Demystifying the Agency World

Hosted by Morgan Long

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On Demand Webinar - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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Morgan Long

Webinar hosted by: Morgan Long

Coordinator in TV Literary at "Big Six" Agency

About Your Host Morgan Long, a coordinator at one of the big six Hollywood agencies: Morgan Long is a Coordinator in the TV literary department at one of the "Big Six" agencies in Hollywood. Morgan has a passion for development and loves assisting writers and creatives achieve personal and professional success in the fast-paced agency world. A native Texan, Morgan got her start in television at Televisa USA. While at Televisa USA Morgan worked in scripted development, where she worked closely with Lionsgate on shows like Devious Maids and Chasing Life. After years with Televisa USA, she moved to the representation side of the industry at one of the "Big Six" agencies in Hollywood. She and her department represent TV writers, directors, and non-writing producers. Full Bio »

Learn directly from Morgan Long, a coordinator from one of the big six Hollywood agencies in the TV literary department! She'll give you specific insider knowledge of the agency system and what it takes to get their attention.

There is a cloud of mystery surrounding one of the biggest and most fundamental components of the Hollywood industry – and that’s the agency. Whether you’re a writer, director, non-writing producer, actor – and the list goes on to cover even the most obscure type of talent imaginable– it’s pretty basic knowledge that representation is necessary to launch your career.

In this jam-packed Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, Demystifying the Agency World, Morgan will take you inside the walls of a premier Hollywood agency to shed light on the inner workings of how deals get made, how agents think and ultimately, how you can take steps in your career towards securing the holy grail that is representation.

You will leave the webinar knowing:

  • The types of representation
  • The different departments within an agency and how they work together and function independently.
  • The types of jobs for TV clients
  • Identify the players we sell to
  • What sells in the marketplace?
  • What is packaging?
  • An agent's day-to-day
  • What agents want in potential clients (the brutal, honest answer)
  • Finding representation
  • Moving forward without representation.

What You'll Learn:

What You Will Learn:

  • The types of representation
    • Agents
    • Managers
    • Attorneys
  • The different departments within an agency and how they work together and function independently.
    • Focus on TV Lit
  • The types of jobs for TV clients
    • Writers
    • Staffing
    • Development (crossover with features)
    • Directors
    • Pilots
    • Episodic
    • Non-writing Producers
    • Development
  • Identify the players we sell to
    • Producers
    • Studios
    • Networks
  • What sells in the marketplace?
    • Advice on staying current and relevant.
    • How to be one step ahead of the trends.
    • Importance of IP
    • Importance of international market
    • Importance of knowing your niche
  • What is packaging?
    • Review how departments work together.
    • Define packaging and why this benefits you in some cases
    • Some agents are specifically packaging agents
  • An agent's day-to-day
    • Outline staff meetings here and how we work for our clients
  • What agents want in potential clients (the brutal, honest answer)
    • More bang for their buck
    • Current credits
    • Pre-established connections
    • Diversity
    • Women
    • Talent
    • (Unfortunately in that order)
  • Finding representation
    • Let's review the types and what you actually need
    • Connections
    • How helpful are query letters? (only some management companies actually find clients through these -- ex: Circle of Confusion)
  • Moving forward without representation.
    • contests that get agents' attention
    • the importance of being local
    • continuing to hone your craft

LIVE, in-depth Q&A with Morgan - bring all your questions!


About Your Instructor:

About Your Host Morgan Long, a coordinator at one of the big six Hollywood agencies:

Morgan Long is a Coordinator in the TV literary department at one of the "Big Six" agencies in Hollywood. Morgan has a passion for development and loves assisting writers and creatives achieve personal and professional success in the fast-paced agency world. A native Texan, Morgan got her start in television at Televisa USA. While at Televisa USA Morgan worked in scripted development, where she worked closely with Lionsgate on shows like Devious Maids and Chasing Life. After years with Televisa USA, she moved to the representation side of the industry at one of the "Big Six" agencies in Hollywood. She and her department represent TV writers, directors, and non-writing producers.


Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 5 out of 5

  • I feel much more prepared in approaching agencies and understanding the system itself. I have a clearer picture of the process and the expectations.
  • Morgan was very warm and friendly in her execution of the material and is a wealth of knowledge. A great webinar taught by a great person!

Other education that may be of interest to you:

8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab

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8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab

Learn directly from Morgan Long, TV Literary Department for a “Big Six” Agency This lab is designed for beginner and intermediate screenwriters looking to build a pilot from scratch or expand on an existing idea. With the TV market exploding right now, one of the most in demand formats is the 1-hour TV drama pilot. Many, if not all, managers and agents are looking for writers that can write in this space, and with more and more production companies heading into TV, knowing how to write a strong 1-hour TV drama pilot will give you a competitive advantage and help you find success as a TV writer! Due to popular demand, Stage 32 is thrilled to bring back our 8 Week Intensive TV Drama Pilot Writing Lab taught by Morgan Long, a TV development coordinator at a “Big Six” Agency! This hands-on intensive lab will guide you through picking a concept, creating engaging characters, structuring and outlining your pilot and writing the first draft! The main objective of this 8-week lab will be to have a first draft of your script. You will meet online with Morgan for 2 hours a week in a class setting, plus have phone consultations during some of the weeks when you don't have an online class. This will be accompanied by weekly homework assignments to guide you on your way to creating a marketable, unique pilot that will grab the industry's attention. Payment plans are available - please contact julie@stage32.com for more information.  This Lab is Limited to 20 People. Please Note: Participating in this lab does not mean you are writing for or pitching to Morgan or her company.  PRE-CLASS PREP - Read your syllabus and plan out your writing ideas. Begin to think about 1-2 ideas that might be a good idea for your drama pilot. Start to prepare for your pilot pitch.

How To Find Distribution For Your Indie Film

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The Do's and Don'ts of Landing a Manager or Agent

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