Anatomy of a Hollywood Movie Deal

7 Case Studies of Success
Hosted by Mitchell Peck

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Mitchell Peck

Webinar hosted by: Mitchell Peck

Producer

Producer Mitchell Peck has produced 3 studio movies with worldwide distribution — BIO-DOME (MGM), PRIEST (Sony) and CROOKED ARROWS (20th C Fox) — and made numerous studio script development deals, all based on screenplays he developed with first-time, unrepresented screenwriters. Mitchell currently has several movies in development, including: GAGARIN (2014 Academy Nicholl Finalist screenplay), which tells the story of the Space Race between the USA and the Soviet Union from the Soviet P.O.V.; THE CHINESE DELIVERY MAN (2014 Sundance Writer's Lab script), which takes an unflinching look at the Chinese immigrant experience in today's NYC; and CRUTCH a documentary about Bill "Crutch" Shannon, a disabled performer who went from breakdancing in underground competitions to choreographing for the Cirque Du Soleil. Mitchell recently decided to open a boutique screenplay consultancy, Hollywood Embassy (www.HollywoodEmbassy.com) -- to help serious, aspiring screenwriters develop and improve their scripts, professionally. Mitchell has become a sought-after Keynote Speaker and Panelist, and leads Producing-Screenwriting Master Classes at film festivals around the world -- including Africa, Europe, and America. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

Learn directly from Producer Mitchell Peck, who has produced 3 studio movies with worldwide distribution! 

Hollywood is a global aspiration. This year, 80+ countries submitted films for Academy Awards consideration. And the number of aspiring screenwriters is growing every year thanks to websites like Stage 32, and others. Tech and resource barriers to entry for filmmakers are being lowered, with DSLR's, iPhones, online distribution, social media, etc. Financing is easier than ever before, thanks to options like Slated, Indiegogo, Kickstarter, etc. Filmmaking is finally a democratic medium.

Yet, at the same time, Hollywood remains largely impenetrable -- and opaque -- to outsiders. Literary agencies, production companies and movie studios will not read "unsolicited submissions." Hollywood is an inefficient system; good material falls through the cracks all the time.

For 20 years in Hollywood as a movie producer, Producer Mitchell Peck has specialized in identifying material (scripts, books, articles, life-rights, etc.) and aspiring screenwriters from outside the Hollywood system -- and successfully guiding them into Hollywood's best literary agencies, top management-production companies, and major movie studios. (Check out some of Mitchell’s success stories on his website below). Few producers can boast the same track-record of success as Mitchell on behalf of aspiring screenwriters.

In this webinar, "Anatomy of a Hollywood Movie Deal: 7 Case Studies of Success with Producer Mitchell Peck” Mitchell will shed light on -- and hopefully demystify -- the process of successfully navigating the Hollywood marketplace by sharing highlights from seven (7) Hollywood movie deals in which he successfully guided aspiring screenwriters to top agency representation, script development deals, and-or produced studio movies with worldwide distribution.

What You'll Learn

Producer Mitchell Peck will share the highlights and lessons learned from seven (7) different Hollywood movie deals with aspiring screenwriters including:

  • How a script he developed that was rejected by every agency and management company, became the subject of a studio bidding war, and was eventually bought with an A-list director attached.
  • How a script he developed that was ignored/passed on by "thousands" of agents, managers, and executives became a Sundance Writer's Lab selection and got represented by a top 5 Hollywood agency.
  • How a script he developed that was rejected by all the studios, twice, got produced as an independent movie and was subsequently bought for domestic and international distribution by 2 of the studios that originally passed on it.
  • How a script he developed that was ignored/passed on for years recently became recognized as one of the top 10 "new" scripts in Hollywood, with dozens of Hollywood's best agencies and management companies now vying to represent it.
  • How a script he developed that was rejected by every major agency, except one, got bought in a studio bidding war and became the biggest movie the studio has ever made.

These case studies, and more, will shed light on how the Hollywood system works -- and how it can work for you.

About Your Instructor

Producer Mitchell Peck has produced 3 studio movies with worldwide distribution — BIO-DOME (MGM), PRIEST (Sony) and CROOKED ARROWS (20th C Fox) — and made numerous studio script development deals, all based on screenplays he developed with first-time, unrepresented screenwriters.

Mitchell currently has several movies in development, including: GAGARIN (2014 Academy Nicholl Finalist screenplay), which tells the story of the Space Race between the USA and the Soviet Union from the Soviet P.O.V.; THE CHINESE DELIVERY MAN (2014 Sundance Writer's Lab script), which takes an unflinching look at the Chinese immigrant experience in today's NYC; and CRUTCH a documentary about Bill "Crutch" Shannon, a disabled performer who went from breakdancing in underground competitions to choreographing for the Cirque Du Soleil.

Mitchell recently decided to open a boutique screenplay consultancy, Hollywood Embassy (www.HollywoodEmbassy.com) -- to help serious, aspiring screenwriters develop and improve their scripts, professionally.

Mitchell has become a sought-after Keynote Speaker and Panelist, and leads Producing-Screenwriting Master Classes at film festivals around the world -- including Africa, Europe, and America.

FAQs

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A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

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Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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