Advanced Financing Webinar: How To Put Together A Recoupment Schedule For Your Film or TV Project

Hosted by David Zannoni

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David Zannoni

Webinar hosted by: David Zannoni

International Film Business Specialist at Fintage House

David Zannoni is an international business specialist for Fintage House in the US, Europe, Canada and Latin America territories. Fintage House, the world's most respected company for revenue and rights protection for industry professionals and companies. David negotiates agreements for films and television series and is involved in business development and relationship management globally on hundreds of productions. David is continuously present to make deals and speak at international film markets, festivals and conferences, including: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Europe, and all over Latin America.   Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

As creatives, we tend to focus on the writing, the directing, the creative producing, basically all the creating aspects of a film or television series. But it’s important to understand what happens after a film is released or TV series is aired. All those big box office numbers sound great, but who gets all that money and in what order? Who gets paid and in what order is called the “recoupment schedule” also known as “the waterfall.” It’s important to understand this schedule, so that you know your place in the waterfall.

Some people may find the recoupment schedule confusing, because there are several factors and various agreements that go into determining the order of recoupment. Those includes sales agency agreements, co-production agreements, finance agreements, talent agreements, interparty agreements, security agreements, and collection account management agreements. Plus there’s the consideration of domestic and international revenue, and what gets allocated through the waterfall. But if your head is already spinning, fret not. With the right guidance, all of this will make much more sense and David Zannoni is the best at breaking this down.

David Zannoni is an international business specialist for Fintage House in the US, Europe, Canada and Latin America territories. Fintage House, the world's most respected company for revenue and rights protection for industry professionals and companies. David negotiates agreements for films and television series and is involved in business development and relationship management globally on hundreds of productions. David is continuously present to make deals and speak at international film markets, festivals and conferences, including: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Europe, and all over Latin America.

David is going to help you understand the ins and outs of a recoupment schedule and how to make sure you are on top of your finances for your own project. He will first go into what exactly a recoupment schedule looks like and what kind of projects they are normally used for. He will delve into the agreements that recoupment schedule is based on. He will also go into how the payments are executed, how to determine the order of payments, and which funds you should be allocating. You’ll walk away with a solid foundation and understanding of “the waterfall” and where you may fall in the waterfall.

What You'll Learn

  • What is a Recoupment Schedule?
  • Who Puts Together the Recoupment Schedule?
  • Who Uses a Recoupment Schedule?
  • Which Projects have a Recoupment Schedule?
  • Agreements on which the Recoupment Schedule is Based
    • Sales Agency Agreement
    • Co-production Agreement
    • Finance Agreements
    • Talent Agreements
    • Interparty Agreement
    • Security Agreement
    • Collection Account Management Agreement
  • Which Payments are Done from the Recoupment Schedule?
    • Off the tops
    • Collection Account commission and expenses
    • Guild Residual payments
    • Sales Agent commission and expenses
    • Other costs and expenses
    • Financing
      • Debt financing
        • Production loans
        • Private loans
        • Senior, mezzanine, and junior debt
      • Equity financing
        • Private equity
        • Equity investors
        • Other financial contributions
    • Deferments
    • Box office bonuses
    • Profit participations
    • Other entitlements
  • How to Determine the Order of Payments from the Recoupment Schedule
  • How to Determine the Manner of Payments from the Recoupment Schedule
    • Pari passu payments – at the same time
    • Pro rata payments – in proportion to financial contribution
  • Which Funds are Allocated through the Recoupment Schedule
    • Revenues generated from distribution
      • Domestic distribution revenues
      • International distribution revenues
    • Surplus tax credit funds
    • Festival receipts
    • Merchandise receipts
    • Other sources of revenues
    • Multiple revenue streams
  • Q&A with David

About Your Instructor

David Zannoni is an international business specialist for Fintage House in the US, Europe, Canada and Latin America territories. Fintage House, the world's most respected company for revenue and rights protection for industry professionals and companies. David negotiates agreements for films and television series and is involved in business development and relationship management globally on hundreds of productions. David is continuously present to make deals and speak at international film markets, festivals and conferences, including: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Europe, and all over Latin America.

 

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How a CAM Account Saves You Time and Worry

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Navigating Collection Account Management For Your Independent Film or TV Project

If you’re an independent filmmaker or producer working to put together a film or TV project, you are likely going to have multiple producers, investors, financiers, sales agents, and talent that are will be looking to recoup profits on the completed project. This can get tricky. Not only do you have to keep your numbers and figures straight to properly reallocate your revenues, you also likely have to handle guild residuals, navigate liability issues and ensure every party is happy and trusting in the process. This can ultimately be a very messy process, and one that you should not handle on your own as the film’s producer. Instead, it’s probably time you have a collection account. A collection account is an account in the name of a neutral third party who receives revenues generated by an independent film or TV project on behalf of the multiple beneficiaries from local distributors. This process is called collection account management and is an effective tool to guarantee that the beneficiaries receive their share of the revenues. Collection account management is a massive time saver and a way to lower the chances of errors or improper payments. But it’s also the industry standard and something most parties and investors are going to expect you to have if they are considering moving forward. So how exactly does collection account management work and how can you best use this process to your advantage as an independent filmmaker? David Zannoni is an international business specialist for Fintage House in the US, Europe, Canada and Latin America territories. Fintage House, the world's most respected company for revenue and rights protection for industry professionals and companies. David negotiates agreements for films and television series and is involved in business development and relationship management globally on hundreds of productions. David is continuously present to make deals and speak at international film markets, festivals and conferences, including: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Europe, and all over Latin America. David will teach you how to navigate collection account management. He’ll begin by going into what exactly collection account management is and the different elements that go into it. He will also explain when to know if your production will need collection account management and delve into how this process affects your job as a producer, including liabilities, your relationship with your sales agent, and the rights and obligations with financiers, guilds, and talent. Next, David will demonstrate how collection account management works from a legal framework and the paperwork and contracts that go along with it, including the CAM Agreement. Finally, David will outline the benefits you will see as a producer when working with a collection account. He’ll even give specific tips for producers related to the CAM agreements, financiers, residuals, sales agents, and more. Collection account management can be a tricky process, but it’s also one that’s crucial to get right. David will show you how.     Praise for David's Previous Stage 32 Webinars   "David is incredible and lovely and clearly knows his stuff." - Cynthia P.   "Eye-opening information. A no-brainer approach that wouldn't be so obvious to the uninitiated." - Gary O.   "By far, the best class I've seen on the subject." Kirk K.   "David is a fantastic teacher. And what a voice! I could listen to him all day. More importantly, I learned so very much!" - Isabella T.

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