How To Recoup Your Film's Profits Through Collection Account Management

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Hosted by David Zannoni

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David Zannoni

Webinar hosted by: David Zannoni

International Film Business Specialist at Fintage House

David is consultant for Fintage House and is the company's representative for the Americas. For Fintage David negotiates agreements for films and television series, and he is involved in business development and relationship management specifically in the US, Latin America and Spain. On behalf of Fintage House, David has given presentations, workshops and seminars at universities across the globe and at events such as the yearly conference of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers in the US (NALIP), the Winston Baker Film Finance Conferences, the Rio Film Market and the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM). David runs his consultancy business through Xaman Ha Consulting and Zannoni Media Advisors, and has been focusing particularly on international service providers in the film and TV industries, and film and TV productions in Latin America, amongst others. A Dutch-Italian citizen, David is fluent in English, Spanish, Dutch and Italian, and is basic in German. He has been living in Mexico for the last five years. As a film business specialist David is continuously present at international film markets, festivals and conferences, amongst others: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Spain, and all over Latin America. Full Bio »

Nowadays many independent film and TV productions that have multiple parties involved are looking for the best way to recoup profits on a completed project. One of the best ways to assure the parties involved with your film (producers, investors, financiers, sales agents and talent) see their returns is to have a collection account in place. 

A collection account is an account in the name of a neutral third party who receives revenues generated by an independent film or TV project on behalf of the multiple beneficiaries from local distributors. This process is called collection account management and is an effective tool to guarantee that the beneficiaries receive their share of the revenues.

The beneficiaries include producers, investors, financiers, sales agents and talent. Often times financiers, production partners and international sales agents put a collection account up as a requirement before even boarding project.

During this webinar we will explain the functions and benefits of having a collection account in place for an independent film or TV project, how collection account management is set up and which parties should be involved in the entire process.

We will further discuss the allocation and distribution of revenues, how to put together the Recoupment Schedule, and the importance of signing, or being a beneficiary to, the Collection Account Management Agreement.


What You'll Learn:

- The purpose of having a Collection Account in place for your film or TV project

- Who engages the collection account manager (CAM)?

- The relationship between producers, sales agent, financiers and CAM

- Receipt, allocation and disbursement of revenues generated from distribution agreements

- Which are the risks of film production, financing and distribution without a Collection Account?

- How does Collection Account Management eliminate or reduce these risks?

- How does Collection Account Management work?

- The Recoupment Schedule explained

- The Collection Account Management Agreement (CAMA): a multi-party agreement

- Which parties sign the CAMA?

- Kind of projects that typically engage a CAM

- How you, your production partners and your investors benefit of having a Collection Account in place for your project

- How Collection Account Management can be of help to get your film or TV project together

Q&A With David!

 


About Your Instructor:

David is consultant for Fintage House and is the company's representative for the Americas. For Fintage David negotiates agreements for films and television series, and he is involved in business development and relationship management specifically in the US, Latin America and Spain.

On behalf of Fintage House, David has given presentations, workshops and seminars at universities across the globe and at events such as the yearly conference of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers in the US (NALIP), the Winston Baker Film Finance Conferences, the Rio Film Market and the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM).

David runs his consultancy business through Xaman Ha Consulting and Zannoni Media Advisors, and has been focusing particularly on international service providers in the film and TV industries, and film and TV productions in Latin America, amongst others.

A Dutch-Italian citizen, David is fluent in English, Spanish, Dutch and Italian, and is basic in German. He has been living in Mexico for the last five years.

As a film business specialist David is continuously present at international film markets, festivals and conferences, amongst others: the Cannes Film Festival, the European Film Market (EFM) in Berlin, the American Film Market (AFM), Ventana Sur, the Bogota Audiovisual Market (BAM), and the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and travels regularly to the United States, the Netherlands, Spain, and all over Latin America.


Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: What is the format of a webinar?
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

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A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A.

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