Capturing "The Room" - How to Win in the Crucial Meeting

(In-Person and Online)
Hosted by Jeff Portnoy

$49

On Demand Webinar - For immediate download. Unlimited access for 1 year.

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Jeff Portnoy

Webinar hosted by: Jeff Portnoy

Manager at Bellevue Productions

Jeff is a Literary Manager at Bellevue Productions. Formerly, he worked as a Literary manager for Herectic Literary Management and was the Head of the Story Department at Resolution, the full-service talent agency founded by Jeff Berg (former Chairman of ICM), and whose clients include director Roman Polanski and filmmakers Nick Cassavetes, John Milius, and Julie Taymor. In addition to his former duties at Resolution, Jeff serves as an agent on several client teams scouting for potential clients and also judges TV and feature screenwriting competitions. Prior to joining Resolution, Jeff was with Creative Artists Agency for 6 years as a full-time staff story analyst, evaluating teleplays, screenplays, books and other literary materials set up at major production companies, networks and studios and writing development notes for client projects. He then moved to The Gotham Group in the executive office and gained experience learning about management and production before he moved to Resolution. Jeff holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film Production from Point Park University in Pittsburgh, PA. Full Bio »

Learn directly from Bellevue Literary Manager Jeff Portnoy, formerly from Heretic, CAA and Resolution!

Whether you’re behind the scenes as a writer, director or cinematographer, or in front of the camera as an actor, being great at what you do is only part of being successful. Knowing and honing your craft is only the FIRST step toward working in the industry or continuing to move into different disciplines in the industry.

The second step is impressing managers, agents and executives in meetings, whether they are in person or (in today’s new technological world) online.

So, what happens when you finally land that crucial meeting? The one that could take you to the next level?

Stage 32 Next Level Webinars is excited to present Capturing "The Room" How to Win in the Crucial Meeting (in person and online) presented by Jeff Portnoy, Literary Manager at Bellevue Productions. 

Jeff will discuss the dynamics of industry meetings and you will learn valuable tips that can help you stand out from the crowd. From simple things like understanding eye contact to more advanced things, such as some secret pitch tips for the room so you will feel more comfortable, he will discuss all aspects of a typical “meeting”.

Jeff has worked with many writers over his career, but this webinar will be geared towards all crafts and apply to multiple disciplines.


What You'll Learn:

  • Eye Contact: understand how this works, when it's important to have eye contact and when you should look away.
  • Dress Code and Physical Appearance: why it matters, what it says about you and what to wear to a meeting.
  • Sounding Natural: understanding preparation for the meeting and how to incorporate it seamlessly.
  • Passion, Charisma and Energy: why is this important? Can it ever be too much?
  • Is less more?: understanding how and when to talk and discussing dominating conversations.
  • How to consider other people’s ideas/ criticism / overall attitude
  • Humor and Likeability
  • Biography: How to use your past to stand out from the pack - pertinent educational, sociological and professional information. What are managers looking to know about you? 
  • Research: understanding the types of research you should do on the person you're meeting with.
  • Support Staff: understanding their role.
  • Meeting Types: There are different types of meetings, i.e. General, Specific, and Interview. We will briefly discuss the differences between these meetings and how to prepare for each.

About Your Instructor:

Jeff is a Literary Manager at Bellevue Productions. Formerly, he worked as a Literary manager for Herectic Literary Management and was the Head of the Story Department at Resolution, the full-service talent agency founded by Jeff Berg (former Chairman of ICM), and whose clients include director Roman Polanski and filmmakers Nick Cassavetes, John Milius, and Julie Taymor. In addition to his former duties at Resolution, Jeff serves as an agent on several client teams scouting for potential clients and also judges TV and feature screenwriting competitions.

Prior to joining Resolution, Jeff was with Creative Artists Agency for 6 years as a full-time staff story analyst, evaluating teleplays, screenplays, books and other literary materials set up at major production companies, networks and studios and writing development notes for client projects. He then moved to The Gotham Group in the executive office and gained experience learning about management and production before he moved to Resolution. Jeff holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film Production from Point Park University in Pittsburgh, PA.


Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.
 

Reviews Average Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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