the differences between procedurals and serialized series.

Part 2 - Character and Structure

Steve leads a discussion on characterization. He runs through some of his favorite TV characters and explores the development process most networks go through to amp up the characterization in scripts. He also explores supporting cast, archetypes, structure and act breaks.

Part 3 - Creating an Engine to Your Show

Steve discusses the engine of a TV show. He runs through the importance of a clear week-to-week and explores series longevity and how to craft story lines that can stretch out for 3-8 years.

 

What You'll Learn

"Steve is a really great instructor in that he conveys information really well - thorough, concise, clear." - Robbi C.

"I found the breakdown of different kinds of TV shows very helpful for my planning process, as well as the information on which different kinds of shows are sought, and why." - Barbarba C.

"Steve really gives you a sense of how the life of a writer is out there. A real eye opener. So helpful!" - Rodrigo A.

"Really appreciate seeing the CAA pitch guidelines. Very helpful!!" - Celeste W.

"Wow... so many variables in the TV world to explain. Steve did a magnificent job considering everything he had to cover." - Sylvia L. 

This is a 3 part class taught by producer and former literary manager Steve Iwanyk who sold his client's series, Scorpion, to CBS! Nearly all the executives we work with are on the hunt for 1 hour TV pilots. Venues showcasing TV series continue to pop up at a rapid pace and a lot of our writers have been signed off their 1 hour TV pilot script. As the demand for TV continues to rise it's important that you have a TV pilot in your portfolio that showcases your voice, perspective and talent. One of our favorite success stories is from one of our writers, Michael Madden, who had a solid 1 hour TV pilot which got him signed to Benderspink and ICM in Hollywood. Working with the Stage 32 Happy Writers helped catapult him to became a full time writer on ABC's Black Box.

Stage 32 Happy Writers is excited to bring you this 3 part class: How to Write a 1 Hour TV Pilot and Position it to Sell in Today's Market taught by Steve Iwanyk, a producer at Tongal and a former Manager at Gotham Group. Learn the “whys” and “hows” of writing a TV pilot, what executives are looking for and what to focus on when trying to break in with your new pilot.

 

Here's a sample of what to expect in this class:

 

 

Purchasing gives you access to the previously-recorded live class.
Steve is no longer sending out or reviewing the assignments, however we still encourage all creatives to participate in the exercises!

About Your Instructor

Steve Iwanyk is a producer at Tongal and a former literary manager for The Gotham Group. Gotham is one of the largest entertainment management companies in the business representing writers, directors, producers, content creators, illustrators, authors, publishing houses, and artists for live action television and film, as well as new media, animation, family entertainment, and publishing. Steve has worked primarily in the television drama space, helping to oversee Gotham’s first-look producing deal with Legendary TV, but had clients working in features, as well as publishing, and previously worked with film & TV producer Gavin Polone, and in the Motion Picture Talent Department at the Creative Artists Agency.

Testimonials

"Steve is a really great instructor in that he conveys information really well - thorough, concise, clear." - Robbi C.

"Steve really gives you a sense of how the life of a writer is out there. A real eye opener. So helpful!" - Rodrigo A.

"Really appreciate seeing the CAA pitch guidelines. Very helpful!!" - Celeste W.

"I find Steve's style, pace and information very sound in providing the information of the class." - Debbi O.

"Learned a ton of information. Thank you!" - Geno S.

"Steve was great. Very personable. Great presenter." - Gail D.

"Wow... so many variables in the TV world to explain. Steve did a magnificent job considering everything he had to cover." - Sylvia L.

"I found the breakdown of different kinds of TV shows very helpful for my planning process, as well as the information on which different kinds of shows are sought, and why." - Barbarba C.

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

  • Excellent class! Very thorough and well thought out/presented. The best webinar/class I've taken yet at Stage 32. This one is well worth every penny!
  • Quick and informative

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