How to Find & Adapt Comic Book, Video Game, Book & Article IP for Film & TV

Hosted by Maggie Lane

N/A
On-demand coming soon
We're in the process of converting this LIVE webinar into the video for on-demand viewing. Please come back soon.

Registration

ON-DEMAND COMING SOON!

This webinar had a live screening session recently and has not yet been converted into a video format.

Stage 32 Next Level Education has a 97% user satisfaction rate.

Maggie Lane

Webinar hosted by: Maggie Lane

Producer

Maggie Lane has nearly a decade of development experience. After graduating from Columbia University, she moved to Los Angeles where she worked for The Jim Henson Company, Warner Bros. and FOX. From 2013 until early 2016, she served as the Development Coordinator for Pukeko Pictures (Weta Workshop’s production division). Based in New Zealand, Weta is best known for LORD OF THE RINGS, THE HOBBIT, AVATAR and DISTRICT 9. Currently, Maggie is working as an Independent Producer developing film and television for several genre-focused companies. She also produces and develops cinematic VR, graphic novels and interactive experiences. She is a member of Next Gen Femmes. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

  • State of the industry
    • Why the majority of TV/Film comes from pre-existing IP
    • "The Executive Bias"
    • Pre-existing Fan Base/Fleshed Out World
  • Adapting Books/Articles
    • Where to Go!
    • How To Choose Material
    • Who To Contact For Film/TV Rights
    • How To Close The Deal
    • Case Study: Game of Thrones, Sex and The City
    • Case Study: The Wedding Sting in the Atlantic, now going to be a film at Paramount
  • Adapting Comic Books / Video Games
    • Where to Go!
    • How To Choose Material
    • Who To Contact For Film/TV Rights
    • How To Close The Deal
    • Case Study (Comics): Guardians of the Galaxy (Marvel/Disney, lesser known/less successful comic became a blockbuster)
    • Case Study: Jessica Jones (Marvel / Netflix)
    • Case Study (Video Games): Assassin's Creed (FOX, to be released this December)
  • Making it your own
    • Most say DO NOT adapt your own material (leads to being too protective of your work/not as open to change)
    • Fun thing about IP, when you build a world, it can keep being adapted into other mediums (Example: Orphan Black the comic book was one of the best-selling comics last year, adapted from TV show. Goes in both directions)
    • The heart of this, however, is making sure the new versions are different enough from the old, AND have your voice in them.

LIVE Q&A with Maggie!

What You'll Learn

Learn directly from Maggie Lane, producer and development executive who's worked for The Jim Henson Company, Warner Bros. and FOX as she shares her knowledge of finding IP to adapt for TV and/or Film.

In the past ten years, the majority of television shows and films bought by studios have come from pre-existing IP (Intellectual Property). Some quote the figure to be as high as 65%.

The reason for this makes sense on many levels --- especially the comfort for executives in knowing that the story they are investing in has a clear backbone, and hopefully a legion of fans. But for the majority of independent filmmakers and producers, you are not looking to adapt a New York Times Best Seller for a multi-figure deal, you're looking to find an existing story on a smaller scale that speaks to you.

In this exclusive Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, producer & executive Maggie Lane will discuss the main areas of fantasy & sci-fi adaptation: books, articles, comic books & video games. She'll guide you through the importance of adapting IP with your spin to make it your own.

You'll walk away knowing how to find that magical property; the book, graphic novel, article or video game on which to base a film or TV series. And, you'll know how to use it as a jumping off point to showcase your talents as a storyteller.

About Your Instructor

Maggie Lane has nearly a decade of development experience. After graduating from Columbia University, she moved to Los Angeles where she worked for The Jim Henson Company, Warner Bros. and FOX. From 2013 until early 2016, she served as the Development Coordinator for Pukeko Pictures (Weta Workshop’s production division). Based in New Zealand, Weta is best known for LORD OF THE RINGS, THE HOBBIT, AVATAR and DISTRICT 9. Currently, Maggie is working as an Independent Producer developing film and television for several genre-focused companies. She also produces and develops cinematic VR, graphic novels and interactive experiences. She is a member of Next Gen Femmes.

FAQs

Q: What is the format of a webinar? 
A: Stage 32 Next Level Webinars are typically 90-minute broadcasts that take place online using a designated software program from Stage 32.

Q: Do I have to be located in a specific location?
A: No, you can participate from the comfort of your own home using your personal computer! If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar.

Q: What are the system requirements?
A: You will need to meet the following system requirements in order to run the webinar software: Windows 7 or later Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks) or later.
If you have Windows XP, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion): The webinar software does not support these operating systems. If you are running one of those operating systems, please upgrade now in order to be able to view a live webinar. Upgrade your Windows computer / Upgrade your Mac computer 

Q: What if I cannot attend the live webinar?
A: If you attend a live online webinar, you will be able to communicate directly with your instructor during the webinar. If you cannot attend a live webinar and purchase an On-Demand webinar, you will have access to the entire recorded broadcast, including the Q&A. 

Q: Will I have access to the webinar afterward to rewatch?
A: Yes! After the purchase of a live or On-Demand webinar, you will have on-demand access to the audio recording, which you can view as many times as you'd like for a whole year! 

Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

Other education that may be of interest to you:

How to Handle Notes on Your Script: Types of Notes and What They Mean

“I have some notes” is perhaps the most dreaded phrase writers hear. “Here it comes… they want to change everything; they want to destroy my masterpiece!” And yet, you the writer, asked for these notes. “They read and they didn’t pass! They want to work with me!” Or, “they read – and yeah, they’re right, I need to rethink this, it will be better if I change it.” Film and television are the ultimate collaborative medium. You write alone (or in a team), but to make the final product, the work of dozens to hundreds of people is required, and they all have some contribution to make. And the work is a product to be sold to buyers and an audience, and they get a say in what they want to purchase and consume. Screenwriting is also the ultimate iterative process. No script is ever perfect on the first draft, and scripts evolve and grow even during production itself. So you will be receiving notes – lots and lots and lots of them. Some you will ask for, perhaps pay for: notes from other writers, professional consultants, managers and agents. Some you will hope for: producers, executives, directors and stars. Some you will agree to: showrunners, studio and network executives. And some will remind you that necessity is the mother of invention: from line producers, casting directors, set dressers, and costume designers. But what should you do with those notes? How to take the sting and how to accept them as a gift? How to think about executing them when you agree, and what to do when you don’t? And most importantly, what do all those terms mean? Some of them sound like some sort of spy code: expo dump, let it breathe, contrived, mining, building, leaning, rules of the universe, on the nose and come in later – say what? In this webinar we will pull back the curtain on the notes process, discuss how to take notes, how to begin to address them, and what notegivers really mean by all those terms.

Beyond The Page: The Business Side of Breaking In & Getting Work as a Screenwriter

Learn directly from Michael Poisson, the former Director of Development at Silent Machine Entertainment, Krysten Ritter’s production company that has a first look deal at Universal TV. Michael is also a comedy writer who used his insider knowledge to land a manager, and get two projects in development at TV production companies. In this Stage 32 Next Level Webinar, your host Michael Poisson will guide you through the business side of how to become a working writer in Hollywood. Writing an awesome script is only part of the process for becoming successful in this industry. Having worked on various projects from both the executive side, as well as the writer side of things, Michael has obtained great insight for how to avoid the difficult terrain when meeting and working with producers, studios, and networks. And while the process of finding a manager or agent is daunting, keeping a strong relationship with them so that they’re doing the most for you as their client can be equally difficult. Michael will share with you his insider knowledge to help: keep your writing on track, your meetings fruitful, and your industry contacts strong. If you’ve ever wondered what you should talk about in “general meetings”, how to take notes from friends/producers/execs that you don’t agree with, or how to be a more prolific writer, this webinar is for you!  

The Breakdown Webcast: Antiheroes

We're kicking off the first Writers' Room of 2020 with a deep dive into antiheroes - one of the most difficult character types to write. During this supersized 90 minute webcast, Director of Script Services, Jason Mirch explores the complexities of characters from some of our favorite films and television series including Joker, Kill Bill, The Social Network, The Irishman, "Fleabag", "The Sopranos", "Sherlock" and more to find out what makes them tick...and why we love them.  We discuss the how screenwriters craft compelling antiheroes and I will give you specific types of antiheroes to consider when writing as well as tips on how to write them!

Independent Film Acquisitions – the US Theatrical Market

With more and more content being created, the theatrical distribution market is changing. But, there still IS an opportunity for a film to be distributed to the US market in theaters. We've brought in veteran acquisitions executive, Jason Resnick, from Aviron Pictures to talk about what makes an independent film stand out for theatrical distribution in today's market. Jason was formerly the GM of Worldwide Acquisitions for the Universal Pictures Group and in charge of all acquisitions for Universal, Focus Features, Rogue Pictures and Universal Home Entertainment. Now, he'll go over what the US theatrical market looks like for film acquisitions. And, it's more accessible than you think! 

How to Direct for Animated Television

Exclusive to Stage 32! Netflix animation director Mike Disa teaches how to direct for animated television!   "Mike Disa was amazingly generous with his time and information. And he was real. It doesn't get better than that. I'll be able to apply his insights and the information he shared immediately. I'm so glad I decided to participate." - Elizabeth A. "The webinar was excellent and very well paced. I truly appreciated the honesty and straightforwardness of the presenter. I learned a lot and look forward to the next one." - Jerry M. "Great information, Mike did an awesome job and I will look forward to his next webinar." - Diane M. "Really appreciated Mike's enthusiasm!" - Kate D. "Excellent webinar. I think that I learned more than I expected to about animation and how it relates to working in the industry. I had a good time watching this and appreciate how kind everyone was with their time." - Kari H.   Directing for animated television shows requires a special skillset that can’t be taught in school. Top animated shows like The Simpsons, Bob’s Burgers, Bojak Horseman, American Dad succeed because of the top directing talent at the helm. To help you on your journey directing for animation we've brought in Director Mike Disa of the Netflix Show Paradise PD to break down in detail what it takes. With no film training or knowledge of the byzantine workings of the entertainment business, he eventually found success at studios such as Dreamworks, Disney Feature, Warner Brothers, Paramount, and many others. Over a fascinating career, Mike has worked with some of the greatest and most infamous people in Hollywood including Steven Spielberg, Eric Goldberg, Ralph Bakshi, Glenn Close, Steve Oedekerk, David Tennant, Amy Poehler, Adam Sandler, Jeffery Katzenberg and Roy Disney. He'll be going over the overall landscape and the details of what it takes to write for both features and TV. If you’ve missed Mike Disa’s epic 1st part about Writing for Animation webinar, click here. Some of Mike's previous webinar testimonials: "The stories and ideas and descriptions were excellent. Straight talk from a true professional." - Don S. "Mike Disa was amazingly generous with his time and information. And he was real. It doesn't get better than that. I'll be able to apply his insights and the information he shared immediately. I'm so glad I decided to participate." - Elizabeth A. "This was really helpful. Thank you for examples of scripts to download to read. This was very helpful." - Robin L.

The Pitch Tank: Screenwriter Sam Alper

In this Pitch Tank we welcome screenwriter Sam Alper from FX's "Better Things" and the new AMC series, "Kevin Can F*** Himself" to critique television pitches from Writers' Room members. Sam gives excellent insights from the perspective of a working screenwriter who has worked in professional writing rooms with some of the industry's leading show runners and writers. 

register for stage 32 Register / Log In