Plan Your Film Festival Strategy in the "New Normal" - Virtual Film Festivals and Beyond

Hosted by Kimberley Browning

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Kimberley Browning

Webinar hosted by: Kimberley Browning

Assoc. Short Film Programmer - Tribeca, EP of HBO Access Directors Fellowship, Founder -Hollywood Shorts

Kimberley Browning is an independent filmmaker, the Associate Short Film Programmer at the Tribeca Film Festival and the founder of the long-running short film screening series Hollywood Shorts. Kimberley is also the Executive Producer of HBO ACCESS Directors Fellowship, the network's program developing and launching underrepresented voices into episodic television. Formerly a short film programmer for both the Los Angeles Film Festival and Guadalajara International Film Festival Los Angeles, Kimberley has a long history of working with film festivals and continues to serve as a festival consultant for many independent filmmakers. Kimberley has built her storied career around elevating new voices and empowering them to get their projects out into the world. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

The backbone of the entertainment industry was shaken to the core after the trades announced one of the major festivals - SXSW was going to cancel its in-person festival. Shortly after festival after festival had to adapt to a new way of doing things - should they present their festival live and take a chance of it being cancelled? Or, should they present their festival virtually bringing on a new slew of challenges? Navigating this "new normal" has rocked the industry and has left many filmmakers scratching their heads about what it all means. Should you release your film in this new format? Or should you hold onto it and wait it out, with the fear of another year going by without it seeing the light of day?

Despite the ongoing shift to a virtual, watch-from-home and hybrid model, film festivals continue to serve as an important platform for your film to make its debut. Your film can continue to find attention, distribution and other successes from participating, yet there are new questions and considerations you should factor into evaluating which festivals to submit to. The current spirit of cooperation and collaboration between festivals during the pandemic has radically changed, creating lots of new and exciting ways you can benefit from the circuit. But, with the excitement, there is also a lot of confusion about premiere status, virtual screenings vs online screenings, and more. Outside of getting your film into a festival, there are things you can learn from what the successful festival films are seeing that you can apply to your own film and its release. Whether you are a feature filmmaker or a short filmmaker you need to understand and embrace the new practices emerging among festivals presenting virtual and hybrid events. It’s time you take stock of the situation.

Kimberley Browning is an independent filmmaker, the Associate Short Film Programmer at the Tribeca Film Festival and the founder of the long-running short film screening series Hollywood Shorts. Kimberley is also the Executive Producer of HBO ACCESS Directors Fellowship, the network's program developing and launching underrepresented voices into episodic television. Formerly a short film programmer for both the Los Angeles Film Festival and Guadalajara International Film Festival Los Angeles, Kimberley has a long history of working with film festivals and continues to serve as a festival consultant for many independent filmmakers. Kimberley has built her storied career around elevating new voices and empowering them to get their projects out into the world.

Kimberley will delve into how filmmakers are finding success with their new films during the pandemic and how you can use film festivals as well as other practices to successfully release your own short or feature film. She’ll begin by explaining how you should be setting your gals and building your strategies to get your film out there. She’ll talk about new practices to build an audience, strategy essentials—with or without COVID—and how you should now be defining success and whether it needs to evolve due to the pandemic. Next Kimberley will focus on film festivals and show you what the new festival landscape and vocabulary looks like. She’ll explain what the best digital platforms festivals are utilizing and which to avoid. She’ll also teach you what ‘geocaching’ is and how to determine your geofencing options. She will go over DRM protections and how to keep your film safe when screening virtually and will talk about the difference between virtual screenings and online screenings. Next Kimberley will delve into the new film festival calendar, how the overall festival circuit is shifting due to date changes and postponements. She’ll give you the rundown of how to read small print before submitting to festivals to make sure you know what you need to know ahead of time. She’ll walk through how you should revamp your festival strategy to better navigate COVID and how you should now be communicating with a festival team. Kimberley will also talk about how to now navigate premiere status with festivals and explain how virtual festivals impact your film’s status and its ability to get distributor attention. She’ll also talk about how media and distributors are now navigating new rules in 2020 to find work with films. Next she will teach you how to navigate a virtual festival if your film is accepted, including how to promote your film to a virtual audience and how to build relationships and make connections without in-person events. Beyond festivals, Kimberley will give you strategies to promote and market your film to a general audience for its virtual release including if and how to work with publicists and new social media strategies to start employing. Kimberley will talk about other release strategies for your film beyond film festivals. She’ll give you tips on how to host your own independent online premiere. She’ll also give you a rundown of how to find distributors in a distanced world and how to operate long-standing marketplaces like AFM that are now turning virtual. Finally Kimberley will go over ways to self-distribute your film during quarantine, including if and how to work with aggregators to maximize your release. This is a tough time to release your film—rules and practices have changed across the board—but it’s still possible to find success and Kimberley will show you how to achieve this with your own film.

 

 

"The traditional paths to getting attention for our films has been drastically changing in recent years, and now the pandemic has upended everything. It is so important for filmmakers to stay encouraged and innovative in getting our work out to the world right now. Let's explore how to build and nurture audiences for our films during these challenging times."

-Kimberley Browning

What You'll Learn

  • New Release Goals and Strategy
    • Building an audience
    • Strategy essentials
    • What is your definition of success? Does it need to evolve during the pandemic’s impact on the film industry?
  • The New Film Festival Vocabulary
    • What are the best digital platforms festivals are utilizing? Which to avoid?
    • What is Geocaching and how to determine your geofencing options
    • Learn about DRM protection
    • Virtual screening vs online screening - using the right terminology
  • The New Film Festival Calendar
    • How the film festival circuit dates and postponements impact your strategy
    • Reading the small print when submitting to festivals
    • Revamping your festival strategy during COVID
    • Communicating with the festival team
  • Premiere Status - Now What Do We Do?
    • The premiere status - what is best for my film?
    • How do virtual festivals impact premiere status of my film and getting distribution attention?
    • How are media and distributors navigating the new rules in 2020
  • How Accepted Filmmakers Should Navigate a Virtual Festival
    • Tips and insight on new techniques to maximize the virtual festival experience
    • How to promote your film to a festival audience
    • Building relationships at a virtual festival
  • Promoting and Marketing Your Film
    • The eternal questions about publicists
    • Social media strategies
  • Finding Success For Your Film in the Pandemic Beyond Festivals
    • Hosting your own online premiere
    • Finding distributors in a distanced world
      • The state of long-standing marketplaces like AFM
      • How virtual marketplaces are working
    • Navigating self-distribution during quarantine
      • Are aggregators worth it? Which ones?
  • Q&A with Kimberley

About Your Instructor

Kimberley Browning is an independent filmmaker, the Associate Short Film Programmer at the Tribeca Film Festival and the founder of the long-running short film screening series Hollywood Shorts. Kimberley is also the Executive Producer of HBO ACCESS Directors Fellowship, the network's program developing and launching underrepresented voices into episodic television. Formerly a short film programmer for both the Los Angeles Film Festival and Guadalajara International Film Festival Los Angeles, Kimberley has a long history of working with film festivals and continues to serve as a festival consultant for many independent filmmakers. Kimberley has built her storied career around elevating new voices and empowering them to get their projects out into the world.

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