International Co-Productions: Picking the Right Partners, Funds & Strategy for Success

Hosted by Birgit Kemner

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Birgit Kemner

Webinar hosted by: Birgit Kemner

Producer (Cannes, Venice, Tribeca) at Manny Films

Birgit Kemner is a French-German producer who has headed up successful co-productions for nearly a decade. All of her productions have been selected and awarded in renowned festivals such as the Cannes, Tribeca or Venice Film Festival. Birgit was previously Head of Marketing and Festivals at the MK2 group and has worked on international releases of over 50 films directed by filmmakers such as Gus van Sant (ELEPHANT, LAST DAYS, PARANOID PARK), Olivier Assayas (SUMMER HOURS) and Gela Babluani (13 TZAMETI - Lion of the Future at Venice, Jury Prize at Sundance and European Discovery at the European Film Awards) as well as numerous international film retrospectives of directors such as Charlie Chaplin, François Truffaut and Claude Chabrol. Full Bio »

Webinar Summary

As the world becomes flatter and technology brings us closer together, opportunities for international cooperation continue to abound. For producers or creatives looking to find or bolster their next indie project, there’s a huge amount of potential in joining forces with companies or teams from other countries and pooling your resources together, creating something larger than the sum of its parts. Forming an international co-production can give you access to more funding and financing opportunities, more access to locations, actors and crew, and more sales and distribution opportunities after the film is finished. But while international co-productions can reap great rewards, they also present unique challenges. After all, each country has its own set of rules and regulations, its own red tape, and its own processes for getting things done. Navigating this transnational world requires a set of skills and wherewithal that can be hard earned but is hugely valuable.

International co-productions are becoming more common in both mainstream cinema and the indie space. But while it yields results, it’s not a science. Collaboration never is. If you have your sights set outwards and are interested in working across country lines to create your next film, be prepared for some unique hurdles. For one, how do you even get started? How do you find international talent or partners in the first place? And once you find them, how do you woo them into working with you? How do you manage financing and how do you make compromises that make all parties happy? After all, collaboration is challenging no matter what, but working with people in another country, people who might not even share the same first language as you, amps that challenge up to another level.

Birgit Kemner is a French-German producer who has headed up successful co-productions for nearly a decade. All her productions have been selected and awarded in renowned festivals such as the Cannes or Venice Film Festival. Birgit was previously Head of Marketing and Festivals at the MK2 group and has worked on international releases of over 50 films directed by filmmakers such as Gus van Sant (ELEPHANT, LAST DAYS, PARANOID PARK), Olivier Assayas (SUMMER HOURS) and Gela Babluani (13 TZAMETI - Lion of the Future at Venice, Jury Prize at Sundance and European Discovery at the European Film Awards) as well as numerous international film retrospectives of directors such as Charlie Chaplin, François Truffaut and Claude Chabrol. Birgit is bringing her years of successful co-production experience exclusively to the Stage 32 community.

Birgit will use her extensive background to walk you through every step of creating a successful international co-production. She will begin by discussing tips on how to choose good projects in the first place and how to identify the right partners for you and your vision. She’ll teach you how to network and attract partners, especially in international markets when you often have ten minutes or less to make an impression. Birgit will then go over the challenges of funding and the resources available, especially in European markets. She will then talk about strategies and tips for your transnational partnership to survive and thrive, including tools to communicate, effective contracts, cash flow schedule, and how to determine who does what when. Finally, Birgit will delve into steps to take after the film is complete to bring it to the international market, get it into festivals, and optimize both marketing and sales. Simply put, you will be learning from one of the best.

Birgit will illustrate all of these points by using two of her own films as case studies, HUMAN CAPITAL, which played in competition at Tribeca Film Festival, and EL ARDOR, which was an official selection at Cannes Film Festival.

 

 

Praise for Birgit's webinar:

 

"Birgit gave me more information about international co-productions than I even knew existed. I now feel totally prepared and energized to tackle my next project"

-James R.

 

"Great slides and great information!"

- Marisé S.

 

"Awesome! Birgit covered the bases and inspired me to look outside the box."

-Clint A.

 

"Very informative, helpful information and guidance to take our next step into making our film. Thank you!"

-Anastasia C.

What You'll Learn

  • Tips to Make Sure You’re Choosing the Right Project
  • A Checklist on How To Choose the Right Partners
  • How to Network at Film Markets
    • Berlin
    • Cannes
    • Rotterdam
    • San Sebastian
  • How to Take Co-Production Meetings at Film Markets
    • A market catalogue overview
    • How to prepare for co-production meetings
    • What to expect during co-production meetings at the film markets
    • How to follow up from film market meetings
  • Film Financing
    • What do you need to prepare?
    • How does the script fit in?
    • Key materials you will need for film financing
  • How to Internationally Co-Produce Successfully Together
    • Budget
    • Understanding who does what
    • Contracts
    • Understanding the rules
  • How to Survive an International Co-Production
    • Communication and tools
    • Co-production calendar
    • Pre-production, production, post-production
  • How Do you Bring Your Completed Film to the International Market?
    • Festival strategy
    • Marketing and sales
  • Example Case Study of Birgit's film: HUMAN CAPITAL
    • Official Competition, Tribeca Film Festival
    • Nominated for an Italian Academy Award
  • Example Case Study of Birgit's film: EL ARDOR
    • Official Selection, Cannes Film Festival
    • 14 Nominations for the Argentinean Academy Awards
  • Detailed Breakdown of Film Funds – France & Europe
    • France
    • Example : CNC Aides aux Cinémas du Monde
    • Europe
    • Example : Media and Eurimages
  • Q& A with Birgit

About Your Instructor

Birgit Kemner is a French-German producer who has headed up successful co-productions for nearly a decade. All of her productions have been selected and awarded in renowned festivals such as the Cannes, Tribeca or Venice Film Festival. Birgit was previously Head of Marketing and Festivals at the MK2 group and has worked on international releases of over 50 films directed by filmmakers such as Gus van Sant (ELEPHANT, LAST DAYS, PARANOID PARK), Olivier Assayas (SUMMER HOURS) and Gela Babluani (13 TZAMETI - Lion of the Future at Venice, Jury Prize at Sundance and European Discovery at the European Film Awards) as well as numerous international film retrospectives of directors such as Charlie Chaplin, François Truffaut and Claude Chabrol.

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Questions?

If you have a generic question about Stage 32 education you can take a look at our frequently asked questions section on our help page, or feel free to contact support with any other inquiries you might have.

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