How to Find & Adapt Comic Book, Video Game, Book & Article IP for Film & TV

Hosted by Maggie Lane

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Maggie Lane

Webinar hosted by: Maggie Lane

Producer

Maggie Lane has nearly a decade of development experience. After graduating from Columbia University, she moved to Los Angeles where she worked for The Jim Henson Company, Warner Bros. and FOX. From 2013 until early 2016, she served as the Development Coordinator for Pukeko Pictures (Weta Workshop’s production division). Based in New Zealand, Weta is best known for LORD OF THE RINGS, THE HOBBIT, AVATAR and DISTRICT 9. Currently, Maggie is working as an Independent Producer developing film and television for several genre-focused companies. She also produces and develops cinematic VR, graphic novels and interactive experiences. She is a member of Next Gen Femmes. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

  • State of the industry
    • Why the majority of TV/Film comes from pre-existing IP
    • "The Executive Bias"
    • Pre-existing Fan Base/Fleshed Out World
  • Adapting Books/Articles
    • Where to Go!
    • How To Choose Material
    • Who To Contact For Film/TV Rights
    • How To Close The Deal
    • Case Study: Game of Thrones, Sex and The City
    • Case Study: The Wedding Sting in the Atlantic, now going to be a film at Paramount
  • Adapting Comic Books / Video Games
    • Where to Go!
    • How To Choose Material
    • Who To Contact For Film/TV Rights
    • How To Close The Deal
    • Case Study (Comics): Guardians of the Galaxy (Marvel/Disney, lesser known/less successful comic became a blockbuster)
    • Case Study: Jessica Jones (Marvel / Netflix)
    • Case Study (Video Games): Assassin's Creed (FOX, to be released this December)
  • Making it your own
    • Most say DO NOT adapt your own material (leads to being too protective of your work/not as open to change)
    • Fun thing about IP, when you build a world, it can keep being adapted into other mediums (Example: Orphan Black the comic book was one of the best-selling comics last year, adapted from TV show. Goes in both directions)
    • The heart of this, however, is making sure the new versions are different enough from the old, AND have your voice in them.

LIVE Q&A with Maggie!

What You'll Learn

Learn directly from Maggie Lane, producer and development executive who's worked for The Jim Henson Company, Warner Bros. and FOX as she shares her knowledge of finding IP to adapt for TV and/or Film.

In the past ten years, the majority of television shows and films bought by studios have come from pre-existing IP (Intellectual Property). Some quote the figure to be as high as 65%.

The reason for this makes sense on many levels --- especially the comfort for executives in knowing that the story they are investing in has a clear backbone, and hopefully a legion of fans. But for the majority of independent filmmakers and producers, you are not looking to adapt a New York Times Best Seller for a multi-figure deal, you're looking to find an existing story on a smaller scale that speaks to you.

In this exclusive Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, producer & executive Maggie Lane will discuss the main areas of fantasy & sci-fi adaptation: books, articles, comic books & video games. She'll guide you through the importance of adapting IP with your spin to make it your own.

You'll walk away knowing how to find that magical property; the book, graphic novel, article or video game on which to base a film or TV series. And, you'll know how to use it as a jumping off point to showcase your talents as a storyteller.

About Your Instructor

Maggie Lane has nearly a decade of development experience. After graduating from Columbia University, she moved to Los Angeles where she worked for The Jim Henson Company, Warner Bros. and FOX. From 2013 until early 2016, she served as the Development Coordinator for Pukeko Pictures (Weta Workshop’s production division). Based in New Zealand, Weta is best known for LORD OF THE RINGS, THE HOBBIT, AVATAR and DISTRICT 9. Currently, Maggie is working as an Independent Producer developing film and television for several genre-focused companies. She also produces and develops cinematic VR, graphic novels and interactive experiences. She is a member of Next Gen Femmes.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

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